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Full text of "Past and present of Bureau County, Illinois : together with biographical sketches of many of its prominent and leading citizens and illustrious dead"

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977.301 I 

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GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



3 1833 00828 8935 



PAST AND PRESENT 



OF 



ByRMu_CoyjiXX.jLLiNois 

By GEORGE B. HARPJNGTQN. A. M.. 

. TOGETHER WITH 



BIOGP.APHICAL SKETCHES 



Of many of Its Prominsnt and LeaJiag Citi-ens an;l Illustrious Dead. 



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ILLUSTRATED 



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CHICAGO 

THE PIONEER PUBLISHING CC 
19Co 



PAST AND pj;ksl:xt ok i'.uiniAr 



489 



,t,.ie. lloth arc well equipi)eil ostabli-liuioiiU and 
■1 lili; lal {jatronagc is fiijoyud in each. 

In l^'ib, in Tonica, 31r. Tlionijison was miiteil 
iti marriage to Miss Julia Barra.=.s, of Tonica, and 
tlioy have three children : l!oy, wlio looks after 
thodrug business in Spring Valley; George, who 
has charge of the drug store in Depiie and is a 
<:raduate of the Xortluvestern Pharmacy College; 
iiiid Edna,, at home. ilr. Thompson is a member 
(if tlic ^fasonie lodge at Spring Valley and also 
.,r tlir (Irand Army of the Eopuhlic and in liis 
piilirual views is a republican, active and influ- 
.'iitial ill the ranks of the pan v. He was aii- 
poiut.Ml jHKtinaster of Spring Valley on the Jst 
of December, ISS"., and has held the office con- 
tinuously since. lie is pustly acounted one of the 
entorprisinyT residents of the town in which he 
mulvrs his home and' his alert and enterprising 
.<|)irit ha\e been factors in its sub.-taniial impiove- 
iiuiit and political progress. 



GKOPGE D. P.A["lvi;. 

George 1). Bauer \wis born Xovemljcr '2'2, ^>>'>■J. 
i:i elation townsiiip, and within the boiJcis of 
tliat toun.-,inp he still lives, his tirue. and enejgies 
b. in- dcNuted to general agricultural pursuits. 
lie ov.ns and occupies a farm of two hundred and 
eighty acre.', which he has brought under a high 
state of cultivation and the consensus of public 
opinion classes him with the represeiitative agri- 
culturists of his district. iUs parents were John 
II. and Condy (Miller) Bauer, both of whom were 
natives of Bremen, Gernumy. In the year of IStS 
the father became a resident of Bureau county, 
Illinois, and here met and married Miss ^Miller, 
the wedding being celebrated in 1S.50. They be- 
caiiK^ the parents of nine chiblren: Thomas, 
Su^.ui, Gforge, Katie, iMary, Lucy, Barbara, Bosa 
and Plii'lip, and the last named died at the age 
of three years. 

George D. Bauer obtained his educnfion in dis- 
trict school jS"o. 6 in Clarion town-hip ami in the 
peiiods of vacation worked at farm laboi-, so tliat 
he was well qualified by pi'acticr.l e.xpei'ience for 
the v.ork which he undertook on attaining his 
iiuijority. He is now the owmer of two hundred 
and ii,L;hty acres of land, con.stituting a valuable 
farm and in its equipments and acec.-sorie- it is 
iiioilern and well improved. 

In ISSS Mr. Bauer was n.arried to :\ris- ilari- 
etta Mebergall, a daughter of John and Katie 
(Trautwein) ^lebergall, both of whom were na- 
tives of Germany. In the family of Jlr. and Mr^. 
Bauer were six children: Louisa, Clara, LeEoy, 
Florence, Howard and Xettic. In his political 
view.s Mr. Bauer is a republican and has served as 
supervisor fr.r two ter.ns a< tn.vn cl^rk fo- ten 
years, as road commissioner three vears and a- 
^:'.ool trustee for six vears. lie bflon-> to the 
M'.dr-rn Woodmen caiati. Xo. ??r, at T.a M..ill.\ 



and lie and hi- wife arc members of the German 
Evangelical charcli. He has led a life of activity 
and usefuln,-.", his business methods, h.i; public 
record and hi- private life alike conforming to the 
ethics whieli g.ixern linuuiable manhood. 



CHAiM.ES EDWAKJ) SlSLEi;. 

Charles Edward Sister, w!io owns and operates a 
farm of eighty acres on section 13, Walnut town- 
ship, was born in Wyanet township, this county, 
Autfust 2, IS-jti. His jiarents were Georiie W. and 
Mary (Whitmarsh) Sisler. The father's birth oc- 
curred ill Lyeoming, Pennsylvania, June V, 1814, 
while the motli r was born in S2)ringfielJ, Massa- 
chusetts, June lo. 18-.*.j. George W. Sisler re- 
moved from the Keystone stitte to Xew York and 
became a resident of Bureau county, Illinois, in 
183V, thus casting in his lot with the early 
settlers who reclaimed this region and planted the 
seeds of early civilization and development here. 
He died in Isiio, having for several years survived 
his wife, who passed away February 1, ISf?. 

Charbs Edward Sisle'r acquired his liucation 
in the distiiii schools of this county, ami \v-u5 
reared lo maidiood under the parenti-l roo:', where 
he was early trained, to habits of induscry. econ- 
omy and pei-sevei-auee, habit-- which have proved of 
the utmost value to him in his later business life. 
He has always been an eiiergeiic man. and has 
labored persistently and earnestly to gait, a start 
and to win success aa the yea rs have gone by. He 
had no especial fainily or pecuniary advantages at 
the outset of his career, ami he i? now t;;" owner 
of eighty acres of very ricli and produ^ li-.e land 
on section 13, Walnut township, constituting a 
farm that is well impruv-ed. 

On the Kth of X'oven.ber, ISSl, Mr. Sisler was 
married to Aliss Elizabeth li. Breed, who ivas born 
January .5, IS-'-S, a daughter of Dr. S. P. and 
Alzina (Powers) Breed. Her father, who was 
born February 1, ISIO, in Eochcster, X"ew York, 
passed away in this county, IMarch 21, 1002, while 
his wife, who was born June 3, ltS2T, in Mont- 
pelier, Vermont, is now living iu Princeton. Th.eir 
daitgluer Elizabeth wa- etlucatcd in th.^ public 
schools of Princeton and was graduated .'-om the 
high school in the class of 18T.5. She remained 
at home until she gave Iser hand in marriage to 
Mr. Sisler. Thov became the parents of eleven 
childi-eii. of whom" thrfe arc> deceased. Tr.'^^e still 
living are: Gc^rev S.. born October 2". 1S82 ; 
Lula P., March 2:i; ls.s,^ M.,;-k- TT.. Julv -', 18S0; 
Guv B., Februai-v 2?, IS:-) ; Carl P.. Juif 1. 1802; 
Clyde H.. Mav "i. ISOi: Alzina M., Ja::::arv 10, 
1808, and Edna F., April K, lOOo. 

Mr. Sisler votes witli rh" democrac}-. but has 
never be"!) a '^oUtj,-;,,.! ;.-j ti,L. sense of of'-:.;-^-seek- 
in?. He and lii- family are members of tla- Meth- 
odist Protest iiir eiini-,h and are highlv esteemed 
people in the coiM-iiiinity. t'.e hospitidi'ty ^.f their 



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m.W CULM'Y. 



Jli-. Sisler is coimeclcd vitli tliu .Moilcin W'dndincn 
camp, Xo. 17, mid also witli giirrisou Ni.. lul. of 
the Knights of the Globe. His friemls ami ]ua-\,- 
hors speak of him iu terms of pi-,iisc an. I r'Hii- 
iiiendation, and have naught ti.' s.iy ihai i> ik.i 
favorable concerning the family. J-'iiIIhwiiil; ib.Mi' 
marriage 'Sir. and ilrs. Si.sler began tlieir dnmustie 
life in this county, \vliere they lived upon a farm 
until 1884, wlieu they removed to Lincoln, Ne- 
braska. There they resided until r.105, when they 
returned to lUireau county and took' up their abode 
in Walnut township, wliore they luive since lived. 



JOSEPH McCKAY. 

.'n.~(]ih ^h ('lay is now in possession of a lieanti- 
ful farm whicii is the visible evidence of a well 
spent and active business life. He was born in 
the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 10, 
ISoG, and his residence in Hlinois dates from 1SG5. 
He -nas early left an orphan, being but two years 
of age at the time of his motlier"s death and he 
does not remember anything about his parents. 
He pursued his education in the schools of I'hila- 
delpliia and of Westmoreland county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and remained a resident of the east until 
after tlie Civil war. In response to his country's 
call for troops he enlisted in August, ISGi, and 
served until the close of hostilities and participat- 
ed iu three engagements: Bermuda Humlred, ilie 
capture of Fort Steadnian on the ^-Jth of ^larch, 
1SG5, and the attack on the works of Peter.>Inirg on 
the 3d of April of the latter year. He had pre- 
viously been a memiier of the state militia and as- 
sisted in capturing ^Morgan when he made his raid 
in Ohio. 

Following his discharge from military service 
Mr. ]\IcC'ray came to Illinois and has since been a 
resid._nt of Bnreaii county. Here he has so di- 
rected hi- labors that he is today the owner of a 
valuable farm property of one hundred and eighty- 
four acres. This is one of the garden spots of this 
section of the state. It is improved with excellent 
buildings and lieautiful shade trees, which atford 
shelter from the hot rays of the summer sun. The 
fields have been placed under a high state of cul- 
tivation and have produced rich and abundant 
crops which, finding a ready sale upon the n\ar- 
kct, have made him one of the substantial agri- 
culturists of the comnninitv. 

On the 2Sth of ]\Iarch, iSGO, Mr. McCray was 
united in marriage to ^Miss Hannah J. Baird, the 
wedding being celebrated in Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, where occurred the birth of Mrs. 
McCray on the Gth of ^farch. 1840. She was 
educated in the .schools of that county and was a 
daughter of Charles and ilartba (Snyder) Baird, 
who were likewise natives of the Keystone state. 
Her parents bd'an^e resident-; of Illinois in ISGo, 
settling in La ^r>iille townsliin, I'ureau countv, 



ubere her father di.d at the ailvanced age of 
eighiy-six years. Her mother is still living at the 
ripe oM age of eighty-nine years. Mrs. McCray 
was the eldest of the seven cliildrea born unto .Mr. 
and ;\rrs. Baird and by her marriage she has be- 
cunie the mother of twelve children : Charles B., 
bnrii .March x"2, 18G1; Hannah M., Februarv 2-^, 
1.SG3; S.irah .AL, November 25, 1S64; James L., 
September 1:5. ISGG; ]\Lalissa J.. September 10, 
l.SiJS; J.,hn W., October 21. 1S70; Ida il., August 
I'l. ls:-.>; ]),.'.,.„:i. Srptrmber 4, 1874; Frank. 
Novcmlr :;ri, l,s7i;: AUiert, November 21, 1878; 
Srott A.. Mav 17, jssi; and Gertrude I., Auirust 
30,1881. 

Mr. ^rcCray belongs to the Grand Army of the 
Republic and thus maintains pleasant relations 
wit!i the boys in blue, with whom he served upon 
the battie-fields of the south. In politics he has 
always been a stanch and stalwart repuldican since 
Ci'.stiug itis first presidential vote for Abra'nam 
Lincoln in 18C0. Ho voted the second time iov the 
martyred president, at Bermuda Hundred, coming 
oft' ])icket duty for this purpose, and with liis mus- 
krt by his loft side he deposited his ballot with his 
right haii'l and thus again announced his allegiance 
to the first reiaiblicau presideiit. He and his wife 
have lon_2r been members of the :Mothodist c;;urch, 
work and upbuilding they iiave taken nn active 
and helpful pan. Mr. McCray in his well spent 
life^ has ever displayed those traits of character 
which lead to success in business, to loyaltv in 
citizenship and which win respect from one's 
friends and ueighbors. His life has indeed been 
a useful and upright oiu; and he has reared a 
family of which he has every reason to bo proud. 
There are nitw six sons and four sons-in-law who 
vote tlie republican ticket and are ardent advo- 
cates of Presidvant Boosevelt. The fam'ly is in- 
deed a promincMl. one iu this county and well de- 
serves mention in this historv. 



K. GI.'AN-J- SLAIJL. 

K. Giant .>^.:arl is a unrthv re[.resen(ative of 
an old and h-.-n-jred family of'P.ureau ce.unty. his 
father being John Searl, who was born in Dayt'.m, 
Ohio. July 28, 18:10. and in 1834. when four years 
i.f age, wa-s brmight to this county by his father. 
r>rown Searl. who located in Selby to\vnsiiip. tak- 
ing up a claim on section 32. whicli is now owned 
by John Iiick. Upon this farm the grandfaihcr of 
our subject, who was born iLiy lo. 17!l)7. died 
January 27, 1S<'>7. He was a Mason. 

Here John S^iarl srcw to manhood in the usual 
manner of farm lads in a frontier district and con- 
tinued to make hi-? homo here throughout the re- 
mainder of his life, his death occurring August 
]■">. 1890. He ergaged in farming and mer with 
excellent success, becoming the owner of a large 
acreage in Selby township, and ho also bad tv.-o 
farms in Iowa. As a prominent and inf.ueiitial 



JOSEPH H5CRAY 



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MPS JOSEPH fi^CRAY 



PAST AXl) ritHSENT OF BUIJEAU COLNTi'. 



49d 



citizen of his coiuiiiunity lie wiis ealleJ upou to 
till the otlices of assessor, coUector and supervisor, 
;;ii,l was a man highly respected and esteemed by 
all who knew him. In early manhood he wedded 
Aliss xVmauda Miller, who was also a native of 
Ohio and came to Illinois with her father during 
her girlhood. She was born January 29, 1839, ami 
died February 1, ISSS. They were the parents 
of ten children, namely: William \\'., who died 
in Iowa some two yeai's ago; Benjamin, a resident 
of Selby township; Sarah X., deceased; Mrs. ^lary 
Miiita iiawson, who makes her home in Missouri; 
Andrew and ilillard, both residents of Princeton; 
;Mrs. Samantha Gross, also of Princeton; Samuel, 
who died in this county; E. Grant, of this review; 
and ]Mrs. ifaria Hassler, of Selby township. 

E. Grant"Searl was born in Selby township on 
the old home farm, September 27, ISGS, and was 
reared to farm work, his time being divided be- 
tween work in the fields and attendance at the 
country schools. Throughout the years of his man- 
hood he has carried on agricultural pursuits and 
in connection with general farming devotes con- 
siderable attention to stock-raising. He now owns 
and operates a fine farm of one liundred and tuen- 
ly acres, which is rich and arable and has been 
placed under a high state of cultivation. 

j\ir. Searl M'as married in 1S92 to iliss Katie 
Heitz, wlio is also a native of Selby townshij) and 
is a daughter of David Heitz, a well known resi- 
dent of this community. Three children blessed 
this union : Lloyd, who died at the age of six 
months; Ternon, who died at the age of three 
months, and Ira, who was born in October, 1900, 
and is now the only survivor. 'Mr. Searl gives his 
political support to the men and measures of the 
republican party and in the spring of 190G was 
elected road commissioner, which othee he is now 
acceptably filling. He has also served as school 
director and takes a commendable interest in ad- 
vancing the educational and material welfare of 
bis township and county. 



DR. L. D. HICKMAX. 

Dr. L. D. Hickman, an osteopath and X-ray 
specialist practicing in Princeton with oftlces on 
South Main stieet, has followed his profession 
here since 1899 and is the only representative of 
the science of osteopathy in this city. He nou' 
enjoys a large and growing patronage and stands 
as one of the foremost exponents of the nev," 
school. 

Dr. Hickman was born near Kirksvillc. i[i~- 
souri. and is a graduate nf the American School 
of Osteojiathy in that city of the class of 1899. 
He practiced for some time before he took his 
course and then promoted his efficiency by broad 
and comprehensive study. From the beginning 
he has enjoyed a good practice, which has con- 
stantly grown as he has demonstrated his ability 



to successfully cope with the intricate problems 
wliich continually confront the practitioner in hia 
efforts to restore health. He has to some extent 
teen a contributor to medical journals and he also 
lectures upon the methods of practice v\hich he 
employs. He has thoroughly acquainted himself 
with the uses of the X-ray, which he employs suc- 
cessfully in his practice. His patronage conies 
from all parts of Bureau and neighboring counties. 
He has never lost a case of pneumonia and has 
been particularly successful in his treatment of 
tuberculosis and other diseases which have for long 
years baflled the skill of many of the expert med- 
ical practitioners. 

Dr. Hickman was married in Missouri to ]\Iiss 
-Myra Hook, of Mexico, that state, and they have 
one child, Maurine, born ilarch 28, 190G. Dr. 
Hick'man belongs to the Masonic fraternity, in 
which he has attained tlie Kniglit Templar degree, 
and both ho and hi= wife are afTiliated with the 
Eastern Star, while his membership relations also 
embrace the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
In his political affiliation he is independent, and 
both he and liis wife are members of the Christian 
church. Their circle of friends is extensive, their 
many admirable social qualities securing for them 
the kindly regard and winning for them the 
ho-pitaliiy of many of the best homes of the cit\. 



HAT;RY WHITVER. 

Harry Whitvei- is the owner of a valuable farnt- 
ing property of two hundred acres about a mile 
from the village of Walnut and is serving as 
postmaster of the village. He is one of Bureau 
county's native sons, having been born on the 15th 
of April, 18G7. His parents were John and Mary 
(Carnahan) Whitvcr, the former a native of 
Switzerland and the latter of Ohio. They became 
residents of Illinois in 1S.:>1, settling in Bureau 
county. In their family were fifteen children, of 
whom four arc now deceased. 

Harry Whitver, whose name introduces this rec- 
ord, was the foui'teenth in order of birth and to 
the common schools of the county he is indebted 
for the early educational privileges he enjoyed, 
which were supplemented by a course in Dixon 
(Illinois) Xormal College. Throughout the great- 
er part of his life he has carried on general agi'i- 
cultural pursuits, having in his youth become 
familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil 
and caring for the crop=. He now owns two hun- 
dred acres of rich and valuable land which he in- 
herited from his father and upon which he makes 
his home. It is pleasantly located abotit a mile 
from the village of Walnut. After leaving school 
he began farming and has so continued to the 
present time. From the beginning he has been 
successful and he now manages his farm in con- 
nection with discharging the duties of postmaster. 
His home is a beautiful residence and upon his 



PAST AND PlIESKXT OF F.LJ;EAr COUXTY. 



place arc many otliur niodiM-n and sulj-tautial im- 
provomuiits. Tlie faiiii ^^lli^:ll In- own.-. ua> laken 
up from tlie guvenUiKiil \i\ hi- fallier at a m-t 
of a dollar and a qiiartfi per aire and i.~ tuda\- 
worth from one liimdreJ and seventy-tive to two 
hundred dollar- per aere. lOverv thinj; about the 
place is kept in excellent coiulition aud the fields. 
being richly tilled, bring forth bountLOu- har\e-t^. 

JLr. Whitver was married February 17. l.ss-i. 
to iliss Carrie I. Caton, who wa- Imrii in J'led- 
nioiit. West Yiri;iiiia. Si-pteiid'.'r ."), \st\', , a daugh- 
ter of William an.I Kniily (Arni'.ui) Caton. who 
were natives of PeiinsyKania and removed to Iowa 
during the girlhood d"ays of their daughter, since 
which time tlie\ have been residents of that state. 
They had four children, ,,f vlmm lyfrs. Whit\er 
is the youngest. Slii> was edmaied in tlie Walnut 
public schools and by her manjagr ha- bLHume 
the mother of seven children: Clarenee C. born 
July 11, ISS--,; Vera L., April 19. ISST ; Alma I., 
January 31, 18S0 ; Hazel L., Febriuirv 6, 1801: 
Ira M.. January 28, 1893; Flarrv Arniour, April 
19. isii; : and Gertrude 31., May i, 1900. 

31 r. Whitver's fellow townsmen, recognizing his 
worth and ability, have frec|uontIy called him to 
pulilic otlice or conferjed upon him positions of 
public trust. lie has served as township collector 
and is postmaster of the village of Walnut. He is 
a member of Walnut lodge, Xo. T25, A. F. iV A. 
M., and in his political views is a stalwart repub- 
lican. He and his family belong to the Christian 
church and are prominent socially in the com- 
munity. Mr. Whitver has spent his entire life in 
this locality, so that his life history is as an open 
book which all may read and upon its pages are 
found the record of many good deeds and of suc- 
cessful accomplishment in the business world. His 
genuine worth and many good qualities have won 
for him the respect and trust of his fellow men 
and ho certainly deserves mention in this volume 
as a niuesentative citizen. 



HEP MAX E. ABBOTT. 
Herman E. Abbott, of Sheffield, manager of a 
large and valuable estate, and agent for various 
fire insurance companies, w-as born ilay 10, 18G-"i, 
in the city which is still his home, a son of 
Clement W. Abbott. He pursued his preliminary 
education in the public schools of Sheflield and 
afterward attended the Di.von Xormal College, 
at Dixon, Hlinois, and Cornell College, at 3Iount 
Vernon, Iowa. He was reared to farm life and 
devoted his energies to general agricultural pur- 
suits until 1S92, when he became connected with 
commercial interests as a dealer in lumber, agri- 
cultural implements, carriages, wagoiH, etc. The 
finn was known as Bat icy & Abbott, and so con- 
tinued until 1898, when"3[r. Abbott disposed of 
his interest. He then removed to Tiskihva, 
where he remained a vear, after which he re- 



turned to ^hdlield to look after his farming i„- 
teri'sts and his father's estate. lie ncv. Iki; a 

gratifying income and in the manayeuiini ,:( thi 
Abboft estate he du-play=. keen hu-uir-. :,a;;,„-,u 
and understanding. lie is als(i aj^ent for diti.i"- 
ent fire insurance companie-. 

31r. Abbott fraternally is connected with Vnie- 
lodg.', Xo. 145. A. F. & A. M., of Sheflield, and 
Sheffield lodge, Xo. 8n8. I. 0. 0. F., of the '.-am.; 
place, while religiou,-ly he is a meiidjcr of the 
Unitarian church. He is a voung man of entir- 
prise ami hi^ good .pialitit- have made him p^.pi.- 



MAP'i'lX };.VXSCilBACH. 

The sidjjcci of this sketch was for uumy year- 
one of the truly rejiresentative citizens of Biu-ea\i 
ciiunty, well known and universally respected. 
He ua- horn in Baden, Germany, June 6, 18:;-.', 
and wa- the son of Martiu and Caroline (Bischof- 
berger) Banschbach, both of whom were natives 
of the same country, but who came to this country 
in 18.j3 or 1853. and here resided during tl;e 
remainder of their lives, making their home in 
Selby township. Bureau county, where the father 
was engaged in farming. In 'the sketch of Wil- 
liam Banschbach, on another page of this work, 
will lie found more concerning this family. 

Martin Banschbach, of whom we no\y write, 
came to tliis county in 18-53, in company with his 
brother William, wlio is now residing in the city 
of Princeton, living a retired life. While yet 
in the old country he attended the public schools 
and laid the foundation for that active business 
career which distinguished him as a man of ]-c- 
source-. one calculated to deal righteously and 
justly with his fellowman. 

On coming to this country Mv. Banschbach 
resided for a time in the city of Pitt.?burg, but 
in 18-34 came to Bureau county with the rest 
of the family. Locating in Selby township, he 
remained there for one year and then removed to 
Pekin, Tazewell county. Illinois, where he re- 
mained until ISGO, when he returned to Bureau 
county and located at Hepue, where he engaged 
in the grain business, buying and shipping to 
tiie markets by rail and by canal. Later he en- 
gageil also in the lumber business, in both of 
whieh lines he was quite successful. From time 
to time he purchased lands, owning and operat- 
ing one or two farms. In whatever line of busi- 
ness he enga.o-ed he wa= uniformly succcssfid. ex- 
ercisino- o-iiod judgment and business sa!:acit\- in 
all things. 

Before leaving Penn-^ylyaniu he was unit'^d m 
marriage with ^liss ^farv X. Pedlinushafer. a 
daughter of George and Dorothea Eedling^ial'.T. 
natives of Germany, who came to this countiw in 
1848, locatinsj in Washincton county, Penn-vl- 











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PAST AND l'i;i:SKXT OF P.UEEAU COUXTr. 



499 



vaiu;>, where they made their home uutil 1854, 
wheu they removed to I'ekin, Illinois, where they 
remained one year, moving thence to Clayton 
county, lovv-a. George Kedlingshafer was by oc- 
cupation a farmer, and in that line of bui^iness 
was quite successful. lie continued to reside in 
Clayton county during the remainder of his life. 
After his death his widow removed to Lucas 
county, Iowa, where her death occurred August 
14, ISSl, at the age of seventy-six years. They 
were the parents of eight children, of whom four 
nre now living: Elizabeth Ann, wife of William 
Hausclibacl), residing in Princeton; John, of 
Sheridan, Iowa; Lott, residing near Brownsville, 
Pennsylvania; and Mary jST., widow of our sub- 
ject, ilrs. Pianschbach was partly reared and edu- 
cated in Pennsylvania, being eleven years of ago 
wheu she accompanied her parents to the United 
States. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Banschbach six children were 
born, three sons and three daughters: George, a 
(lour dealer residing in Chicago; Charles, a flour 
agent of Depue, Illinois; William, with tlie Illi- 
nois Central Pailroad at Chicago; Emma, Eliza- 
beth and Lillie, at home. 

Politically, Mr. Banschbach was a democrat, but 
never a partisan. He believed the principles ad- 
vocated by the democratic party were more for 
the best interests of the people than those advo- 
cated by other parties, but he saw and recognized 
the good in his fellowmen, whether they agreed 
with him in politics or not. Religiously he was 
a member of the German Evangelical churnli, be- 
lieving in the doctrines taught by that religious 
body. Praternally, he was a member of the Jla- 
sonic order, and in his life exemplified its prin- 
ciples. He tried to do his duty by his fellow- 
tnen and aimed to merit their respect. Tluit he 
succeeded in this is testified by those with whom 
he was long associated. His death occurred 
March 4, 1890, wlien but a few months less than 
sixty-eight years old. In his death the com- 
munity lost a worthy citizen. 

At his death Mr. Banschbach left a large estate, 
w-hich has since been admirably managed by ]\rrs. 
Banschbach, assisted by her children. She still 
makes her home in Depue, her daughters being 
with her. She is a member of the German Evan- 
gelical church and endeavors to live as the blaster 
would have her live. 



G.\BPTEL GEITTHEE. 
Gabriel Geuther, engaged in farming in Clar- 
ion, his native township, wa.s born March 9, 1870, 
his parents being Adam and Caroline (Eaber) 
GcuHirr, both of whom were natives of Germany. 
Crp/:~ing the Atlantic from the fatherland to the 
"^^S^vorld they became residents of Bureau coun- 
.^^ the early '50s and the father folio ,vcd farm- 
■ng througliout his entire life in order to provide 



for his family, spending the greater part of the 
time in Clarion township. He died on the 22d 
of November, 1893, and his wife survived until 
July 8, 1903, when slie, too, passed to her final 
rest. 

Gabriel Geuther acquired his education in the 
schools of Clarion township, and has always fol- 
lowed farming. That he has prospered as the 
years have gone by is indicated in his excellent 
farm, comprising one hundred and twenty-four 
acres of good land. He rai&?s corn and oats and 
to some extent mixed stock. His home is pleas- 
antly and attractively located on section 24, and 
the residence was erected by him. There are 
many good shade trees upon the place, and the 
latest improved machinery facilitates the work of 
tlie fields. 

On the 50th of February, 1895, occurred tlie 
marriage of Gabriel Geuther and Miss Emma 
Stamberger, who was born in this county Febru- 
ary 8, 1875, and is a daughter of Charles and 
Barbara (Gross) Stamberger. both natives of Ger- 
many. The former came to America when but 
six years of age, and the latter at the age of thir- 
teen, and they were married in Clarion town- 
ship February" 17, 1867. They have now trav- 
eled life's journey together as man and wife for 
thirty-nine years. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. 
Geuther has been blessed with one daughter. Leola 
Lillian Bertha, born October 1, 1902. The pa- 
rents are members of the German Lutheran 
church, and Mr. Geuther is politically a republi- 
can. Fle is classed with tho enterprising young 
farmers of his native township, and the success 
which he has alreadv achieved argues well for the 
future. 



J.\MES WITMAX ADAMS. 

James Wyrnan Adams, a representative of the 
farming interests of Bureau county, was born near 
Augusta, iMaine, on the 28tlji of August, 1840, his 
parents being Podney M. and Liddie (Stover) 
Adams. The father was a farmer by occupation 
and on removing to the middle west in 1842 
settled in Chicago, but soon afterward made his 
way to the Fox river and established his home in 
Oswego. There he lived for three years, when he 
removed with his family to Concord township in 
1847. He made the journey with wagon and a 
team of oxen and purchased two hundred and 
forty acres of land. With characteristic energy 
he began its cultivation and improvement and 
throughout his entire life he continued farming, 
making his home in the sanie neigliborhood until 
he passed away on the 20th of "January, 1860. 
His widow survived until August, 1862, vvhon she 
was also called to her final rest. 

James W. Adams was only two years of age 
when brought by his parents to Illinois. His edu- 
cation was acquired in the countrv schools and he 



I'AST AM) r 



;.\T OF ];li;j:al" cuuxty 



reufiveJ practical trainiug at farm labor through 
the assistance which he rendered in the improve- 
ment and cultivation of the home farm. He was 
only twenty years of age when his father's death 
occurred, after wliich he purchased the interest of 
the other heirs in the old home property, upon 
which ho has since lived. He has here erected a 
good residence and substantial outbuildings and 
in fact has added all modern equipments and ac- 
cessories, making the place a model farm projierty. 

On the -Joth of December, ISGt!, Mr. Adams was 
nited in marriage to Miss Louisa ^Vhite, of Web- 
ster, Iowa, a sister of Fred E. White, who is 
a congressman and a meHd)er of one of the old and 
influential families of Iowa. 'J'lie father, God- 
fred White, came from Germany to America when 
Mrs. -Vdams was only six months old. Unto our 
subject and his wife have been born six children, 
who are still living: Frederick E., a resident farm- 
er of Plymouth county, Iowa; Charles ]•:., who 
follows farming in Concord township. Bureau 
county; Elmer E., a bridge builder for the Chi- 
cago & Xorthweslern Railroad Company, living at 
Biida; Percy E., a farmer of Kewance, Illinois; 
Ida L., the wife of Alfred Hartsell, of Princeton: 
and Loui- E., living at home. 

:\Ir. Adams gives his political allegiance to the 
repulilican parly, and is one of the active work- 
ers in its local ranks. Fie is a member of the 
Wesley Methodist Episcopal church, and his in- 
terest centers in those lines of thought and ac- 
tivity which work for honorable manhood and for 
substantial improvement in the county. Almost 
his entire life has here been passf>d, and in an 
active business career he has at all times been 
found thorou-hh reliable and trustworthv. 



GEoPGE w. McDonald. 

George \\. ilcDonald is operating the old home- 
stead farm near La iloiUc. He was born in Bu- 
reau coimty, Illinois. February 2, 1S72, and is 
a son of Lester Monroe and Eachel Ann Mc- 
Donald. The father died in 1898, but the mother 
is still living with her son George on the old 
home farm. She was born in 1853, while ^Fr. 
McDonald was born in 18-51. He was a farmer 
by occupation and devoted the greater part of 
his time and energies to agricultural pursuits. 
In the family of this worthy couple were the 
following named: George W.. Alice M., David J., 
Frank, :Mabel, Lester and Leonard, but the last 
named is now deceased. 

George W. McDonald, whose name introduces 
this review, acquired his education in the com- 
mon schools ami wa.s reared to the occupation of 
farming, early becoming familiar with the best 
■ methods of tilling the sod and caring for the 
stock. He now operates the home farm and is 
one of the enterpi'ising agriculturists of the coiii- 
munitv. In addition to the tilling of the soil he 



is enuaged in the raising of Duroc Jersey uiid 
black^hogs. 

On the 1st of January, 189:., .Mr. McDoiuM 
was united in marriage to JNIiss Alice Jane .\ii- 
derson, the wedding being celebrated at lur huur- 
in Van Orin, Bureau countv. She died ui ls:is, 
and on the 1st of February,' 1905, Mr. ilcD,,ii;il,i 
wedded Gertrude Frances Williams, who was bum 
in 1881. 

Ml-. JlcDonald is a republican in his political 
allegiance and votes for the best interests of the 
town at local elections. He is a member of Ihe 
I'nited Brethren church and is a Christian gen- 
tleman who commands the respect and confidence 
of those who know him. Fraternally he is cim- 
nected with the Stars of Equity. He has alwavs 
resided in this county and his well spent life has 
made him respected by all with whom business 
or social relations have" brought him in contoct. 



iii:\i;v KRAMKi;. 

Henry Kramer, conduct iiig a merchant tailor- 
ing establishment in Ohio and numbered among 
the representative business men of the village, was 
born in Germany, September 13, 1S71. His resi- 
dence in Illinois dates from 1883, in which year 
he was brought from the fatherland to the United 
States by Ins parents, Carl and Margaret (Eb- 
ling) Kramer, who were likewise natives of Ger- 
many. In their family were nine children, of 
whom Henry was the seventh in order of birth. 
The family home was established in Memlota, La 
Salle county, and in March, 1900, they removed 
to Bureau county, settling in the village of Ohio. 

In the public schools of !Mendota Henry Kra- 
mer completed his education, which was begun in 
the schools of his native country. He afierwai-d 
learned the tailor's trade, which he has made his 
life work, and his persistency of purpose in the 
line of business activity in which he embarked as 
a young tradesman is undoubtedly one of the 
strong features of his success. He now has a 
well ajjpointed merchant tailoring establi.=hment 
and the work which he turns out is alwa3'3 first- 
class, so that he had a liiieral patronage, his busi- 
ness having increased year after year until it has 
now reached extensive and profitable proportions. 

On the SOth of February. 1895, Mr. Kramer 
was married to ^liss Louisa Gross, who was born 
in Mendota, February 35, 1870. There are three 
children of that marriage: Carl H.. born ^Marcti 
31, 1S9G: Julius J., March 20, 1898, and Chris- 
tian J., January 1, 1900. Mrs. Kramer's par- 
ents are John and ilargaret (Hummel) Gross, 
who were natives of Germany, whence they emi- 
grated to the new world. Their family numbered 
nine children, of whom Mrs. Kramer was the 
eighth in order of birth. She, too, was pdurat(>d 
in" the schools of :\rendota and became acquainted 



FAST AND J'JtKSKXT OF IIUIM.AL' ColXTV 



501 



th 



„.|li Iici- futu.e luisbaiul m their child 
l-i-atcrnally Mr. Krain.r is .onn.rtr, 
0,1(1 FeWows Lodge, Xc fn:. «( Ohin. and uitli 
il„_. Kni-lits of the Glohc 111. iMd.tual alle-iaiue 
I-. ;:ivea to the dornocraey niid on the 1st uf April, 
1;mh;. he Mas elected school trustee, wliieh otllee 
1,,. is now Idling. He is also serving as a nieni- 
1„T (if the village hoard for a second term, lie 
ami his family arc nieuihers of the German 
[,iitheraii elmreh. Through his entire business 
careei- he lias carried on the tailor's trade, and as 
proprietor of a leading estahlishment in this line, 
is now conducting a business tliat is gratifying 
and inofitahlo, his success being due to his indiis- 
trv. caiiahilitv and thoroughly reliable b\isiness 
ruethods. The faniilv are liiichlv esteemed in the 
village w-liei-e tliev reside, and the hijspitalitv of 
thehe>t hdines is'freelv aeiorded them. 



SEBASTIAX HKHBOLSIIKl MKlJ. 
For over a half century Sebastian Ilcrbols 
heimer has made his home in Bureau county, and 
for many years was acti\ely identified with it.- 
farining and stock-raising interests, but is now 
practically living retired, having, thivnigh his 
own well directed etfnrts, hecame the pll.-^^^s^(.r of a 
fine farm in Selby town^hij), where lie resides. 
Gonnauy is the land of his birth, being born in 
I'.avaria, December 22, 1S29, a son of Sebastian 
Hm'bolsheimer, who, as was a 'farmer, spent his 
entire life in that country, dying there in 1872, 
at the age of seventy-seven vears. Our sub- 
ject lost his mother when only two years old. 
In the familv were ten children, six sons and four 



daughters, and h 
America : I.eonai 
and Lucas. The 
thcrland, where 
still living. 
Sebastian Ilerl 



d t^ 



,-i>t(- 



lu'ijthers who came to 
it of Xew York eirv, 
rL-niamed in the fa- 
and one brother are 

of this r 



, pa.sed 

his boyhood and youth in Germany and received 
a good education in the schools of that country. 
-Vfrer putting aside his te.xt-books he followed 
farming and stock-raising and throughout his ac- 
tive business life continued to devote his atten- 
tion to those pursuits. It was in IS-il that he 
bade adieu to friends and native land and sailed 
f'lr the I'nited States, landing in Xew York. He 
proceeded at once to Chicago, where he remained 
uiitil October of that year, when he came to Bu- 
reau county. Soon after his arrival here he suf- 
fered with cholera and on account of illnes-s lost 
much time. He was first employed by the day 
and month, and, saving his money, was finally 
enabled to purchase forty acres of land near De- 
pue, in Selby township, in 1856, this being most- 
!v covered with timber. Two years later he sold 
tliat place and removed to Peru, wdiere he m.ade 
hi- home until October, 18G0, when he returned 
to Solby township, and bought forty acres on sec- 



tion 20. As time ]ia.-sed and he prospered in 
his undertalcings he added to liis property from 
time to time until he now has three hundred and 
seventy-five acres iu one body, incuiding consid- 
eralile timber laiul. Besides this farm he has 
:)ther ])ropcrty in Bureau county, mostly in Set- 
by township, aggregating six hundred and twenty- 
four acre.? He continued to carry on farming 
and stock-raising with nuirked success until about 
ten years ago, when he retired and is now enjoy- 
ing a well earned rest. His prosperity has come 
to him as the result of untiring labor, persistent 
energy and perseverance and the property he has 
gained is well merited. 

ilr. Ilerbolsheimcr has lieen twice married, his 
first wife being Miss ^lary Becht, who died about 
a year after their marriage. He later wedded 
Miss :Mary Daumer, who was born near Munich, 
in Bavaria, Germanv. in October, 1S3T, and died 
iu r)(_fnher. isfio. having nine children as fol- 
l(m>: George, a r(.>idi iit of lieiiver, Colorado, who 
is married and ha- two ehihlren: John, a farmer 
of Sell.v t..\vns],ip. \Hio is mai-ried and has three 
sons; ^farv. at home \ulh her father; Charles, 
•ilso a iv-id.nt of [hnvei-. who is married and 
has four children; William, a farmer of Berlin 
township, who is married and has two sons; 
Frank, a farmer (,f S.^lbv i(nvii-l,ip, wLo is mar- 
ried and has thieo .■hihjreii ; Anna, the wife of 
John II. Weber, a farmer of Hall lown.lup. bv 
whom she has thiT'C children; Knie. a resident 
of Chicago, and G. Leonard, at home. :\Ir. Ibn- 
bolshcimer has seventeen gramlebiblieii li\ing and 
three decea.sed. Politicall) he is independent and 
takes a comn.iendablc inreiest in public alTairs 
and is loyal to the interests of his adopted coun- 
try. He deserves great^ credit for the success 
that lie has achieved in life and he merits the es- 
teem and confidence in wdiich he is uniforinlv 
held. 



OTTO GIXGIUCH. 

Otto Gingrich, who owns and operates a valua- 
ble farm of two hundred and fortv acres in Min- 
eral township, was born July 3, 1833, in Hesse- 
Darmstadt, Germany, and is a son of Ilcrnian and 
Maria (Bachman) Gingrich. He spent the days 
of his boyhood and youth in the fatherland, and 
on the l.ith of April, 1S.")2, wdicn nineteen v'ears 
of age, crossed the Atlantic to simerica, believ- 
ing that he might enjoy better business opportu- 
milcs in the new- world. He settled in Putnam 
county, where he W'orkcd on a farm for four years, 
and afterward rented a farm for two years. In 
1858 ho removed to Bureau county, and with the 
money he had saved from his earnings he pur- 
chased eighty acres of land, constituting the nu- 
cleus of his present homestead property. To this 
he has added from titne to time until he now owns 
two hundred and forty acies and his farm is well 
improved, owing to the care and cultivation which 



PAST AXD I'KESEXT OF BUUKAl' CuUXTY. 



is bestowed upon it. His wife also owns thirty 
acres of land in Mineral township. The fields are 
now \\ell tilled and he uses the latest ijnproved ma- 
chinery in carrying on the farm work. 

In March, 1S58, in Putnam county, was cele- 
brated the marriage of ilr. Gingrich and iliss 
Anna Pcidolf. Unto them were born three chil- 
dren: Otto, a farmer residing in Xebraska ; Ed- 
ward C, who follows agricultural pursuits in the 
same state, and Marguerita, the wife of Fred Har- 
ris, a resident farmer of Bloomington, X'ebraska. 
The mother of these children died October 29, 
ISGT, and on the If.th of June, 1870, jMr. Ging- 
rich was married to Miss Elixabcth Wagner, a 
daugliter of Joliauncs and Wilholmiua (Schuuk) 
Wagner, who came from Germany to America in 
■ 1869. In this country the father "followed the oc- 
cupation of farming. By the second marriage of 
Mr. Gingrich there are four children: Amelia M., 
the wife of Cliarles Edwin Hiimphrevs. of Min- 
eral; Elizabeth, the wife of George Alexander, a 
merchant of Sheftlcld; Jo])n E., a farmer of Min- 
eral township, who wedded Miss IMinnie Case, of 
the village of Mineral ; and Herman C, who mar- 
ried X'ellie Cecil, of Concord township, and fol- 
lows farming on the home farm. 

IMr. Gingrich has served as school director for 
twenty years and is interested in the cause of edu- 
cation and its progress. He and his wife are 
identified with the Unitarian church, to tlie sup- 
port of which they are generous contributors. A 
self-made man, he has through industry and en- 
terprise, advanced from a humble position to one 
of aflluence, acquiring a propertv which now 
classes Inm with the substantial residents of his 
adopted county. 



MA.TOR SILAS BATTEY. 

Major Sila< Battcy, whose title indicated his 
service HI behalf of the Union in the Civil war, 
became a leading, prosperous and representative 
citizen of Bureau county, where for many years 
he owned and controlled extensive farming inter- 
ests and also operated largely in the devefopment 
of the rich coal deposits o"f this part of the state. 
The importance of his business connections and 
the helpful and beneficial influence which he e.x- 
orted in matters of general moment made him a 
leading citizen. 

A native of Rhode Island, lifajor Battey was 
born in Providence county, July 10, 1S15, 'a son 
of Sampson and Abigail (Phillips) Battey. The 
father was a native of Warwick, Rhode Island, 
and a representative of one of the old families of 
that stats. The life record of Major Battey was in 
many respects a varied and eventful one. He 
was reared to farm life but soon after starting 
upon an independent business career he became 
interested in an iron foundry and learned the 
molder's trade, which he afterwiird follnwed in 



Providence, Bristol and Pawiucket, Rhode Island 
being connected with that line of buaiii.'s.s uiini' 
coming to Bureau county in 1S5-1. HeiX' hr ],i;r- 
chascd a farm, which he cultivated and impruvr.l 
until the fall of 180-,', when, having been elert,..; 
sherifl' of the county, he removed to Princeton. 
After a term of two years as sheriff, ho, in thcj 
early part of lS6o, recruited a company of sol- 
diers for the war and was mustered into service 
with the rank of captain in February of that 
year. The company was assigned to the One Hun- 
dred and Pirty-iirst Regiment of Illinois A'oluii- 
teers, as Company H, and at that time Cajitaiu 
Battcy was commissioned major of the regiment. 
During most of liis service the regiment was sta- 
tioned at dilTorcut points in Georgia and was mii=- 
tered out at Columbus, tliat state, in Janunrv 
1S6G. 

Major Battey also had four sons in the arin_\ : 
Frederick A., who enlisted on the 12tli of Sep- 
tember, ISGl, as a private in Company F, Fifl\- 
seventh Regiment of Illinois Infautrj-, and pass- 
ing through all the successive grades, save that 
of lieutenant, became colonel of his regiment, 
was twice wounded in the battle of Shiloh and was 
once a pri-soncr, being captured at Daltnn, Georgia. 
In command of his regiment i;e.was with Sherman 
on his famous march to the sea. After the close 
of the war he was commissioned first lieutenant 
in the regular army and served with that rank 
until he resigned October :31. 1870. Marshall 
Battey enlisted with his brot'ier Frederick in the 
same company and regiment in the fall of ISGl, 
was promoted to a lieutenancy and afterward 
to a captaincy in the One Hundred and Eleventh 
United States Infantry, serving throughout the 
entire period of hostilities and participating in 
some of the most hotly contested engagements 
of the entire conflict. George and Alon'zo each 
served for about si.x months toward the close of thi> 
war, tlie former as orderly sergeant. 

After retiring from the army ^lajor Battey, 
the father, removed to a farm about a mile west 
of Sheffield which he purchased and upon whicli 
were e.vtensive coal deposits. For a number of 
years he varied his farm pursuits with coal min- 
ing, operating at times quire e.xtensivek. His 
farm was a very valuable property of four hun- 
dred acres, well improved. His business affairs 
were carefully conducted, making him a man 
of considerable wealth, and the methods which 
he followed in trade transactions wore of a natur.' 
that wouM bear the closest investigation ami 
scrutiny. 

On the od of X'oveiiiber, 1SS3, Major Buttcy 
was united in marriage to Aliss Mercy Bennett, 
who was born November 23, 1S14, in the san^' 
township in which her husband's birth occnrr^d. 
Slie was the daughter of George and IMarth.i 
(Wilco.v) Bennett, natives of Providence countv. 
Rhnde Island. Unto Major and 'Mrs. Battey wi '•• 
born fifteen children: Sanford W., Martha ^f-. 



r / 






PAST AND PKESEXT OF BUIIEAU COLJXTY. 



505 



George, Fred.Tiek A, Cyreaii. Beuianl, Marshall, 
S. Alonzo, Betsey M., Liimaeus A., Liunaeus A. 
C-M). Edsoii T.," Jared, Herbert 0. and Elmer 
Iv Of these ten are now living. Betsey M., Lin- 
naeus A. (1st) and Edson T. died vliile young. 
Jared and Herbert 0. died in youn^ manhood. 

31ajor Battey was always interested in commun- 
ity alfairs and in the welfare of state and na- 
tion and his ojiiiiiou was often a decisive factor in 
movements of general moment. While still in 
his native state he was a participant in the 
constitutional troubles in Rhode Island and took 
his stand in favor of the people. He also served 
as deputy sherifl: of Providence county and after 
his removal to Illinois filled various township 
offices in addition to serving. as county sherifT. Tn 
all of these'positions he discharged lii> dntii'^ with 
promjitness and fidelity and was a worthy advo- 
cate of republican principles. Both he and his 
wife were active members of the Unitarian church 
of Sheffield and their aid was freely given to the 
deserving poor and needy, ilajor Battey left 
the impress of his individuality upon general 
affairs in the county, and was an avowed cham- 
pion of progress along material, intellectual and 
moral lines. His deatli, March 14, 1S05, was the 
occasion of deep and widespread regret. He was 
survived by his wife to the 2:3d of September, 1905, 
who had attained, the age of ninety-one years when 
she died. 



WJLLIAil J. YOUXG. 

William J. Young, deceased, was one of the 
prominent and influential residents of Hall town- 
ship. Bureau county, who represented the agricul- 
tural interests of this section of the state. He 
was born in Sclby township, April 20, ISCO, and 
his death occurred in Hall township, February 20, 
1S98, at the comparatively early age of thirty- 
eight years. His parents were William and Mar- 
garet (Albreeht) Young, natives of Germany. 
About 1S50 they left their home in the vicinity of 
ilunich, Bavaria, Germany, and crossed the At- 
lantic to the United States, settling in Selby tomi- 
ship. Bureau county, Illinois, where the father en- 
gaged in general agricultural pursuits and here 
thi.'v spent the remainder of tlieir lives, the father 
dying in 1874, while the motlicr survived for only 
about three months. They had become the par- 
ents of three sons and three daughters, of whom, 
with the exception of William J., all survive, 
namely: jMrs. Lizzie Gehringer, a resident of Ne- 
braska ; ;Mrs. Katherine Werner, of Hall town- 
"^bip ; Henry, residing at Avoca, Nebraska, and 
Jacob and Mrs. Marv Scamon. also living in that 
state. 

William J. Y'oung, whose name introduces this 
rcpord, was reared in hi- native township and 
there acquired a public school education. He grew 
to manhood on a farm and when he started'out 



in lilV' on liis own account be continued to fol- 
low th(^ pursuit of farming, in which he met with 
gratifying success, so that at his death he was 
enaliled to leave to his family -i good farm proji- 
erty, situated on section G, Hall "township, which 
is yet owned and operated liy his widow. 

Mr. Young was married to' Miss Kate Erhart, 
likewise a native of Sclby township, born August 
4, 1861, a daughter of John and J. Barbara 
(Closer) Erhart, both of whom are now deceased. 
The father was born near Munich, Bavaria, Ger- 
numy, June 9, 1829, and when fifteen years of 
age he lost his father. When he attained his 
majority he entered the army, in which he served 
for six years. After his return from the war 
he worked for two years as an apprentice to the 
carpenter's trade, which was his occupation for a 
few years. However, he had heard favorable re- 
ports concerning the United States, and, hoping 
to enjoy better advantages in this country, in the 
spring of 1858, in company with the lady whom 
he afterward married, ho started for America, 
and at once made his way to Illinois, settling in 
Peru. Miss Jfosor ■s\-as also born near ilunicli, 
on the ISth of November, 1824, and on tlie 11th 
of July, 1858, the year of their arrival in this 
country, she gave her hand in marriage to John 
Erliart, the wedding ceremony being performed iu 
the I-utheran clnirch near HoUowayville. They 
took np their abode on a farm near that place, 
where they remained for several years, but later 
removed to a farm on section G, "llall township, 
which is now the home of their daughter, Mrs. 
Young. They were members of the" Lutheran 
clnirch in which they were mai'ried, and for about 
twenty years Mr. Erhart served as one of the 
deacons of the church. His death occurred Febru- 
ary 27, 1905, while his wife passed away the day 
previous, on the 26th, and their funeral services 
were held at the same hour on the 1st of March. 
They were highly respected residents of Hall 
town.ship and when they passed away they were 
mourned by many friends as well as their imme- 
diate family. They had become the parents of 
three daughters and one son, namely: Mrs. John 
Herbolsheimcr, a resident of Selby township; 
Mrs. Katherina Young; John C. Erhart, living in 
Hall township; and Mrs. David HiM'line, a resi- 
dent of Worthington, Minnesota. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Young was blessed 
with four children; Emma, Katie, William and 
John, all at home with their mother. In poli- 
tics Mr. Young was a democrat and socially was 
identified with the Modern Woodmen of America. 
He held membership in the Lutheran church, of 
which his family are also members. He was a 
man of high principle, always working for tht 
best interests of his home locality, arid at the 
same time ho carried on his own private business 
in a progressive and practical manner, so that at 
his death he left to his family a good farm prop- 
erty on section R, Hall township, which continues 



5ot; 



r.\? 



Axn I'i;ks1':xt of h 



KAU COIXTY. 



to be their home. ILe « as always lionest and up- 
riglit ill his business dealings, so that he won 
many business as well as social friends, who felt 
deeply his loss. Mrs. Young possesses sph.'iidid 
business ability so that with the a-i.-iaiiee of her 
sous she is continuing the work .if the fnine farm, 
and she is one of the highly re-jieeted women of 
Bureau eountv. 



MAIAOL-M T. MelXTYUK. 

MaleohiL T. MeJul}re, postmaster of Ladd and 
one of the leading and influential residents of the 
village, was born in ^Middlesex county, Ontario. 
Canada, Xovwuber 30, 1S3G, and is of Scotch 
lineage. Jlis parents, James and Jane (ilclntoshj 
"Mclntyrf, were both natives of Scotland. The 
father went to Canada in ]S"20, iluring his bo}- 
hood days, and his wife in ISls. After attaining 
his majority he engaged in farming in Middlesex 
county until 1S(J-1, when he removed to Douglas 
county, ILUuois, where he carried on general ag- 
ricultural pursuits throughout the remainder of 
his active business life, ile died in that county 
in 1893 at the very venerable age of eighty-seven 
years. 

Ill the public schools of Ontario .Maleolm T. 
Melrityre acquired his education, and reinaiii"d a 
resident of Canada until June, ISo'J. whim he 
removed to Minnesota, \\liere he remained until 
he came to Illinois to assist his father in opening 
up and improving a farm in Douglas county. In 
1870 he went to Iowa, wdiere he engagi'd in farm- 
ing and also worked at the carpenter's trade. In 
1888 he came to Ladd, where he has since resided. 
The White Breast Fuel Company had just b.,en 
organized in Illinois, and was establishing its busi- 
ness, and ilr. Mclnlyre entered its employ and 
assisted in getting ready for active o])erations. For 
three years he remained with that company, after 
which he entered upon an independent business 
career as a contractor and builder, becoming a 
factor in the material improvement of the village. 

Mr. ilclntyre has not only figured in connection 
with the business interests of the town, but has 
also lieen prominent in public aft'airs. He was 
elected aud served as police magistrate, and is 
regarded as one of the leaders iu the local ranks 
of the republican party in this county. He cast 
his first presidential vote for Lincoln one year 
after locating in Minnesota, for at that time the 
declaration of intention of becoming a citizen of 
the United States constituted the legality of the 
vote. On the 7th of August, 1897, he was ap- 
pointed by President JIcKinley postmaster of 
Ladd, then a fourth class but now a third class 
office. He has since filled the position, capably 
administering the work of the otrice, and in all 
places of public trust he is loyal and reliable. 

Mr. Mclntyre was married in Douglas county 
on the 9th of March, 1SG9, to Miss Catherine Sned- 



aker, a native of Illinois, and lliev lia\e heo.iu.. 
the parents of ri\e ehildivii ; La'ura .Mi,-,. il„^ 
wife of Jvlv.ai-d L. Wroten, of Turtle Lake W,,_ 
c.msin; Janus Wiliumi, easlm^r for the ('In, ■;!::,, 
iiui-liu^ti.n .t (,)uin, V K'ailruad Company al n;! 
laua, Illinois; Kdit'h, who died wli-n siu..ai 
montlis ,,ld: hois !•:.. at home; and An-us f^,.,, 
conneeted with the Milwaukee i, St. Paul Kailroa^l 
residing in Madison, Wiseonsin. 

In hi,-, fraternal relations Mr. ilelntyre is a 
Mason, belonging to Arlington lodge, A. V. \ 
A. :M., and afso to the Knights of Pythias lod.v. 
There is no more loj'al son of the United Siair- 
in Bureau county than this adopted sou, who wa.- 
born across the border, but who for many years 
has lived under the protection of the stars and 
stripes, Iielieving in the institutions of the eoiiii- 
try and supporting earnestly and effectivel}' tlm-.. 
principles whieli he believes most comliieive to 
good government. 



GKObTiE W. I.OKT). 

r;e,,r-e \V. Lord, livin- in Tndiantown toun-.hi|., 
where he is engaged exlensivelv and successrall) 
in tlie raising, feediii- and inaiketing of stork, as 
well as in general fanning, i^ one of the native 
sons of this counlv, hi,- bmh having occurred 
August 20, ISGO, in ililo townsliip, two mib-s 
south of his present home. 11 i.- fathei-. Jaines (I. 
Lord, came to Illinois from Ihi.uland in IStl and 
later went to Iowa, but returned to Bureau conni} 
in 1S49. He was an iron molder by traile. an 1 
was employed by King, Hamilton & Cijinpaiiv. of 
Ottawa, Illinois, for several j-ears. He is now \i\- 
ing retired, both he and his wife still oeeiipuni: 
the old home place in Milo township. He o\wi.- 
tw-o hundi-ed and fort\--flve acres of Bureau coun- 
ty's rich land, from wdiich he derives a good in- 
come. Iu the family were six children, of w-honi 
four are now li\ing: George W., of this review; 
Lawrence, wdio is living in Milo township; Jaims. 
a resident of Pasadena, California: and Mrs. liii/a 
La Bryn, of Chicago. 

To the public school svstem of this c(iuiu\ 
George W. Lord is indebted for the education d 
privileges he enjoyed in his youth and wliich fitted 
him for life's practical duties. He early became fa- 
miliar with the labors of the farm, and has always 
engaged in agricultural pursuits and stock-raising. 
In connection with his brother-in-law, Mr. Foster, 
he lias also operated a threshing machine andeoiu- 
sheller for a number of years, and he is largely 
engaged in the feeding of cattle, hogs and horses, 
which he buys, feeds and ships. He annually p'lr- 
ehases large amounts of corn for feeding purp'^-^- ;. 
and as he keeps his stock in good comlition he ha- 
no trouble in disposing of it at the highest iiiark''t 
prices. 

In early manhood Mr. Lord was marri..d to .Mi-- 



/ ..... 



iiri. AM) itKS. -M. T. ifelXTYKE. 



PAST AXD PL'ESEXT OF BUEHAU COUNTY 



509 



Margaret Cooper, of InJiaiuown township, a 
ilaughtcf of George and Ann (McElroy) Cooper, 
lloi' father was bora in Engla.nd aurl came to Illi- 
nois about 1S4S, settling near where his daughter 
now resides. The mother was born in Ireland. 
'I'liey were the parents of six children, all of whom 
are living; Mrs. Sarah J. Townsley, a resident of 
Iowa; John, who makes his home near ilr. Lord; 
George, of Bradford, Illinois; ilrs. Lord; Mrs. 
Mary Mellor, living in Castleton, Illinois; and 
Mrs. ilattie Foster, the wife of James Foster, liv- 
ing on the old home farm. The parents are now 
deceased. 

The marriage of Mi-, and Mrs. Lord has been 
bloss.'d with four daughters: Clara, llatiie, 
Blanche and Mabel. The family have a wide and 
favorable acquaintance in their part of the coun- 
try. Mr. Lord is a republican who discharges his 
duties of citizenship with a sense of conscientious 
o!)ligation. He belongs to the Modern Woodmen 
camp at Bradford and through social, business and 
j)(..litical relations has nurde a creditable name. 



HENEY G. WELLS. 

Henry G. Wells is the owner of a beautiful home 
pleasantly and conveniently located within a half 
mile of the village of Dover, where everything con- 
tributing to happiness and comfort may be found. 
He is numbered among the representative agri- 
culturists of his county and is, moreover, one of 
its native sons, having been born August 21, 1843, 
in a log cabin on the farm where he now resides 
and which has been the family home through 
many decades. 

He is a sou of George Wells, who was born in 
Chenango county, Xew York, in ISOG and in 
lS-10 came to Illinois, making the trip in a covered 
wagon and reaching his destination after six week« 
spent upon the road. He found here a pioneer dis- 
trict devoid of many of the evidences of improve- 
ment and advancement known to the older east. 
The settlers were obliged to transport the products 
of the farm to Chicago with teams and there pur- 
chase their supplies. Postage on a letter was 
twenty-five cents and was always collected at its 
destination, and tl\e price of a bushel of wheat was 
only enough to. buy a postage stamp. George Wells 
was united in marriage to Frances Donaldson, 
whose uncle, Asa Donaldson, her father's brother, 
was one of the first pastors of the Congregational 
church at Dover. They had one son, Itev. George 
H. Wells, who became a distinguished minister of 
the Congregational church and died in 1S97. He 
was graduated successively from Dover Academy, 
from Amherst College of Masachusetts and from 
Chicago Theological Seminary, in which he com- 
pleted his course in the class of 1SG7. For three 
and a half years he was pastor of the Congrega- 
tional church at Araboy, Illinois, and was pastor 
of the American Presbvterian church at Montreal, 



Canada, for tweuiy-two years. He was also pastor 
of the Plyiuouth Congregational church at Min- 
neapolis, Minnesota, for three and a half years 
and afterward started upon a tour around the 
world, but returned from Japan to the United 
States on account of ill health. He was a dis- 
tinguished divine, a man of broad scholarly at- 
tainments and was recognized as an inilueutial 
factor in the church. He met an accidental death, 
being killed by the cars at Milwaukee, \\'isconsin, 
in 1897. 

Henrv G. Wells was reared to manhood in the 
usual manner of farmer lads, whose time was de- 
voted to the work of the fields and to the duties 
of the schoolroom. His early education was sup- 
plemented by study in Dover Academy and he has 
made farming his life work, being today the 
owner of a valuable property comprising two hun- 
dred and thirty-five acres of rich and productive 
land. This is the old homestead farm upon which 
he was born fifty-ciglit years ago. His time and 
energies are devoted to the raising of grain and 
stock and everything about his place is kept in 
excellent condition. He uses the latest improved 
machinery to facilitate the work of the fields, 
keeps only high gi-ade stock and has added to his 
farm substantial buildings, having a beautiful resi- 
dence within a half mile of the village of Dover. 

In Xovembcr, 1870, Mr. Wells was united in 
marriage to Miss ilary Arnold, who was born near 
Hartford, Connecticut, in October, 1847. Four 
children grace this marriage: Mrs. Frances Moody, 
now living in Xorthfield, Massachusetts; Mrs. Ad- 
eline Anderson, a resident of Chicago; Mrs. Euth 
Williams, of Bushford, Minnesota; and Mrs. 
Miriam Beeves, of Tower City, Xorth Dakota, 
whoso husband is in the employ of the government 
in the entomological department of agrictdture. 

In his political views Mr. Wells is independent, 
considering men and measures rather than party 
in casting his ballots. He is a member of the 
Congregational church, with which he has been 
coimected for fifty years, and his labors have been 
effective in promoting its growth and extending 
its influence, while to its support he has been a 
liberal contributor. He has prospered in his busi- 
ness undertakings and his capable matiagement of 
his interests has made him a substantial citizen. 
He raises grain and stock, buying and feeding cat- 
tle and hogs and is a well known stockman, who 
has met with success in his chosen field of labor. 



J. C. SITTERLY. 

J. C. Sitttjrly, who is engaged in the livery busi- 
ness in Spring A'alley, is numbered among the 
native sons of Illinois, having been born in 
Grundy county on the 19th of August, ISCO. His 
parents were M. H. and Isabolle (Watson) Sit- 
terly, the fonner a native of the state of Xew 
York and the latter of Pennsylvania. In 1856 



510 



I'A.S'J 



AM 



iMJl 



EST OF m i;l:ai' cuu.x'J'Y 



tho lather became a i-L-iidi'iit of Giuii.lv eoiiiuy. 
Illinois, where ho eiigai^'iNl in bu.-iiu'.-s a.s a loii- 
traetor and builder. 

lu ISH the familv iviiio\od ti,,m (Inuidv to 
Will county, lilinois, and .1. C. Sitliily was edu- 
cated in the public sehnuls thi.-iv. On the cnm- 
p\eU<m of his rduratu'ii he ua. cuiplowd bv the 
Chira-o. Wihniimtnii \- VrnnUli.m Coal Cnnpauv 
fur ll\l' jears m its vioiv. and on so^eriii- his cou"- 
nection with that coi-jne-ation lie took eliarge of 
two stores, ownod l,v ihr Pluioka Coal (;onii.anv, 
one at Braidunud and the .ithur al Trary. lie 
rcinainrd in that ea[iarii\ t\<v (nuf voars. aft^r 
whirh hr wont to IiaM-n|M.,t. loua. i.iil uh.n a 
bri,'f pr,-i,,d had pas^o.l in that citv h.' .-anif tn 
Spriii- \"anov and in 1 S,ss ,,siahlish.Ml a liNorv 
-4jarn,VhRh lie has sin.v ...ndurled. W, has bouii 
successful in liis husiiu'-,- lift; li'Tr and now ha^ 
a number of linrM.- and a i;iiiid Jinr of carriages 
and other vehicle.-, wluli' his caiairst desire to 
please his i.atn.n-. a- w.ll a. hi- ivliaMe busine.-s 

methods liaVc hrrll a fralllU' in hl> .-llrcr.-,.. 

On the Gth of Jiinr, l.so:,. M,. ,Sltll•rl^ wa> mar- 
ried to Miss Lizzie Nelson, a daughter of .lanir- 
Kelson, an old resident of Bureau county. \\]i<> 
affiliates with tho Congregational chunh and is 
a representative resident of this part of the state. 
His wife bore the maiden name of Mary Barrett 
and was a native of Ohio. Tliree sons and a daugh- 
ter have been born unto ^Ir. and ]\rrs. Silterly: 
Harry, who was born June G, KSin;. aiul died 1 )e- 
fcmber 13, 1S9G; Glenn, hoin AiiLriist •.'<;, IS'.K ; 
Ada, June IG, 1S9'J ; and Lvle, Septend.er 11, 
190-2. 

Mr. Sitterly exercises liis riglit of franchise m 
support of the nuju and measures of tlie repub- 
lican party and is now serving for the fifth teini 
as alderman of the fifth ward. He uses his official 
prerogatives for the best interests of the town 
and his labors have been effective and far-reaching 
for its benefit. He affiliates with tlie Congrega- 
tional church and is a highly respected man, whose 
life record will bear close investigation and scru- 
tiny and will show forth many qualities worthy 
of emulation. 



HKXBY DIXTEMAX, 

Among the honored residents of Bureau coun 
that Germany has furnished to the new woi-ld 
numbered Henry Duntenian, who was for mat 
3^cars actis"ely idenfified with the agricultural i 
"terests of the countv but f.u- the past decade h 
lived retired, though still residing upon hi.s fat 
on section 1-5, Selby t(nvii.-~hi[). ~He was born 
Hanover. Germany, in IS'VJ. and is a son 
-Henry Duuteman, Sr., a very successful man, w' 
engaged in fanning and also owned and oporat 
a large mill. The father t.H.k jiait in the w 
against Napoleon on the Briti-h side, llanov 
then being under En-lish piui ■. tiou. lie nev 



came t" .\meiiea but ti\e of his eight sons became 
residents of the L'niteil States and two of the num- 
ber are still livin-. ih.'.-e belli- llenrv. of this re- 
view, and Krnest'. wlm is als.. living retired m 
S.'lby township. 

Henry Duntemaii, Jr., spent the first sixteen 
years of his life in his naiive land and from tlie 
as:e of six until fourteen he attended the public 
school, after which he uas bound out for two 
yeai> tn leaiii the juinei\- trade. On eoniiug to 
the I'niti'd Stale- in ISlo. lie llr.,t. buated in New 
York stall', niana-ing a ( eoperage there for about 
a year, and in 1 •> I : went to Chicago but soon after- 
ward bleated at W'llniinglim, Illinois, where he 
spent a few weeks. Jle next work'ed for some time 
at .Morn-, tin- slate, ami uas later employed on a 
coiitraet at Depue, ha\ iiig made his home in Bu- 
reau county since lS-19. lie accompanied his em- 
ployer on the latler's removal to Princeton, where 
he worked for several months, and subscipieiilly 
was employed on the farm of Beujamin Xewell for 

111 IS.^l Mr. Duntemaii was married and began 
farming on his own aeeoiini, iirsi purchasing forty 
acres of land with the mone\- he hail saved from 
his earnings. A year later lie sold that tract and 
Ijimghl one liumired and sixty acres on section 
l."i. Selby tiiwii.-bip, a jiarl of which he still owns. 
As time has passi'd he has made many useful and 
substantial iinpiii\enients to his place and suc- 
eessfully eiigageil in its operation until about ten 
\ears aue. when he retired from active farming 
and now ivnt- his land. 

Mr. niintcmau was married in 18.51 to Miss 
Aliiieda l.oim. ubo was born in Greene eotintv, 
Ohio. ,n is-i. a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Heiiry 
Louu. who came to Hureau eouiitv in l.-^l'i, locat- 
ing HI Selb\ tnun-hip, wlu'l-e thev'madi' their hoille 
until their" death.- .-ome yeai- a.uo. They h.ld a 
lai'ge family luit only three are now living, namely: 
Mrs. l)untenian: Mrs. I'lper and Mrs. Andrew 
Walton, of Selby township. Mr. and Mrs. l>unte- 
inan lia\e reared three children, all born in Bu- 
reau county: John, now a farmer of Selby town- 
ship, who married Lizzie Foouey and had one 
daughter, now deceased; Cherrv, who is at home 
with her parents; and B. X.."also a farmer of 
Selby township, who married Melissa Hosier and 
has eight children. 

During the Civil war ilr. Duntemaii was drafted 
and hired a substitute, paying eight huudred dol- 
lars. By liis ballot he has sujiported the repub- 
lican party since its organization and has taken 
quite an acti\e interest in local affairs, efficiently 
ser\ing as justice of the peace for twenty-four 
vears anil as road commissioner fifteen years. Fra- 
Ternallv he is connected with the ilasonic lodge at 
F^-incetoii and he attends the Congregational 
church thou-b reared in the Lutheran faith, lie 
is a man highly res[)ected and esteemed by all 
who ke.ow him and deserves great credit for the 



FAST AND PKESKXT OF LriiKAT' COUXTY. 



511 



L-css that he h 



his p 



-l-crily 



A. (JImsc) Cai'peuter, were both 
^imiiiie state. 'J'he father was born 

iiiplc 



GKOIJGP] i;. l.'R'HAKDSON, D. I). S. 

J>r. George K. Eidiara.sou, engaged in the prae- 
tire of dentistry in Princeton, liis native city, was 
born February 2"^*, 1808, a son of P. 1'. and Eiiie- 
liiie (Wise) Itieliardsou, the former a native of 
.\[iehigan and the latter of }\ew Jersey. In the 
early 'GOs tlic father came to Princeton and en- 
gaged in the hardware business, being for many 
years an active factor in coinmei\'ial cireh"'s. His 
I'siablishnieiLt was one of tlie well known hi.nd- 
niarlvS of conuuereialisni in Princeton for aliih>=l a 
tliird of a century and in 1900 lie retired fr.jrn 
business life, enjoviiig well earned iv-.-;t to the tinie 
of his death,' which occnrred in 1003. 

Dr. Piichardson, entering tlie pul)lic schools at 
the usual age, passed through successive grades 
until lie was graduated from the high scliool of 
Princeton and his professional training was re- 
ceived in the dental departnietn of tin' Noi-iliwest- 
crn University at Chicago, fi'mi wlmli lie was 
graduated in the class of 1SI>S. lie iTin.iii'.ed fur 
two years in Chicago and then took up the pi-ae- 
tice in his native city in I'JOO, winning siiccos as 
the years have gone by until he is now accorded a 
ve.-y liberal and gratifying jjatronage. With broad 
understanding of the scientific principles of the 
profession, with the mechanical ingenuity and ac- 
curacy which secure the best woi'k, combined with 
that faculty which is termed commercial sense, he 
is meeting with well merited success and is worthy 
the jiati'onage which is accorded him. He belongs 
to the county and state dental societies and is in- 
terested in all that pertains to progress in his jiro- 
fession, readily adapting the new methods and 
advanced ideas v,"hich mark the ad\ancenient of 
the profession. 

In 1901 Dr. Eichardsou was married to Mi^s 
Frances Jordan, a native of ilaryhuid and a 
daughter of William H. Jordan. This marriage 
has been blessed with two daughters. Frances ^lary 
and Sarah Weise. The Doctor and his wife are 
members of the Presbyterian church and are well 
known socially, he having many friends who have 
known him from his boyhood, for almost his en- 
tire life has been pa.?sed in Princeton. 



n.VPLAX E. CAKPJ':XTFi;. 
Harlan E. Cai-penter, whose life has been de- 
voted to farming and stock-raising with the re- 
sult that a gratifying measure of success has 
crowned his efforts, so that he is now the o\\-ner of 
a good farm property in Neponset township, was 
born in ^ilacon townsliip. on section 30, his natal 
day being Octolur 1(5, ISVl. Flis parents, William 



E. and ].au 
natives of ih 

near Virgil, 'i'ouiplcins ci>univ. New York, Octc 
17, IS-il. and married Miss Laura A. Pose, wdiose 
birth occurred in !']\;ui-:, Erie county, iS'ew Y'ork, 
ifareh 20, ISi:;. The wedding was" celebarted at 
Sycamore, !).• Kail, cuntv. Illinois, Januarv 11, 
l.^i;'.). :\lis. CariM.iit.M' was a dauuht.M- of Orange 
and Pc'Mv.a (llunl) Pose. Her lather was born 
in ChautaiKjua county, Xew York, and died in 
Xovember, ]S-i 1, while his wife, a native of Madi- 
son countv, Xew York, pa.-^sed awav in June, 1814. 
They were married in the Empire state and be- 
came rr-idriits uf l)e Kalb cnuntv, Illinois, in 
181(3. Mr. i;o>e was a hn^cr by professinn and 
had gained a p'l.-ition of prominence at the De 
Kalb couiiiy bar when, in early manhood, he was 
calh'il from thi^ life. ^Mrs. Carpenter was the only 
child of his niai-iiagc. The paternal grandparents 
of our siibJL'Lt were Henry and Isabella (Sloan) 
Cai-iienlrr, the furmer born in Tom|>kins countv, 
Xew York, aii.l the lall.T in .■a>lern Xew York. 
Ill, dealli o>vurn.,l m isn, and hi> wife parsed 
away in Augn-l. isss. rmo their marriage w-ere 
born nine rhildren. six of wlioiii reached adult ago. 
He came west w ith his family in 18.51, settling first 
in Kane county, Illinois, when, in 18(50, he re- 
moveil to Bureau county, wdiere he spent his re- 
maining davs a-; a farmer. 

William ']■:. Cai-penter, father of Harlan E. Car- 
penter, came with his parents to Illinois, was 
reared to faim life and soon after his marriage he 
built the house \ihich is now occupied by his widow- 
on section 3ti, ilacon township. Tliis was in 1SG9, 
and it has remained the family home continuously 
since. His entire life was devoted to general farm- 
ing and stock-raising and he made a specialty of 
the breeding of shorthorn Durham cattle. He be- 
lieved it much more profitable to raise high grade 
stock than those of an inferior grade, and he also 
bred a high grade of hogs and was a lover of good 
horses. In community affaii's he took an active 
and helpful intere.-t. >erwii,u- as a school trustee 
and as road coip,mis-ii.)ner. He was also an active 
member of the ilethodist Episcopal church of Xe- 
ponset for about thirty years, served as class leader 
for a consid.erahle period and was Sunday-school 
superintendent for one 3-ear. He contributed gen- 
erously to the support of the church and did ev- 
erything in his power to promote its growth and 
development. In his political views he was a 
stanch republican but never was active as an office 
seeker. He died June 25, 1891, respected by all 
who knew him. In the familv were two children, 
Harlan E. and Xellio P. The daughter, born 
ilarch 28. 18:i;, was married December 30, 1897, 
to Louis L. Peniiett. Thefo are three children of 
this union, I.esli^. H., Slella A. and William E. 

In his boyhofid days Harlan E. Carpenter 
worked upon the home farm and during the school 
sessions pursued his studies in a district school of 
the neishborhood until nineteen years of age. He 



51-; 



PAST AND PKESENT OF BUREAU COU.XTY. 



lost lii.s f;ulier at that time and has siiux' giwu un- 
divided attention to the i'arniing and stock-raising 
interests of the old homestead. He is accoimtcd 
one of the enterprising and sueeessful agricultur- 
ists of his comnumity and the neat and tlirifty ap- 
pearance of liis place indicates his careful super- 
vision. In all his business transactions he is 
straightforward and relialile and he has made for 
himself an unassailable reputation in business cir- 
cles. Following in his father's footsteps politically 
he is an earnest republican and in 1903 was 
chosen township collector, -svhilc in 190.3 he was 
elected assessor, wliicli position he is now fdliug. 
His official duties have been discharged with 
promptness and fidelity and his aid can always 
be counted upon to further any movement for the 
'general good. He was made a JIason in Xcpouset 
lodge, Xo. SO.j, A. F. & A. il., on the lOtli of 
July, 1S93, and has since been an exemplary rep- 
resentative of the craft. 



WILLIAM WILLlAilS. 

Enterprise, keen foresight and judicious inscit- 
ment constitute the success of William Williams, 
who is a wealthy citizen of Bureau count}, -where 
he owns extensive landed interests, aggregating 
nine hundred and fifty acres, situated in La 
Moille township. He is a native of this township, 
having been born on his present farm on the Sth 
of July, 18-54, a son of James H. and Elizabeth 
(Shirk) AVilliams, natives of West Virginia and 
Peimsylvania respectively. In the year 1848 the 
father came to Illinois, settling in Canton, Fulton 
county, where he resided for four years, and on 
the expiration of that period he removed with his 
family to La ^Moille township, Bureau county. In 
their family were six children, of whom the sub- 
ject of this review is the third in order of birth. 

William Williams, whose name introduces this 
sketch, received a contmon-school education in La 
Moille township and afterward pursued the high- 
school coitrse at Princeton, Illinois, thus being well 
qualified to enter business life. He started out in 
business as a farmer and, though he inherited 
some property, he has through industry, integrity 
and good judgment added to his original holdings 
until he is now one of the extensive landowners of 
Bureau county, having nine hundred and fifty 
acres of fine land situated in La ifoille township. 
Here he carries on general agricultural pursuits, 
raising the cereals best adapted to soil and cli- 
mate, and using the latest improved farm ma- 
chinery to facilitate his work, so that he annually 
gathers rich crops as the result of his well directed 
labor. He has added many modern improvenrents 
to his place, including a beautiful country resi- 
dence, which is supplied with all modern con- 
veniences and is surrounded by fine shade trees 
and substantial outbuiWinss for the shelter of 



grain and stock, and allogetlier his is one of the 
model farms of this section of the state. 

As a companion and helpmate on life's journey 
j\Lr. Williams chose Jliss Sarah Crossinau, to 
whom he was married Xovember 7, 1877. She 
was born July 3, 1854, a daughter of John ami 
Elizabeth Crossraau, natives of England, whence 
they came to America in an early day, becuniiny 
residents of Bureau county. Here Mrs. Williams 
was reared and educated, she being the second 
child in a family of nine children. By her mar- 
riage she has become the mother of four sons, 
namely: Harrv C, born October 3, ],S7s' 
Charles, October' 9, lSS-3; ilark, October 3, ls,si^ 
and Glen, born July 14, 1S9.D. 

Mr. Williams is independent in politics, suji- 
porting the men whom he thinks best qualified to 
fill oflice regardless of party ties. While keeping 
thoroughly informed on political questions and 
issues of the day he is not active in party work, 
preferring to give his time to his private businc.-s 
interests, in which he has met with excellent suc- 
cess. His wife holds membership witli the L'liiteJ 
Brethren church at Van Orin. 

Mr. Williams resides on the old homestead, 
and, having spent his entire life in this county, 
has aided in the development and progress that 
has here been made. He possesses excellent busi- 
ness ability and today he is one of the most exten- 
sive landholders of Bureau county, having nine 
hundred and fifty acres of valuable land situated 
in La Moille township. He is assisted in his farm 
work by his sons, whom he has trained to habits 
of industry and economj-, so that he is able to rest 
somewhat from the more arduous tasks of carry- 
ing on the work of the property. He has a beauti- 
ful country residence, over which Mrs. Williams 
presides in a hospitable manner. He is quiet and 
unassuming, one whom it is a pleasure to meet, 
giving to both friend and stranger a cordial wel- 
come, ilr. and Mrs. Williams are excellent peo- 
ple, enjoying the highest esteem of all who know 
thoin, and their acnuaintanco is extensive. 



MARIOX DOTY. 
Clarion Doty, one of the worthy ami repre- 
sentative citizens of Berlin township, always help- 
ful and interested in matters of public progiv-s, 
while at the same time carefully and successfully 
conducting his individual business interests, is a 
native of the neighboring state of Indiana, hi- 
birth having occurred in Steuben county on tic 
loth of August, 1SG3. He is a son of Henry and 
Rebecca A. fllite) Doty, the former a native i':' 
the state of Xew York, while the latter was a!-' 
born in the east. In their family were seven cliil- 
dren, of whom Marion was the fifth in order •'>' 
birth. Two of the number died in childhi>"h 
When their son .Marion was thirteen years of ::.-■■ 
the parents left the beautiful lake regions of St''"- 



WlLLlAK WiLLIAf 




MR. AX1» Mi;S. J. H. Wir.T.lAMS. 



TAST AND PKESENT OF BUliEAU COUNTY. 



517 



bfU county, Iiidiaua, and romoved to Cireene coun- 
ty, JIi?souri, Mhere tliey lived for four and a half 
years. On thi' expiration of that period they re- 
traced their slops to Steuben county, Indiana, but 
llariou Doty stopped in Bureau county, Illinois, 
where he has remained continuously since, a wor- 
thy and respected resident of this part of the state. 

In consequence of his parents' removals Mr. 
Doty spent his boyhood daj's at various intervals 
in Indiana, Missouri and Illinois and for about 
twenty-five years has made his homo in Bureau 
county. Here, starting out in life on his own ac- 
count, he chose as a companion and helpmate for 
the journey Miss Bettie M. Dancy, to whom he 
was married on the 18th of November, 18SG. She 
was born September 28, 18C1, and her parents 
both died iii this county, but passed away many 
years ago. When six years of age she went to live 
with John M. Isaac, who gave her a home until 
her marriage. Unto Jlr. and Mrs. Doty have been 
horn three children : Conway L., Vera M. and Lee 
E., aged respectively eighteen, sixteen and eight 
vcars. 

The family residence is upon a farjii in Berlin 
township and Mr. Doty is one of the self-made 
men of the county, who has forged liis way to the 
front among the representative agricultu lists of 
his community as the result of hard and unremit- 
ting toil and honesty whicli is above question. He 
is a man of sterling worth, measuring up with 
the foremost, not because of the acres which he 
owns but because of a strong and sturdy charac- 
ter which commands unqualified respect and con- 
fidence. In his religious views he and his family 
are C'ongregationali^ts, having recently joined the 
church of that deuomiruition at Dover. They were 
brought to take this step through the influence of 
Rev. AVilliam Sunday, the noted Evangelist, who 
held revival services in Priiiceton in the winter of 
190.5-0. Mr. Doty is a member of Dauiitless lodge. 
No. 1.50, K. P., of Maiden, Illinois. The cause of 
education finds in him a warm and stalwart friend 
and an able helper, who has done effective service 
in behalf of the public schools through twelve 
years' service on the school board. He stands for 
all that is progressive in the comTiiunity and for 
all that is just and upright in man's relations with 
his fellowmeu and his many sterling traits have 
gained him warm friendships. His political alle- 
giance is gi/en to the republican pjrty. 



BOY L. FAIBBANKS. 
Roy L. Fairbanks, who is engaged in the furni- 
ture and undertaking business in Buda, v.-as born 
in that village, June 2-i, 1882, and is a representa- 
tive of old pioneer families of this part of the 
state. His paternal grandparents were Alexander 
H. and Catherine (Purdue) Fairbanks. The for- 
mer was born in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, Septem- 
ber 8, ISOT, and was married oh the 2d of Febru- 



ary, 1832, to Catherine Purdue, ^Uiose birth oc- 
curred in Ne\^- York city, February 2, 1813. He 
came to Bureau county in 1855 and followed the 
occupation of carpentering and farming, retaining 
his residence here until his death, which occurred 
March IG, ISSG. His wife survived huu for about 
ten years, passing away January 22, 1896. In 
their family were eleven children, of whom four 
are yet living: ^\jnanda, born December 25, 1832; 
Thomas, born March IS, ISSlj Sewell, September 
25, IStl; and James 0., March 7, 1853. There 
were five sons who served in the Union army dur- 
ing the Civil war, but all have now passed away 
with the exception of the eldest, Thomas, who now 
resides at Clay Center, Iowa. 

Lorenzo D. Fairbanks, father of our subject, 
was born at "Wright Corners, iu Indiana, February 
2, 1S3G, was reared in the usual manner of farm 
lads on the frontier and came with his parents to 
Illinois in 1855. On the 27th of January, 1858, at 
Boyd's Grove, in Bureau county, he married Miss 
^Martha Anii Gordon, who was born iu Putnam 
county, Indiana, January 15, 1842, and is a daugh- 
ter of Granville and Eveline (Sutherland) Gor- 
don, both of wlionr are now deceased. They came 
to Illinois in the early '50s and were pioneer set- 
tlers of Isjiox count}', whence they af';erward came 
to Bureau county and in 1SC3 they went to Indi- 
ana, where their remaining days were passed. They 
had five children, of whom three are now living, 
namely: Mrs. Fairbanks; Margaret; and Priscilla. 

Soon after his marriage Lorenzo D. Fairbanks 
began farming on his own account in Macon town- 
ship and carried on general agricultural pursuits 
until 1873, when he removed to Kewanee, where 
he established a furniture store, which he con- 
ducted until ISSl. In that year he took up his 
abode in Buda, where he spent his remaining days 
in the furniture and undertaking business. He 
served in the L'nion army toward its close, enlist- 
ing on the 11th of February, 1865, for one year 
or during the war, as a private of Company K, 
One Hundred and Forty-eighth Regiment of Illi- 
nois Volunteers. He received an honorable dis- 
charge at Nashville, Tennessee, as sergeant, on the 
5th of September, 18G5. He held membership in 
the Odd Fellows lodge and also with the Good 
Templars and ^vas a member of the Congregational 
church. All who knew him respected him, for his 
life was ever upright and honorable. He died 
November 25, 1900, and is still survived by his 
widow, who is now living in Buda. They were 
the parents of six children: George E., born Au- 
gust 10, 1861; Eddie E., who was born Mav 10, 
1863, and died March 29, 1804; Thomas W.,' who 
was born February 4, 1867, and died February 6, 
1898, losing his life while acting as engineer, a 
wreck occurring on the Grand Trunk Railroad at 
Imlay City, Michigan; James E., who was born 
April 9, 1869, and is now a music professor in Bos- 
ton; Nellie J., who was born September 24, 1872, 
and died in inf.mcy; and Roy L., of this review. 



518 



PAST AXL) rJM-lSEXT 01-" JU'JIKAL' COUXTY. 



In taking up tlie |irrsonal histury of liny Ij. 
Fairbanks we pivseiit to our readers the reeunl of 
a representative of one of tlie old pioneer families 
of the' county and one who lias justl}- gained for 
himself a creditalde jilaee in Imsiness cireles in 
Buda. He pursued hi. edueati..n in tlie lUida 
schools, and afterwatil ma,-terod a course in the 
art and science of emlialiuiuu and fmierai direet- 
ing at Boston, Ma-achuseits with David Fudge 
& Son. lie also took a |i>i<t-Lrraduale course un- 
der Professor Carl Lewis J'.arn. s nf C'hieago in 
1903, and he at present lipids a sMt./ license issued 
by tlie Illinois stale i.oard v( healtli. On the 1st 
of October, 1903, he engaged in the furniture and 
undertaking business mi hi,- oun aicmiiit a-> suc- 
cessor to his father and mnv earries a line line ai 
fu4-niture and uikIli taking guods. ][e is well 
ecpiipped for the condiu t i>l' a snecessfnl Iju-iness 
in this way and has leei-nily purehased a new fu- 
neral car and an amliulaiiee. He carries a largo 
line of furniture aiul has a liberal jiatronage ow- 
ing to liis reasonable pric-s and his earnest dtsire 
to please his customers. 

lu his fraternal relations Mr. Fairljanks is a 
Mason, belonging to Buda lodge, Xo. 399, A. F. 
& A. ;\L, and Princeton chapter, Xo. 28, K. A. M. 
He also afliliatcs with Arena lodge, Xo. G-15, K. P., 
of Buda, and he is a niember of the Illinois State 
Undertakers' Association. 

On the 2-lth of June, 1903, Mr. Fairbanks was 
married to ^liss Grace C. Aten, who was born at 
Brimficld, Illinois, July 28, 1SS3. They now have 
an interesting little daughter, Lucile Vincent, born 
December G, 190.j. ^[rs. Fairbanks is a daughter 
of Vincent and Mary E. (Snyder) Aten. Her 
father, a native of Xew Jersey, is now living in 
Eansom, La Salle county, Illinois, and is a minis- 
ter of the Methodist Episcopal church, lia\ing 
charge of three churches. His wife is a native of 
Boonville, Missouri. In their family were five 
children, of whom three are now living: Fred S., 
Grace aud Warren B. Mr. and Mrs. Fairijonks 
are prominent socially in Buda, wliere their circle 
of friends is almost co-extensive with the circle 
of their acquaintances. 



EDGAE D. LARKIX. 

The commercial prosperity and community in- 
terests of Arlington are greatly promoted through 
the activity of Edgar D. Larkin, who for ten 
years has served as postmaster of the village and 
is proprietor of its leading general store. He is 
honored and respected by all because of the suc- 
cess which he has achieved and by reason of the 
straightfonvard liusiness methods ho has ever fol- 
lowed. He was born July 29, 18-33, in Harris- 
ville, Harrison county, Ohio, and his parents, 
Townsend T. and Julia Anne (Piichardson) Lar- 
kin, were also natives of the same state. In the 
year 185.5 they removed from Ohio to Bureau 



county, Illinois, settling in the village of Arling- 
ton, where the father followed the trade of cabiuJt- 
niaking. He thus became closely associated with 
its industrial interests, aud was a representative 
citizen there for many years, or until the day of 
his death. lie passed away in ISTG at the age uf 
seM.'Uty-four years, his birth having occurred in 
ISO-,', the year in which Ohio, his native slate, 
was admilt''d to the Union. His wife fiassed 
awa\ at tlu; age of sixty-eight years. On the 
seventieth aniii\ er:,ary of the birth of Townsend 
T. Larkin the family held a reunion at the old 
homestead at Xewtown Square, Pennsylvania, the 
date being May 1, 1873. On this occasion th-ie 
were present all of his living brothers and sifters, 
including Mrs. I'enncU, Mordecai Larkin, Mrs. 
Eliza L. Thoi!ias, Mrs. Hannah Sharpless, Mrs. 
ilartha Yost and John Larkin, Jr. The last 
time a family reunion liad been held was on the 
•")th of May, 1824, forty-eight years previously, 
at the inaniago of one ot the sisters. On that oc- 
casion all of tlie children, ten in number, were 
present, but in the interim death had reino\'od 
three, so that the living members of the family 
numored seven, of whom the youngest was sixty- 
eight years of age. All are now deceased, and tin.' 
youngest, who at that gathering was sixty- 
eiglit years of age, lived to be ninety years of 
age, passing away in 1904. 

Edgar D. Larkin, reared under the parental 
roof, completed his education in the Arlington 
schools and afterward learned the jeweler's trade, 
which he followed for a number of years in the 
village which is now his home. In 1880, however, 
he went to the west, and was identified v.-ith 
mining interests until the succeeding fall, when 
he returned to Arlington, where he has since en- 
gaged in merchandising. He has prospered in hi- 
undertakings and is today the owner of the lead- 
ing general mercantile establishment in the town. 
He carries an extensive and well selected stock 
of goods, and his reasonable prices, straightfor- 
ward dealing and earnest desire to please his cus- 
tomers have secured to him a large patronage, 
making the business a profitable investment. He 
likewise owns eleven and a half acres of land in 
the village, and upon this place his residence 
stands, being one of the attractive homes of the 
town. 

On the 3d of May, 1877, Mr. Larkin was mar- 
ried to Miss Alferetta Berr}", who was born A]<ril 
1, 1S57, and is a daughter of Kufus B. and Julia 
A. (O'Brien) Berry, the former a native of Elaine 
and the latter of London, England. They became 
residents of Bureau county in the later '403, and 
resided in Clarion township upon a farm up t" 
the time of Mr. Berry's death. His widow still 
survives and is now living in X'ew York city. 
The marriage of Mr. and Jlrs. Larkin has been 
blessed with four children : Justin E., Blanche K., 
Juliet and Townsend T., who are still under the 
parental roof. 




EDGAT; 1). LAKKLN. 



PAST AND FKESEXT OF BUllEAU COUXTY. 



521 



For many years 'Mt. Larkin has been au exem- 
plary member of the Masonic fraternity,, and is 
affiliated with Ijevi Lnsk lodge, No. 270, A. F. 
& A. M., of which he has been treasurer for 
about ten years. He is now veneralile counsel 
of the Modern Woodmen camp, No. 3111, and 
in his fraternal rehitions is popular. His father 
organized the Temple of Honor of Harrisville, 
Ohio, and afterward asisted in instituting various 
lodges in that state. He, too, was a prominent 
Mason. In his political views Edgar ]>. Larkin 
is a stalwart republican, and for eight years acted 
as assistant postmaster of Arlington, while for the 
past ten years he has served as postmaster. He 
is also one of the trustees of the village, having 
been elected for a two years' term. His first pres- 
idential ballot was east for General Grant, and 
he has since supported each nominee at the head 
of the ticket, while in local interests of his party 
he is recognized as a leader, his opinions often 
proving a decisive factor in republican councils 
in Bureau county. His intense and well directed 
activity in business has gained him his present 
position in commercial circles, while his veil 
known public spirit and devotion to the general 
good have made hiir. a prominent repicrciitative 
of the citizenship of Arlincrton. 



WILLIAM S. JIATTESOX. 

William S. Matteson, one of the leading and 
representative residents of La Moille township, 
was born in this county, January 29, 1867. His 
parents were Theodore B. and Elizabeth (Harris) 
Matteson, the former a native of Oswego, New 
York, and the latter of Tuscarawas county, Ohio. 
They were married in Bureau county, Illinois, in 
1860, and unto them have been born two children : 
AVilliam S. and Bertha B. 

The son, reared under the parental roof, was 
educated in the public schools of this county and 
in Fulton College, of Fulton, Illinois "\Mien not 
busy with his text-books his time was de- 
voted to the pleasures of the playground or 
to the work of the fields, for in his youth 
he assisted in the improvement and operation 
of the home farm. The oceupatioTi to which 
he was reared he has made his life work, 
and he is now the owner of one hundred and 
eighty-one acres of valuable land, the sun lihining 
upon no finer tract in all Bureau county. He 
raises considerable grain, but the products of his 
fields are used in feeding cattle and hogs, ■>vhich 
he prepare? for the market. 

Mr. Matteson was married on the 21st of No- 
vember, 1889, to Miss ilay Perkins, who was 
born in Bureau county, Illinois, August 28, 1868. 
They now have one daughter, Gertrude B. Mr. 
Matteson belongs to the ^la-onic fraternity, and 
exercises his right of franchise in support of the 
men and measures of the republican party. Ili^ 



religious faith is indicated by his membership in 
the United Brethren church, with which his family 
are also identified. Viewed in a personal light, 
he may well be said to be a successful man, hav- 
ing gained not only a handsome competence, but 
also the reward and esteem of his fellow citizens. 
His business affairs have been carefully managed 
and his laudable ambition and strong purpose 
have been salient features in his career. He and 
his family are prominent socially and in the 
church, and they have a beautiful home v.hich is 
the abode of warm hearted and attractive hos- 
pitality. 



JOHN J. GINGRICH. 

Noting the fact that John G. Gingrich started 
out in life empty handed, his enterprise and 
success can be measured when one knows that he 
is the owner of an excellent and valuable farm of 
two hundred and forty acres in ifacon township. 
His birth occurred in Putnam county, Illinois, 
on the lOih of September, 1861, and he comes of 
German lineage. His father, Jacob Gingrich, 
was born in Hesse-Harnistadt, Germany, and was 
eighteen years of age when he bade adieu to that 
country and sailed for the new world in company 
with liis parents, who located at Tonica, La Salle 
county, Illinois. Soon afterward Jacob Gingrich 
took up his abode in Woodford county, Illinois, 
where he began business life for himself, and later 
he came to Bureau county. Subsequently, how- 
ever, he was numbered among the pioneer resi- 
dents of Livingston county, where he purchased 
one hundred and sixty acres of raw land. This 
he improved, making his home thereon until the 
time of his death, which occurred on the 5th of 
April, 1874, when he was forty-one years of age. 
He held membership in the ilennonite church, 
voted with the democracy, and for many years 
served as a school director. His wife bore the 
maiden name of Veronica Eoggey, and was liorn 
in Granville, Putnam county, Illinois, where their 
marriage was celebrated. She is now living in 
Bradford, this state, and on the 7th of September, 
1906, reached the age of sixty-eight year?. By 
her marriage she became the m.other of four chil- 
dren: Jolm J., Lena N., Mary and Peter M. 

John J. Gingrich pursued his studies in the 
public schools and was early trained to habits of 
industry and economy upon the home farm. De- 
sirous of engaging in farming on his :)\vn account, 
when twenty-two years of age he started out in 
life for himself, securing eighty acres of land in 
Macon township. Subsequently he acquired more 
land, buying first a tract of forty acres, and to 
this he has since added from time to time, until 
hi- present holdings comprise two hundred and 
forty acres of as fine land as can be found in 
Bureau countv. He lias made splendid improve- 
ments upon his farm, including tlie erection of a 
commodious and attractive residence in 1889. 



PAS'i- AX]) PKESKNT OF BUHEAU COUNTY. 



uhik' in I'Ji)-.' he built a largo barn. His lionie 
is siinounded by shade and fruit trees of liis own 
planting, and he has been an extensive breeder 
of Aberdeen Angius cattle for about fifteen years, 
but sold his fine eattle in 1905. He has also 
raised Poland China hogs and Xorman horses, 
and lia.^ always fed and shipped his own stoek. 

.Mr. Gingrich was- mairied February 4, ISSf, 
to Mi-s Katie A. Eigsti, who was born in Taze- 
well county, Illinois, August 9, ISGi, a daughter 
of Jacob and Veronica (Albrecht) Eigsti, who 
are mentioned an another page of tliis volume. 
Mr. and JMrs. Gingrich have become the parents 
of eight children : Alviu J., born December 12, 
1SS4; Jessie W., June IT, ISSG ; Orville C, who 
was born Februarv 26, ISSS, and died May 7, 
'i904: Albert J., "April 24, 1S91 ; Wilfred C, 
March C, 1894; E'sie F., Xovember 12, 1S9.5; 
Irving H., Julv 22, 1897; and I'ercv P., April 
5, 1901. 

Mr. Gingrich has been called upon to serve in 
several positions of public trust, the duties of 
which he has discharged v.'ith credit to himself 
and satisfaction to his constituents. At the pres- 
ent writing he is connnissioner of highways, and 
is serving for the third term as school trustee. 
His political support is given tlie republican 
party, and he is in thorough sympathy wirh its 
principles as regards governmental policy. He 
holds membership with the Mennonite church, 
and is one who in his relations of citizfnship and 
of private life ha.s gained the regard of his fellow- 
men by his many sterling qualities. 



SAMUEL P. PEE.SCOTT. 

Samuel 1'. Prescotl is one who has wielded a 
wide influence in community affairs and is the 
first republican in thirty-five years to be elected 
supervisor of Westfield tow-n.-liip, which position 
he is now fdliug. He has made a creditable record 
as a lawyer, being recognized as one whose knowl- 
edge of the principles of jurisprudence and de- 
votion to his clients' interests well entitles him to 
the liberal patronage accorded him in the courts. 
He was born in Eowley, Essex county, Massa- 
chusetts, October 14, 1S44, and is a representative 
of one of the old families of Xew England. The 
original ancestors in this country were of E]nglish 
birth and came to America at an early period in 
the colonization of the new world, settling in New 
Hampshire. Asa Prescott, the grandfather, and 
S. P. Prescott, the father of our subject, were 
both natives of Xew Hampshire and members of 
the family have figured prominently in the public 
life of both tliat state and of ^Massachusetts, in- 
cluding noted men in the professions, while Hon. 
B. F. Prescott, governor of New Hampsiiire, was 
a cousin of our subject. 

Samuel P. Prescott, Sr., was reared to man- 



hood in the old Granite state, whence he removed 
to Esscv county, Massachusetis, and was there 
married to ]\liss ifary M. Carleton, whose birth 
occurred in the old Bay state. For many year^ 
iMr. Prescott engaged in the numufacture of shoes 
at Haverhill and was not only a representative 
business man but also figured in public life as 
one who wielded a wide and beneficial influeme. 
He lield various positions of public trust, includ- 
ing that of aldoDnan. 

Samuel P. Preseott. Jr., spending the davs of 
hi^ boyh(.>od and youth at his pai'ents' home in 
Haverliill, was provided with excellent educa- 
tional privileges. After attending the public 
schools he continued his studies in Phillips Ex- 
eter Academy and was graduated from Dartmouth 
College in isG'i with tlie degree of Bachelor of 
Arts, while in 1ST4 his alma mater conferred 
upon him the degree of Master of Arts. Follow- 
ing the completion of his collegiate course lie 
engaged in teaching for a time and for two years 
was principal of the Francestown AeaileiuV el' 
Xew Hampshire. He regarded thi^, lin\w\er, 
merely as a forward step to other pinFes-iMicd 
labor, as it was his desire and ambition to lieeiune 
a member of the bar and to this end he began 
reading. The year 1860 witnesses his arrival" in 
Illinois and he took up his abode in Princeton, 
where the following year he was admitted to the 
bar and entered into partnership with Judge 
George W. Stipp, who afterward occupied the 
bench of the district court. For two years .Mr. 
Prescott remained a member of the Prineeton 
bar, after which he spent a similar period in 
Chicago and then took up his abode in Arlinglon, 
where he opened a law oflice. He has since re- 
mained a practitioner in Bureau county, practic- 
ing in all of the courts of this section of the state. 
He is strong in argument, logical in his deduc- 
tions and correct in his conclusions and he prc- 
pai'es his cases with masterly thoroughness and 
skill, indicating a mind well" trained in the sc- 
vere.st school of investigation. 

On the 8th of October, 1871, in Princeton, Mr. 
Preseott was united in marriage to iliss Franees 
A. Van Velzer, who was born in Joliet but ^^a^ 
reared and eilucated in the city where the mar- 
riage w-as celebrated. Her father, Granville \'au 
Velzer. was a pioneer merchant of Princeton. Mr. 
and 3Irs. Prescott became the parents of five chil- 
dren, of whom three survive: Mabel, now th'' 
wife of Isaac W. Wright of Chicago, by wliuiu 
she has two children, their names being Ellis and 
Beulah; Carl; and Warren. Two children of t!"' 
family died in early youth. 

In his political views ilr. Prescott is an earn^-t 
republican, thoroughly in sympathy with tie' 
party, its policy and its principles, and he is U"'-- 
a member of the county republican central co.n- 
mittee. He has been a delegate to various county, 
congressional and state conventions and his opin- 
ions are frequeutly a decisive factor in the cmin- 



TAST AXD PUESEXT OF BUREAU COUNTY, 



ei|. of his piirly. ;iiul yet he is not an onioe scrker 
nor lilies he de-ire the rewards of otiiee for party 
iValtv. ?Ie holds nieuihcrship in Levi Liisk lodge, 
Xo. '-^70, A. F. & A. M., of Arlington, in which 
he is now serving as master, and he also belongs 
to the chapter and comniandcry at ilendota. At 
a recent election he was chosen supervisor of West- 
field townshiji, the first republican elected to that 
(itlke in thirty-five years — a fact which indicates 
his personal popularity and the confidence reposed 
in him. While he is neglectful of no duty of 
citizenship his attention is chiefly given to his 
practice with the result that he has attained an 
enviable place among the able lawyers of the Bu- 
reau county bar with a clientage that is at once 
fxteiKive and important. 



BEX,E\:\11X F. DOW. 

Benjamin F. Dow, a faniier and -truk-r.u.-er 
living on section S, Fairfield townshiii, c.nne to 
Bureau county in 1847 and has siiif> li\'cil in 
the township which is yet his home, lie was 
born in Freedom, Cattaraugus countv, Xew 
York, May 2G, 1S31, and is a son of Whitcher 
and Eunice (Bump) Dow, who, arriving in this 
county ia 1817, took up their abode at Y'ork- 
town, where the father secured a large tract of 
land. At one time he operated over four hun- 
dred acres and was an extensive farmer and 
stock-raiser, successfully conducting his business 
interests. Both he and his wife were natives of 
Vermont, and the former was of English lineage, 
while the latter was of Scotch descent. They 
were married in Cattaraugus county, New Y''ork, 
in February, 18"28, and traveled life's journey 
together for almost a half century. They were 
separated by the death of Mrs. Dow, Xovejuber 
29, 1877. Mr. Dow survived until June, 1882, 
and passed away at the age of seventy-seven years. 
He was the first supervisor of Faiit'cid township, 
being chosen to that office in 18-19, and serving 
for several years. In connection with his general 
agricultural pursuits lie was also engaged in the 
dairy business, made cheese and raised stock. Ilis 
farm work, therefore, was of a varied nature, 
but in all departments was carefully conducted 
and resulted in the acquirement of a handsome 
competence. His was indeed a busy and useful 
life and aside from his agricultural interests he 
found time to assist in the promotion of those 
matters which affect the general welfare and ad- 
vance public progress. 

In tlie family were eight children, all of whom 
were at one time residents of this county. Emily 
bcame the wife of 0. W. McKenzie, and died at 
Y'orktown, Xovember 5, 188S, while her husband 
pas>;ed away in July, 1892. Emeline became the 
wife of John JfcKenzie, and died at Tampico, 
December 27, 1879, liaving for six years survived 



her husband, lieujamin F. is the third of the 
family. Thomas, residing in Tampico, where he 
is engaged in the stcamlitting business, married 
iliss Willet and has a family of eight children. 
Ed want W. died in Watertown, Illinois, in Octo- 
ber, 1905, at the age of sixty-seven years, leav- 
ing a family, but his wife, who bore the maiden 
name of Fannie Greenman, had passed away in 
I'JUr.. II. II., a resident of Pasadena, Califor- 
nia, was married first to a Miss Brown, a sister 
of the late L. W. Bro^vn, who for many years was 
supervisor of Fairfield township. His present 
wife bore the maiden name of Susan Gray. AI- 
biiia became the wife of J. E. Greenman and died 
in March, 1903, at Tampico, where her husband 
still resides. H. Clay, living at West Point, :\[is- 
sissippi, wliere he follows farming and well drill- 
ing, was married first to 3[rs. Pitney. 

Benjamin F. U)ow was reared to the age of six- 
teen years in Cayuga county. New Y'ork, and 
during that period attended the public schools. 
As stated, he became a resident of Bureau county 
in 1847, and in 1850 he left here to continue 
his education in Whiteside county. While work- 
ing in Whiteside county at a later date he pur- 
chased a part of his preseut farm of one hundred 
and eighty acres on section 8, Fairfield tou'n- 
ship, and he has made this his home since his 
marriage, which important event in his life was 
celebrated on the 25th of Xovember. 1856, the 
lady of his choice being Miss Sarah E. Jones, 
who was born in JfcDonough county, Illinois, 
July 2, 1838, a daughter of Perincnas and Anne 
(Dickinson) Jones. Her father died at Tennes- 
see, Illinois, in 1842, when a comparaii/ely 
young man, and Mis. Jones made her home for 
forty years in McDonough county. ^Irs. D(jw 
was the eldest of five children anl ^\^- the lir-t 
white child born in Tennessee township, !\lel 'en- 
ough county. The other members of her father's 
family were: Martin L., who died in that county 
about 1858; Nancy A., who became the wife of 
Earl Dnrat, and died in Whiteside county in 
1871 ; and tw^ins wlio died in infancy. After 
losing her first husband j\[rs. Jones became the 
wife of Patterson Aber, who went to California 
about 1850 or 1851 and died there. They had 
one child, John W., who now resides in th.e 
Indian Territory. Her third husband was L. 
Underhill and tliey resided for a tiuie in Bureau 
county, but later took up their abode in McDon- 
ough county and subsequently removed to the 
Indian Territory, whore both passed away, the 
death of Mrs. Underhill occurring in 1898, when 
she had reached the advanced age of eighty years. 
By her third marriage she had three children: 
ilargaret, who became the wife of William Love, 
and died in 1903; Charles, who was married in 
McDonoiigh county, Illinois, to Mary McKeuzie, 
and is now living in ^^fissouri; and Eli^aiieth, the 
wife of Williairi Lnne, of the Indian Territo:-y. 

^[rs. Dow was about fourteen vears of at^e 



TAST A:<D riiKSEXT OF LUliEAU COLWTY 



wlifii she bcL-ume a rcsidtiit of Wluie^idu cuuiily. 
Illinois, there living with her aunt, ^Irs. Naiiey 
Foy, until her marriage. Ey this uuiou there 
have been born four children, all born on tlie 
home farm in Fairfield township. I'leasant L., 
born in January, 1859, and now living on the 
old homestead on section 5, i\iirfield township, 
nnarried Miss Louie Seott and has six children. 
Zillah A., born October 5, 1S60, is tlie wife of 
William Shear, of Henry county, Illinois, and 
tliey have two children. Lauer J., born in 18GG, 
resides in Sacramento, California., and is an ele:;- 
trician and engineer. He married Miss Daisy D. 
Hogebooin and they have four children. One 
child of the family," tilee, borj] in IS:^, died in 
infancy. 

Politically, Mr. ])ow has always been a repub- 
lican and attended the first convention of the 
party at Princeton in 1854 when John H. Bryant 
was nominated for congress. In 1856 he voted 
for Fremont and he also attended the convention 
when he was nominated. He has served in vari- 
ous township offices and has always been found a 
trustworthy official. Tlie long years of his resi- 
dence liere and his upright life well entitle him to 
mention with the representative pioneer settlers, 
and from memory die can relate many interesting 
incidents of the early days when Bureau county 
was still a frontier district and when the work of 
improvement and progress seemed scarcely begun. 
Great changes have occurred, converting cross- 
roads villages into thriving towns and cities, 
wherein are found many commercial and indus- 
trial interests, while the broad prairies indicate 
the splendid labor that has been put forth by 
the agricultural class, reclaiming the wild land for 
the uses of civilizatiim. 



HUGH G. GUXXIXG. 

Hugh G. Gunning is the owner of two hun- 
dred acres of rich farming land in Xeponset 
township and operates altogether two hundred and 
eighty acres, in addition to which he feeds cattle 
for the market. A life of enterprise and in- 
dustry has been crowned with success, and he is 
today accounted one of the leading farmers of 
his community. 

A native of Xeponset township, he was born 
April S, 1S62, and is a son of John and r^Iargaret 
(Porter) Gunning, who were born near Belfast, 
in County Down, Ireland, the former February 
22, 1828. Their wedding journey was the voy- 
age to America, made in June, lS-19. The ves- 
sel on which they embarked was wrecked oil' the 
banks of Xewfoundland, lost three men overboard, 
was dismantled of her spars, and it was with diffi- 
"culty that she was kept afloat, but by working the 
pumps for three weeks she was saved, although 
she drifted back to tlie coast of Ireland. There 
repairs were made aii'l she sailed again, this time 



reaching the harbor of New York m safely. (Jn 
coming to America John Gunning and his yuuu" 
wife located at Troy, Xew York, and in ISJG 
arrived in Keponset. Soon afterward he pur- 
chased land and to his original tract he added 
until he had a half section. Upon this he placed 
many excellent improvements, making it one of ihe 
fine farms of the township. He voted with the 
republican party and served as road commissiuner 
and in other public offices of trust. In Ireland 
he was a member of the Presbyterian clmrch, 
while in Xeponset ho became, a member of the 
Congregational church, to which his wife also 
belonged. Her death occurred in 1880, when she 
was sixty years of age, while Mr. Gunning died 
in 1903, when about seventy-five years of ago. 

Xo event of special importance occurred to vary 
the routine of farm life for Hugh G. Gunning 
in his boyhood days and when twenty-two years 
of age he began farming on his own account. lie 
has since followed this occupation, and is now 
controlling two hundred and eighty acres of rich 
land, of which he owns two hundred acres. The 
fields return to him rich crops and he also buys, 
feeds and fattens for the market about a carload 
of cattle annually. He raises from one hundred 
to one hundred and fifty liead of hogs annually, 
and in 190G shipped three carloads of hogs. 

On the 35th of March, 1885, itr. Gunning was 
married to Miss Emma E. Pickering, whose birth 
occurred in Xeponset township. May 19, 1866, a 
daughter of George and Sarah Ann (Stabler) 
Pickering. Her father, a native of Y'orkshirc. 
England, born December 17, 1829, is now living 
in Xeponset, while her mother, whose birth oc- 
curred in Y^orkshire, March 22, 1837, died August 
28. 1895. They were married February -1, 1855, 
and soon afterward came to America, crossing the 
Atlantic on a sailing vessel which dropped anchor 
in the harbor of X"ew Y'ork. Making their way to 
Illinois, they settled in what is now X^'eponset 
tow-nship, where the father fcillowed the occupa- 
tion of farming. In 1880 he purcha.sed land in 
that towii=hip and successfully devoted his energies 
to the cultivation and improvement of the prop- 
ertv until 1900, when he purchased a honis in 
the village of X'eponset, where he has since lived 
retired. In politics he is a democrat and has 
served as a school director, but has not held nor 
desired other ofiice. Unto Mr. and .Mrs. Picker- 
ing were born sixteen children, of wdiom twelve 
are now living: Betsy, the wife of Henry Burnett : 
Jennie, the wife of William Hood: Susan, the 
wife of E. C. Carpenter; Harriet, who married 
Henrv Augustin : David: Mrs. Gunning: George 
W. : John E.: Isabel, the wife of Oliver Slates: 
Lottie Mav, the wife of George Kopp: Charles: 
and Fred." 

:\rr. and ^frs. Gunnin- have L.-eome the parents 
of nine children: Mabel .AL, wl.o was born June 
16. 1886. and is the uife of William Bennett: 
Ste'hi A., born X'ovend'fr 27, 1>^3; Laura, wlio 



PAST AND ri.'ESEXT OF lU'JJKAU COUN'IV. 



was born Jlaich 1, 1S90, and diuj in infancy; 
Hi'or^'c 11., born April 23, 1893; Koberl J\l., 
January 24, lS9o; iSciiha K., October 31, 1S97 ; 
John M., in December, 1000; Leslie It., August 9, 
I'j03; and Lottie L., December 13, 1905. 

roiitically, j\[r. Gunning is a republican. He 
has never sought or desired oHice as a reward for 
party fealty and has served only as school director, 
acting in that capacity for nine years. He is iu- 
teresfcd, however, in matters of general improve- 
ment and upbuilding and can be counted upon for 
aid in movements of progressive citizenship. 



DYEK EGBERT KIPP. 

l)_\er Egbert Kipp is a retired farmer residing 
in Mineral. In former years he was actively 
associated with agricultural interests, and thr lugh 
his close application and unfaltering energy he 
acquired the capital that now enables him to rest 
from further labor and enjoy the fruits of his 
former toil. He was born in Steuben county. 
New York, January IS, 184G, a son of Dyer 
Lathrope and Jane Evaline (Parker) Kipp. His 
education was obtained in tlie common schools 
of his native state and he came to Hlinois in 
18C2. He was at that time sixteen years of age 
and soon afterward he entered Graiid Prairie 
Seuiinary, where he remained as a student for 
two years, while for one year he attended the 
Wesleyan University at Bloomington, Illinois. 
He was thus provided with good educational privi- 
leges which well fitted him for life's practical 
and responsible duties. When twenty-two year.s 
of age ho went to ilissouri and woiked as a farm 
hand. Following his return to Illinois he resided 
for six years in La Salle county and then re- 
moved to Livingston county, where he followed 
the vocation of farming, residing there from ISTD 
until he came to Mineral in 1903. Here he has 
since lived in the enjoyment of a well earned rest, 
his competence being suflicii'Ut to supply him with 
all of the necessities and many of the comforts 
and luxuries of life. 

Mr. Kipp was married on the 31st of Januarv, 
ISTO, to Miss :\rary Emily Bassett, of La Salle, 
Illinois, and they became the parents of six chil- 
dren. Julia Inez, a graduate of GraTid Prairie 
Seminary and of the Northwestern University at 
Evanston, Illinois, was appointed a missionary to 
Aligarh, India, whither she went in 1906. Pay 
Bassett is also engaged in missionary work, hav- 
ing spent the past three years in the mission 
schools at Quionga, Africa. Cora Irene, a gradu- 
ate of the Grand Prairie Seminary, has for two 
years been a student in the Chicago College of 
Physicians and Surgeons. Karl Parker, also a 
grailuate of Grand Prairie Seminary, has for the 
past three years engaged in farming' in Henry 
county, Illinois. Orin Lansing Garfield and 
Marion D. are students in Cornell Colle::e at 



ilount Wtiiou, Iowa. On the 1st of June, 1897, 
^Irs. JIary E, Kipp pa.-sed away and Mr. Kipp 
has since married Jfiss Emma Denning, a daugh- 
ter of A'alentine IT. Denning, of La Salle county, 
and a cousin of Pev. John 0. Denning, of India, 
wluj for years was a presiding elder and who now 
for a long period has been a missionary in India. 
Another cousin, Lou B. Denning, spent many 
years as a missionary in South America. Both 
the Kipp and Denning families have been devoted 
to church work, many of their number giving 
their time and energies to labor in the missionarv 
field. 

Mr. Kipp. of this review, has filled the ofllr-e 
of ju.-tice I'f the peace, and for many years was 
school diifctor. He was a trustee and steward in 
the Methodist Episcopal church at Wing, Illi- 
noi.-;, which he helped to organize, and is now a 
steward in the ilethodist church of Mineral. His 
life has been in harmony with his professions, 
characterized by a consideration for others, by 
straightforward dealing and by strict conformity 
to nmnly principles at all times. He thus merits 
and enjoys the confidence and goodwill of his 
fellowmcn and wherever known he is held in the 
highest respect. He holds a St. John medal for 
being one of the men tluit voted for St. .John in 
l.'^SJ. and he has voted the prohibition ticket e\cv 



E. A. LA DUE. 

The commercial interests of Spring Valley find 
an active factor in E. A. La Due, wh.o is con- 
ducting a drug store and who in his business 
career keeps in touch with modern ideas of prog- 
ress and development. He was born in New York 
state, August 21, 1839. His father, Abraham 
La Due, was likewise a native of the Empire 
state, as was l-.is wife, who bore the maiden name 
of Hannah Youug. Throughout an active busi- 
ness career he devoted his time and energies to 
farming, and he died in 189S, at the very vener- 
able age of ninety years. 

In his boyhood days E. A. La Due was a public 
scliool student in Warlesport, New Y'ork, where 
he pursued the high school course, and later he 
continued his studies in Monroe Academy at El- 
bridge, New York. When sixteen years of age 
he became interested in a general store, which he 
conducted su'^cc-sfully in Montezuma, New York, 
for three years, but tliinking that the middle west 
would offer better business opportunitie--. he made 
his way to Illinois in ISGO and located in York- 
town. There he opened a general store, which 
he conducted for three years, after which he de- 
voted one year to faruting. He then again en- 
tered commercial life as a mereh.ant of Yorktown. 
Two years later he removed to Tanipico, when 
that town was organized, and there engaged in 
business as a merchant and druggist for fifteen 



5-^S 



PAS' 



AMI J'lM 



X'J' OF J;i 



C'OLXJ'V 



Vfais. Ih' luH Ld.itiniicd HI the laiicr liiio since 
"lS7:3, and hi ISyT hr e-ainr t.i Spiiii^; Valluy. 
After removing' twiro liu croi-tuil the ciimniiiilious 
and attractive store buiKlin- which he now occu- 
pies, carrying on a large and .^rowing ti-,idc. JIo 
has a full line of drugs and suiidi_\ goo.l, and a 
liberal patronage is accorded hiin. He has also 
erected two handsome residenc es in Sjning A'alloy, 
one of vhieh be occupies. 

In ISGl was celebrated tlie niarria-r of :\[r. La 
Due and Miss Cecelia M. lane, a nalne of Michi- 
gan. They have becunic the iiaiciits of two sons 
and two daughters: ]ir. V>. i.a Due. a practieinL' 
phvsician of Ottawa: 1". M.. uho condiiet-^ a fanu 
in Whiteside county, winch wa- leucha-ed h,\ hn 
father forty-four year^^ auo; l-",ninia. iio\\ the wife 
of J. C. I'inkley, of 8[rring \'alh'v; and Marv. 
the"" wife of X. H. Smith. 

Mr. La Due belonus to S. Zd. Dal^all lodge. 
No. 805, A. F. c<c A. M., of which he is a charter 
member, and he attends the Congregational 
church, being a charter mendjcr at Yorktown. 
His political allegiance has always been given to 
the republican party, but ho has never sought 
or desired oflice, preferring to concentrate his 
energies upon his business affairs, which, being 
capably conducted, have led to substantial and 
gratifying success. lie stands among those to 
whom prosperity has come as the reward of earn- 
est and diligent effort and he has won simul- 
taneous] v an honored nanic. 



LOUIS C. STADLi:];. 

Louis C. Stadler has throughout las entire busi- 
ness career been identified with the mercantile in- 
terests of HoUowayville, wliere he is now pro- 
prietor of a good general store and also has charge 
of the postollice, his father. Christian Stadler, hav- 
ing served as postmaster since 1SG9, and also for a 
term previous to that time. The latter was born 
in the city of ilunchen, Bavaria, Germany, May 
20, 1S21, and, after the death of his father, came 
to America with hisjuother, who died here at the 
age of eighty-four years. It was in 1S4G that 
Christian Stadler took up his residence in Bureau 
county, locating on a farm near HoUowayville. 
Tlie following year he became interested in the 
store of which his son is now owner, and in IS.j? 
gave it his personal supervision, being actively 
engaged in mercantile pursuits until he turned 
the store over to our suljjeet, in ISt'S. He still 
owns two good farms near HoUowayville, and, al- 
though now eighty-five years of age, he is still well 
and active. As a prominent and influential cit- 
izen of his community he has been called upon to 
serve in several local othces of honor and trust, 
having been supervisor, touu clerk, school treas- 
urer and njad I'omniissioner. 

In 1S48, in this county. Christian Siadhjr mar- 



ried Kli/ahelh Lehrer, who was aL-,o born m Mun- 
chen. r.avaiia, March !i, ls-.':i, and cai,ie to the 
new world in ISlC. r,,r over half a century they 
traveled life's joiMucy togcth.a-. but the wife"pas.scd 
away in .A|>iil. IIMi.",. Tu them were boi'n eleven 

naiiic|\ ; Louis ('., of this review; Hannah, th,- 
wife of llcv. Km.'.^t .Xal.hol/.. a mini^tci- of tla- 
Lullai-an church, now located in Lancaster. \Vh- 
con^in; Li/xie, th.' wife of Frcl Mcrkel. of Scllc,- 
towiwhilc and (•hri>tian (',.. uho married Lnmia 
Ila:-dlle. «ho resid.s on a farm near Iloil,,«a\- 
ville. in .Sclhv township. 

.\ native of P.urcaii ,ouutv, Louis C. Stadler 
ua- horn on hi. falhci's farm," near Hollowavville, 
in is:,;, and was here ivaied and educated. When 
a small hoc he entered In- fatherV store, an 1 a> 
the vcars jias-^ed he hccainc thon.udilv fauiiliar 
wilh the huMiiess HI all its departm-nl.. Since 
Lsiis he lia- conducted the store uiuler \n> owji 

na and as a t;ood and ivlialde merchant he 

has built up an excellent trade. 

Mr. Stadler was marri-d in ]ssn ,„ M,,. Marv 
Merk..'. a daughter of Jar.,h and Anna M. .M t';..!. 
Her father, who was a farmer hy occiipati.ci. i- 
now deceased, but her motlirr i< still Iimh-, and 
resides in HoUowayville. Mrs. Stadler was horn 
in Sclby township, where her parent.-, located about 
ISJii, and she is one of a familv of seven chihiieii. 
the others being Fred, Louis, "Jacob, ilrs. 'I'lllie 
Golden, Mrs. Christiana Helmer and iliss Kate 
Merkel. who resides with hei- ne.ther ill Hollouav- 
ville. Mr. and Mr.s. Stadh r have three cluldreii: 
Emma K., Christian L. and Bertha H. The son 
now assists his father in the store. 

Mr. Stadler and his family are members of St. 
John's German Lutheran church, and socially hi' 
is Cjuitc proniineut, being a memlier of the bir.e 
lodge of Masons at Arlington and the cliapti'.' at 
Princeton, the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows at HoUowayville and the Knights of Pythias 
at Seatonville. The Democratic party usually re- 
ceives his endorsement and sup[)oiL, but he is 
somewhat inde])endent in politics, and is a recog- 
nized leader in public attairs. having served as 
president of the village board for the past twelve 
years, tliough he recently resigned. Ife has also 
tilled the offices of town clerk and school trea-;urer. 
and gives his support to any enterprise which he 
believes will advance the social, moral or material 
welfare of his town or countv. 



SEIUXG P. SALMON. 

Sei ing P. Salmon^ who died at Princeton on lb.' 
Oth of February, 1903, was a well known and 
iiighly esteemed early settler of this part of the 
state and for many years was closely associated 
with its agricultural interests, while the qualitie- 
of a iioIjIc manhood as e.Kcmplified in his bu-i- 
nes- larcer, in liis public spirited citizenship and 



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PAST AND I'JiL^SKXT OF iUMIKAU COU.XTV. 



liii relations ,vi*h hid iVllowi-ifn, wuti J(ji liim tho 
.-iiiiccic and lunjualilleJ regard of all with wlioui 
iio came in contact. He was born in Jlorris 
LOtinty, Xew Jersey, January 28, 1830, liis par- 
entr being John and Caroline (Bartley) Salmon, 
rtiio came to Illinois in 1853, locating in I'rinee- 
ton. The father was engaged in farming for a 
considerable period, making his home in the out- 
skirts of the city, and there he and his wife lived 
until they were called to their final rest. 

Sering P. Salmon, roared in the state of his 
nativity and educated in the common schools, was 
married in New Jersey, April 3, 1S51, to Miss 
Augeline Salmon, of Morris county, that state, 
who still resides in Princeton at the age of seventy- 
five years. 

Coming to ■"Illinois at an early period in the 
development of Bureau county, S. P. Salmon was 
for many years engaged in farming, placing his 
land under a high state of cultivation and equip- 
ping it with all modern impi'ovements and acces- 
sories. Everything about his farm was kept in 
excellent condition and the fields brought to him 
rich harvests in return for the care and labor he 
bestowed upon them. He continued his farming 
operations until his retirement from active busi- 
ness life, when he took up his abode in Prince- 
ton, where he spent his remaining days. In his 
political views he was a stanch democrat and for 
several years capably filled the office of super- 
visor of Selby township, where he also served as 
assessor and in other local positions. Both he 
and his wife were members of the Presbyterian 
church, in the work of whicli he took an active 
and helpful part, serving as an elder for many 
years. ITe was a man of high ideals, and upright 
principles characterized his entire life, so that 
M'hen he passed away on the 9th of February, 
1903, he left behind him an untarnished record 
and a good name. 

Unto IsW. and Mrs. Sering P. Salmon were 
born two sons. The elder, J. B. Salmon, born in 
Ohio in 1853, is still a resident of Princeton. 
S. J. Salmon, born in this city in ISG t, was 
reared under the parental roof and was educated 
in the city schools of Princeton. For the past 
seven years he has been with the J. I. C. Thresh- 
ing Macliine Company as traveling salesman, and 
is an enterprising, alert business man, who now 
controls a large patronage and is popular with 
those with whom he has trade relations. He was 
first married to Mi^s Mary Belle Boggs, of Prince- 
ton, who died February 8, 1902, at the age of 
thirtv-seven years, leaving three children : i[ary 
Ethel, at home; John J., who died January 24, 
190G, at the age of sixteen years; and William 
B., at home. Mr. Salmon's present wife was 
formerly Miss Myrtle C. Everett, of Chicago. The 
family homp is at No. 5ir South Church street, 
find the members of the household occupy an 
enviable position in social circles in Bureau 
county, wliere the familv has so lone: been widelv 



orably known, the representatives of the 
earlier gLiirratiims having curne here more 
lalf centurv ago. 



DAVID E. PATTEKSON. 
Itavid E. I'aiietson, whose well improved farm 
ot three liuiidied and twenty acres is the reward 
of diligence and carefully directed business inter- 
ests, dates his ri'sidence in Bureau county from 
1S53. He was born in Chester coumv, Pennsyl- 
vania, July 22, 1S32, his parents being William 
and Kachel (Header) Patterson, who were likewise 
natives of tlie Keystone state, where thev spent 
their entire lives, both having now passed av.av. 

David E. Patterson is indebted to the public- 
school system of Pennsylvania for the educational 
privileges and opportunities wherebv he was fitted 
for the practical duties of life. Thinking to en- 
joy better business opportunities in the° middle 
west he came to Bureau county in 1853, when a 
young man of twenty-one years, and has since been 
identified with industrial and agricultural pur- 
suits in this jiart of the state. He first worked at 
the carpenter's trade in La Salle county anl then 
returned to Bureau count}-, where he has resided 
continuously since, giving his attention to farm- 
in2-._ Year by year he has labored earnestly and 
persistently and as his financial resources have in- 
creased he lias made judicious investir.ents in prop- 
erty and is today the owner of three hundre.l and 
twenty acres of finely improved fanning land. His 
fields, which are enclosed with well kept fences, 
are always highly cultivated and the latest im- 
proved machinery facilitates the work of the farm. 

On the 4th of December, 1S5G, Mr. Patterson 
was married to ^Miss :\[ary Davis, who was born 
January 20, 1S3G, her parents being Benjamin and 
Unity (Smitn) Davis, both native; of Franklin 
county, Pennsylvania. They came to Illinois in 
1S54 and after living for a time in the town of 
Peru, La Salle county, removed to Bureau county, 
where they spent their remaining days. The father 
lived to the very advanced age of eighty-seven 
}ears, while his wife was called to her final rest 
at the age of fifty-five years. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Patterson have been born nine children: Samuel 
If.. Abel E., William E., Mary E., Benjamin 
Franklin, :Melvin. E.. ITarvey W., Alice Lewis and 
Clarence David. The family circle yet remains 
unbroken by the hand of death and in his farm- 
ing operations :\rr. Patterson is assisted by his 
sons, sa\e Melvin E., who holds a government po- 
sition in Chicago. 

The subject of this review is a v.ell preserved 
man, who has traveled life's journey for seventy- 
four years and possesses vigor, activity and a spirit 
of enterprise usually found in men of much 
younger age. His life has been or.-- of activity. 
ITe early came to a reallocation of th:- fact that in 
-America labor is King and the years have v-it- 



AS'J' AXD i'i;ksi:xt 



ui' i;li;|';ai' coixty. 



upun 



ncs.srj a disiilay of cnci-.\ an. I ,lel.'i in 
his pari tJuU liavt' niado Jiiia a jirn,,[,o 
of liun'au couiiLy. In all ul liis d.aliny.s lio Iia.i 
bi'Oii relialilc, urvrr liL-in,-- kiu.un in Uikr aJvautagu 
ol' the uoccsMtirs ..r 111. frllMwincii m any iradc 
ti-aiisaction, ami Ins lilV i.- aiu'lhui ilUisuaniMi of 
the facaihat Imnnr and sunr.-s in,i\ yn liniid lu 
hand. 



1)A\'1I» K. MdK'KlS. 

David K. .Murn-. w|„. .,un- and npciatos a 
farm in i'.rrlm t.,u n.-lnp, liL- lalior. kang mani- 
I'c^l in the well improved and atlraeti\e appear- 
anee of the place, \va^ horn in Jlarrisviile, Har- 
rison eountv. Ohio, on ilic 2 ith of Augii?t, 183.3. 
hhs father, ]':d\vard :\!orri,s a native of Ohio, 
was born X'o\ ember 2-i, ISOS, and became a car- 
penter and joiiKr. lie was identified with build- 
ing operations in Ilarrisvillc for many years and 
there died December 10, 1S93. His wife bore the 
maiden name of Katharine S. JIatson, and was 
boin in Virginia, January 14, 1809. Her death 
occnrrei] in ITarrisville in ISGU. By that mar- 
riage there were born ten childixai: ]Mary E., 
who -na.s born Decendier ^s. ]s:;i, and died in 
March, 1833; Benjamin F., 1m. rn duly IS, 1833, 
and died in July, 1901; Da\id K., born August 
24, 183-5; Alice E., who was born January 6, 1838, 
and died September 8, 1841 ; Xarcisoa S., who 
was born July 28, ISIO, and died on the 27ili i>f 
November of that year; George 0., wlio was born 
November 28, IS-il, and died March 14, 1847 ; 
John W., who was born iMarch 4, 1844, and lives 
at the old homestead in Harrisville; Thomas C, 
who was born October 19, 1846, and died March 
6, 1848; Julia Ann, who was born March 14, 1849. 
and is deceased; and Sarah L., who was burn 
April 19, ]S.-)1, and died March 2-5, 18:)4. 

In the place of his nativity David K. ^Morris 
spent the days of his boyhood and youth and 
acrpiircd his education. He came to Bureau 
county, Illinois, on the 7th of April, 18.j7, and 
settled in Berlin township. He was then a young 
man of twenty-two years and as a companion 
and helpmate for life's journey he chose ]Mi?s 
Phobe A. Rackley, whom he wedded in Princeton 
on the ITth of November, 18.")7. She was born 
in Alden, New York, :March 24, 183-5, and the 
following year was brought to Bureau county. 
Her father, Nathan Eacklcv, was born in Orange 
county, Vermont, Decendier 15, 1800, and in 1S3"6 
came to Bureau county, settling in Berlin town- 
ship. He died April 2.5, lSf)5, and had ho lived 
to the loth of December following he would have 
been ninety-five years of age. His wife, who bore 
the maiden name of Susan Judd. was born in 
Orange county, Vermont, Jlarch 6, 1801, and 
passed away June 14, 1>'92. They were married 
in their native county, January 28, 1820, and 
became the parent^ of four children: Ocorge, linrn 
November 2, 1S!21 ; Loui^.i, September 15, 1825; 



Xathan !■'., Oel..ber Jo, ].S-jr; and Phebe A., 
March 24, 1835. 'J'he last nrimed was educated 
in a select school in Princeti'ii, and, as stated, 
gave her hand in nurrriage in 1S5T to ilr. ilorris. 
'J'he children of this marriage are: Nathan E., 
born August 22, 1858; George 0., September 25, 
18G0; and David E., Dccend..cr 10, 1S6G. The 
last named enlisted for service in the Spanish- 
Amrriran war in April. 1898, and left fwr the 
south (in the 2i;th of tluu monih as a member of 
CmiiiKUiv K, Sixti, le-inpmt .,! Illin,,,. Volun- 
teer.-. He ,lied Au-u-^t ■.':, t.vjv. at Uliiave, I'nrto 
IJico, from which >laee hi. r.niain. uere sent 
home for interment. 

Following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. .Morris 
began their doniosiie life up":i the farm, and 
have since lived in Bureau count}', his atteiitiou 
being given to the further improvement and de- 
velopment of his land. He n'V.v owns two hun- 
dred and thirty acres in Berlin township, and 
his wife is the owner of a valuable tract of one 
luindred and ten acres. This ! nid is now worth 
two hundred dollars jier acre. In adilition to tlie 
cultivation of his fields ^h. APrris raises horses 
and Jersey cattle. He is a business man of 
iletermination and energy, who accomplishes 
wliale\er lie undoi takes, and while looking out 
for his own welfai-e is never Lecrleclful of the 
rights of others. 

He is a member of P.ureau lodge. No. 112, 
A. F. .*;: A. M., and his i.olitical support has been 
unfalterine-lv eivoii to the repuMican partv since 
he ca.-t his" first presidential b, :iot for Jolm C. 
Fremont in ]s:.r,. In lii; nlig- us belief he is a 
Congre:;;afien,ili-t, while nji wi:\- i- a member of 
the Freewill r.apt]>t e!:i:rcli. i -r father having 
as-isted in building the college of that denom.ina- 
rior. in Hillsdale. Mie'iigan. Both have many 
fr\Mid- in the coitimunitv and are a most liighly 
esteemed couple. They have le-w traveled life's 
journey tog(?t1ier for alni"-t a h;lf century, shar- 
ing with each otiicr the joys .uul sorrows, tlie 
adversity a!\d ])rosperity wliich c .-ne to all. Wher- 
ever they have become known :hey l:ave gained 
many friends atu' are h--'ld in warm regard by 
tho-e with whom thev have been brought in cor.- 
tact. 



B. F. SEAin.. 
B. F. Scarl, whose h'mie i- on section 10. 
Sclby townslup, follows fanning and also gives 
ennsidtrahle attention to the r:;i-ing and breed- 
ing of stock. He was lorn o;; what is known 
as the Pidge in that township. August 20, 1853. 
his parents being John .?. and Amanda (^filler) 
Scarl, who came to Bvireau county in the '40s. 
and were married lieie. Both wcie natives of 
Ohio. Our subject's paternal grandparents, ^fr. 
and Mrs. Brov.n Searl, a!-o cnnv:- to this county 
and settled on the farm in Solby town.-iiip now 



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4/r:l::^ii^vt^ 



PAST AM) rjJH.SKXT OF JllKKAl 



ouihmI by E. G. Searl, whore both died. Th-y 
«i;rc 111 id to rest in the IJidgo cemetery, as Aveio 
the parents of our subject. 

For llircG years the fatlier, John S. Searl, re- 
sided on the Ridge, and the following four years 
he spent on the Jacobs farm on the townsliip 
line. At the end of that time he removed to 
section 11, Selby township, where the greater part 
of liis life was pa.sscd, though he spent the last 
eleven years on his father's farm on the Eidge. 
In business alTairs he prospered and became a 
largo land owner, having altogether twenty eiglity- 
acrc tracts, mostly in vSelby township, and three 
hundred and twenty acres in Guthrie county, 
Iowa. lie gave to each of his ten children one 
hundred and sixty acres and all of the land which 
he owned 'is still in possession of the family. 
His son, B. F. Searl, owns four eighty-acre tracts 
of land, including the home place on section 11. 
John S. Searl was deeply interested in the improve- 
nu'nt and upbuilding of the county, and his fel- 
low-townsmen, recognizing his worth and ability 
and his devotion to the public good, several times 
called him to office. lie served for a number of 
terms as supervisor, also as assessor, road com- 
missioner and in other ofTices, discharging his 
duties with promptness and fidelity. Unto hini 
and his wife were born ten chihlren: B. F., of this 
review; :\rrs. Marv :\I. l?awson, now of HoldcTi. 
.Ariss.)iiri; A. J. and M. F., who are residents of 
Pi-inccli'ii; Mrs. Samantha Gross, of Princeton; 
E. G., of Sclby township; ilrs. JMaria Hassler, of 
the same township; -W. W., of Iowa, who died 
ilarcli 7, 1905; Sarah Ann, who died on the old 
iioniestead farm, October 11, 1875; and Samuel, 
whose death resulted from an accident in Iowa. 

Eearcd under the parental roof, no event of 
special importance occurred to vary the routiin' 
of farm life for P>. F. Searl in his boyhood and 
youth. lie was educated in the public schools 
of Selby township and has always followed farm- 
ing. He has also handled horses and cattle in 
large numbers, making a specialty, however, of 
fine horses, and during the past few years he 
has raised a number of fast horses. For three 
years he made his home on another farm in Selby 
town.ihip and since his marriage has re-ided on 
his present home farm on section 10, Sclby town- 
ship, where he has three hundrcil and twenty 
acres of rich and productive land, ail in one 
body. This is well cultivated and highly im- 
proved and is altogether a model farming prop- 
erty, equipped with the accessories which facilitate 
farm work and render the work of the fields less 
laborious. 

ilr. Searl was married to Miss Marv A. Long, 
also a native of Selby township, where lier girl- 
hood days were passed. She is a daughter of 
Francis M. and Caroline (Piper) Long, v.ho came 
to this county in lS-12 and were farming people. 
Her mother died December 16, ISGl, during tlic 
early girlhood of the daughter, and in 1S>;S the 



father rfiiio\eiJ fioiu llurciu county t.) Iowa, 
where hi- died about .-c\en vears ago. Ti-.e mar- 
riage of .Mr. and Mr-. Searl'lias been blessed with 
nine children: Julin ."<., of Iowa, who is engaged 
in farming, drilling wells and operating a 
thresher and also deals in agricultural imple- 
ments; Pert, Xancy, Andrew and Cole, all at 
honif; Ada and Sadie, twins, at homo; aiu] Caro- 
line an, I Penjainin F.. who are a^o under the 
pnrrntal nn.f. 

IV.lithidly, .Mr. Searl is a repitbliean ;.nd has 
been ele. trd to several local offices. He In- served 
as road tnmmi,— ioner and as assessor for several 
terms, ami ha- also acted as judge of elections, 
lie is quite prominent socially, belonging to the 
ila.-onic lodge at Arlington, the KniVnts of 
Pythias lodge at Maiden and the Odd Fellows 
lodge at HoUowayville. He is carefidly cud suc- 
cessfully conducting liis business iutercits and 
stands as a representative of that progress in 
agricultural life which has largely revolutionized 
farming in the last quarter of a century. The 
2mme of Searl has long l>een a prominent and 
honored one in connection with the tilliitg of soil 
and the raising of stock in this county, and B. F. 
Siarl has added luster to the family record by 
liis own business .activity and commercial in- 
tcu'ritv. 



LOUIS A. WITALEY. 

Louis A. Wlialey, whose farm of one r 
and lll'ty acres i- pleasantly located in Obi 
ship, was born in Allen county, Indiana, •"' 
1850, his parent^ being Lsaac and Eliza J. 
ston) ^Vhaley, vhosc family numbered thr 
dren, of whom Lotiis A. was the second, 
the only one now living. The father v>-: 
in Ohio, ''hence he removed to India: 
afterward to Illinois, settling in ^Marion 
He died during the early boyhood of ' 
Louis, and his widow, who was also a lu 
the Buckeye state, is now Mrs. James Si: 
resident of Patoka, ;Marion county. Her r 
was formerly from Oneida. Illinois, but 
living in Patoka. and of this marriage - 
dren have been liorn. 

Louis A. Whaley largely acquired his e^.": 
in the schools of Patoka, "and throughou: 
followed farming operations. He is a s;-' 
man, having started out on his own accouri 
handed. He realized the value of hones 
enterprise, however, and has graduall}- 
his way upward, overcoming all obstaeh:- 
path by determination and energy. lie i 
the owner of one humlred and fifty ac' 
stituting an excellent farm in Ohio towns 
which he raises grain and stock, his anir: 
of each bringing to him a good financia" 

^fr. Whaley C()riip''-'ieil his arrangeu;:: 
ha\i->_' a bonii- of lij-j own bv his marria,'^ 



undred 
:. town- 
ui\" 2S, 

( .tohn- 
.e chil- 

and is 
;S born 
la and 
county, 
.is son 
.five of 
iicox, a 
usband 
is now 
;x chil- 



ucation 
his life 
'i-inade 
: empty 
;y and 
v.orked 

in his 
^ today 
=, con- 
hip, on 
il sales 
return. 
:-.ts for 

on the 



PAST AND l>iJESJ-NT OF iiUJM'AU L'UL-.\TY. 



1st of ,Maieli, 18S3, tu Miss Laviiiu Jolm.-l.m. 
who was born in Allun county, Indiana, .Maith 
20, 185G. 'J'Ik'V havu bccoini; t'ho parents of [oui- 
cliildreu, wlw arc vut living: Guv, born Maruh 
25, ISSi; Oscar E., :Marcii 30, ISS; ; \l>v 11.. 
Septcniljcr 30, 18S8; and Beulali II., Ap'iil :;, 
1893. They have lost one son, Oscar Iv, wlm 
died .May 28, ISST. 

The family arc plia.-autly located upon tlic 
home farm, which is one of the attracti\e fea- 
tures of the landscape. Tliere are splendid build- 
ings, commodious and substantial, and the house 
is surrounded by tine shade trees, while upon the 
broad acres that coustitute the fai'in there may 
be raised the various crops which are usually pm- 
duced in the temperate zone, for the soil is ricli 
,and productive. In all of his farm work Mr. 
Whaley is practical and if others wouhl f..ll,,u 
the same entcrpri.-ing methods similar ,-ucce.-s 
might be attained. 

Exercising his right of franchi,-e in supp(ut 
of the men and measures of the republican part}. 
jMr. Whaley keeps well informed on the ques- 
tions of the day, but has never been a seeker fur 
public office. His wife belongs to the Baptist 
church and he contributes to its suppoi't. A'icw.mI 
ill a personal light his life may be said to be a 
success, and he has made a creditable name in 
business circles and gained a handsonic property 
as the reward of well directed and earnest labor. 
He has served as clerk of the district -^ehool, and 
community interest- find in him a stanch ailvo- 
cate, if he deems air, moxeim'iit or measure will 
advance the welfare of the general public. 



Princeton Inun.bi 
viemiiv of his 1,., 



In the 

-m1|.„,| 



GUY A. BIIYA.NT. 

The phrase -a treeless tract"" has ever been 
synonymous with a bari'cn waste of arid land, 
while tlie tree has ever stood as a symbol of culti- 
vation, marking the advent of the white settlers 
and their efforts for development and civilization. 
It has been said that none have done more for 
Bureau county in this direction than the Bryant 
family. Arthur Bryant, grandfather of our sub- 
ject, liejng the first to set out uj>on the broad 
prairies of Bureau count}- the trees which ha\e 
transformed it into one of the most attractive 
districts of this great commonwealth, and in this 
connection through his business interests Guy A. 
Bryant continues to do much for the county, at 
the same time promoting his individual commer- 
cial interests. He is a member of the firm of Ar- 
thur Bryant & Son of Princeton, proprietors of 
the best nursery in this portion of the state. The 
business was established in 184;") by the grand- 
father of Guy A. Bryant and is now the onlv en- 
terprise of this character in Bureau county. 

Arthur Bryant, the senior member of thi> firm 
and the father of Guv A. F.rvant. was born Octo- 
ber in, 1834, on the old F.rvant hnm-tead in 



■-"u< nf the i;r\ant lamilv shmdd b...i,me u,te,- 
e.-ted ,n the m-oume uf tree-^. The eldest s^.ii \r- 
thur r.rwiiil, 1- nnu the l,ead ,<{ the nurserv lir,„ 
of .Vrthur I'.ryaul .V S,.ii. and is widely recognize,! 
as a prominent nurseiy man and horticuUurist. 
knn\\ n llu-ou-bnul the >i,\te 111 this connectinii and 
honored a-^ one of the ablest representative- m' 
the buMnes, to which he has given his entile al- 
t(aitiei,. lie has lilled liie ollices of president and 
viee-prcineiit of the .(ate and district horticul- 
tural sncietie,- and wa- lor main vears treasurer 
of the >t,ite -oeiclv. wli.le diiiiii- the Cohinibiaii 
KvpnHtioii he ua- uii,. of the cmmiitee in charge 
of the lllim.i^ fruit exhibit. In the vear Isill 
111' was unit.Ml in iiiarriaL;e to :\Iis- Kli.-abeth 
Ilu.uhes. a nati\e ,d' X'lrmiiia. who was reared in 
Ohio and wa- bn,.i-bt to I'.uieau couiitv, Illiuoi. 
in IS.-,,-, bv her father, George Hughes. Unto 
this mariia.^e ^^vn■ born eight children: Lucv I'.., 
Ilarrv G., Guv A.. Henrietta. Cassandra H.. ],,-- 
ter ]•.. Kalph C, and Edith W. The parent.- are 
both ^^elI known in Princeton, where Ibev arc held 
in till' highest esteem in recognition of their 
many sterling traits of character. 

Guy A. Bryant was born at the familv home, 
December 12, 18GS, and iiur..ued his education in 
the schools of Princeton, eompleliny the high 
scliool course by graduation in the class of ISSii. 
From his youth he was associated with his father 
in business, becoming his active assistant, and in 
the year 1S90 was admitted to a partnership. 'J'ius 
is now the only nursery business in Bun'au count \ 
and one of the most important enterprises of tbi.- 
character in northern Illinois. The nurseries of 
tlie firm are plea.santly situated about a quarter of 
a mile south of the city limits of Princeton and 
in point of establishment the busines.- is undoubt- 
edly one of the oldest in the west or northwest, 
while the voluaie of trade also gives it precedence 
in that direction. They are growers of a great 
variety of fruit, shade and ornamental trees, shrub- 
bery, small fruits and hardy flowering plants, but 
make a specialty of evergreens, in which they 
probably have the largest and finest as.sortmeut 
and conduct the most e.\tensi\e trade of am nur- 
sery in the state. 

in 189] Guv A. Rrvant was united in marri:i-- 
to :\ri.-s l.ouisa Mile., wlin wa- born in Princeton. 
Her father, William }dile-, ua- born near Bath. 
Steuben county, Xeu Y.uk, July 2G, 1822. His 
grandfather, Isaac ililes, was "a soldier of the 
Revolutionary war, having served for two yi^irs 
as a member of a regiment from Connecticut, oi" 
which state he was a native. AVilliani ^Milcs ac- 
ipiired his education in the connnon schools, and 
afterwanl became acijuainted with the lumber 
tra<le and e\entuallv became an expert in bis 
kTi(,ul,'dge of lumber. He was married :\ra\ 19- 



I'A? 



AXD PRESENT OJ'' BUIIEAU COUXTY. 



I, to Jlisri Nnncy A. I'arker, also a native of 
;|',rri county, Xew York, where she was reared 

lanhood". In the family of Mr. ami Mrs. 

, were se\en children: Jlarrict M., Liiciu.'; 
i;r.ir-e. William, Edward, Louisa and James, 
ouiiit his nu^rriage Mr. j\Iiles embarked in 
luiiiher business and throughout his entire life 
cmuiected with that trade. lie owned eonsid- 
,1,. land in Iowa and Illinois and was very 
•essl'id in all liis undertakings. His political 
-ianc-e was given to the republican party, of 
iso principles he was a strict adhci'cnt. lie 
I February 22, 1S9G, and his wife survived 

until January J, 1899. 
'ntii ilr. and Mrs. Bryant have been born five 
dreu : Arthur Guy, who died in infancy ; Miles 
liani, born February 10, 1891=; Louis Ealpli, 
1 November 2G, 1895; Elizabeth Parker, born 
viiiber 13, 1898; and Piobert Beach, born 
■lb 4. 1900. The parents are inembcrs of tlie 
-byteriaii church. Mr. Bryant belongs to the 
;onic fraternity, in which he has taken the de- 
■s of chapter and commandery. His political 
i,'iance is given to the republican party and he 
served for six years, from 1900, as a memijer 
lie city council from the first ward. He is a 
iig man of business acumen and enterprise, a 
thy representative of a family long distin- 
:hed in Bureau cormty for loyalty in citizen- 
1. activity and ])rogressivcness in business and 
li.ilitv in all life's'' relations. 



HKNPY THACKABEPin". 

Henry Thackaberry dates his residence in tbi = 
inuidy from 1852. Therefore events which t" 
many others are matters of history are to hiu! 
laatteis of personal experience or observation. 
He has watched many changes and noted with 
interest the progress that has occurred during 
till' lung years of his connection with the county, 
lb' lias now advanced far on life's journey, but 
ajijieais to be a man of mnch younger age and 
lu s[)irit and interests seems yet in his prime. 

He was born in the city of Queens, Ireland, on 
t!ie 18th of August, 1824, and is a son of William 
■uid Elizabeth (Christian) Tliackaberry. The 
father's birth occurred in 1784 and the mother 
was born in ISOO. They were reared and mar- 
ried on the Emerald isle, and about 1834, when 
tb-'ir son Henry was a youth of ten years, th.cy 
•'•iinived from Ireland to England. It was largely 
in tlu! latter country that Flenry Tliackaberry 
'''■'I'lired his education, and he remained a resident 
'^f England until the latter part of the year 1851. 
^^hen lie determined to seek a home in the new 
World, and made arrangements for leaving the 
'■ni.-riie i.sle." 

He sailed on the otli of November and landed 
at New York on Christmas day of that year. Pie 
first went to Chesterville, Peniisvlvania, where he 



lived with his brother, who had previously come 
to this counti-y, until the 5th of April, 1852. He 
then left the Keystone state and on the 5th of 
]May following arrived in Princeton. He has since 
been a resident of this county, and for three 
years made his home upon a farm north of Prince- 
ton. Subsequently he took up his abode in Fair- 
field township, and for twenty-one years has re- 
sided in New Bedford. He was for a long period 
our of till' aeli\i\ energetic and capable farmers 
of tlie county, carefully operating his land and 
deriving therel'inin a good income as the reward 
for the labor which he bestowed upon the fields. 
While now living retired, he is still the owner of 
two hundred and forty acres of good land on sec- 
tions 29 and 31, Fairfield township, worth from 
one hundred to one hundred and twenty-five dol- 
lars per acre. 

Mr. Tliackaberry wa- nuuried in Augu-1. 1851. 
in St. Gei.rge'- Episcopal cliurcli, Hanover 
Sqnai'e, London, to ;\li>s Jane ^learns, of ^Moiit- 
roso, Scotlaml, and it was only a few months 
later that he stalled \\ith his bride for the new 
world. L^nto them have been born three children, 
of whom one is now deceased. The others are: 
Elizalictb, who was born May 9, 1855, and is 
now the wife of A\'. K. liooth, a merchant of New 
Bedford, Illinois; and Alexander, whose birth 
occurred November IS, 1857, who is a traveling 
salesman living in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. 

}ilr. Tliackaberry is a member of the Episcopal 
church, and of Yorktown lodge, No. 655, A. F. 
& A. M., exemplifying in his life the beneficent 
spirit of the craft. His political allegiance is 
o-i\-en to the democracy, which ])arty he has con- 
tinuously supported since casting his first presi- 
di-ntial ballot after becoming a naturalized Ameri- 
can citizen. Althougli he Inheriteu a little prop- 
erty he is largely a self-made man, his success 
resulting mostly from his own labor and careful 
management. A laudable ambition led him to 
seek iiis liome in America and he has not been 
disappointed in the hope that caused him to cross 
the Atlantic, for here he has found good oppor- 
tunities and has steadily worked his way upward, 
until now in the evening of life he can enjoy a 
well earned rest, his former toil having brought 
to him a competence sufficient to surround him 
now with many of life's comforts. 



C. W. ABBOTT. 

Clement W. Abbott, a retired farmer living in 
Sbenield, but still owning good farm property in 
Bureau county, was born in Ogilen, Monroe county. 
New York. December 13. 1825. his parents being 
Calvin and Charlotte (Clement) Al)bott. Ijoth na- 
natives of Vermont. .\t the usual age Glciu.ent \V. 
Abbott began his education in the country school 
at Ogdcn, New York, but hi.s advantages were 



540 



PAST AND r 



;i:\T or ];n;i:Ar corNTV 



laryL'ly limited to instruction iu the •"'i'lircc Ji's." 
At'ter'leaving school lie worked at the carpenter's 
trade for ten years in the cast and in Se[itcniher, 
1S51, came to the middle west, settling in Henry, 
Illinois, wliere lie spent the winter working in a 
wagon shop. In the spring of 1S55 he removed to 
Mineral town-hip, Bureau county, and took up his 
abode upon a farm, continuing actively in agricul- 
tural life for forty years or until 1S!14. when he 
removed to Sheffield, wdiere lie now i' -ides. In 
1851 he purchased his farm, licei'imii'^ oNwur at 
that time of one-half section, to wliich he after- 
wards added one hundred and fifty-five acres 
about twenty years later. He made stock-raising 
and feeding the principal features of his business 
and became well known as an enterprising and 
successful stockman, readily and correctly esti- 
nrating the value of stock so that he was enabled 
to make judicious purchases and profitable sales. 
Thus he prospered year by year and rose from a 
humble financial position to one of affluence, so 
that now, with a handsome comucteiice, he is 
enabled to live retired in the enjoyment of the 
fruits of his former toil. 

On the Cth of Mav. 1S57, Mr. Abbott was mar- 
ried to :Miss Martha M. Battey, at Sheffield, who 
is re]ireseutcd elsewhere in this work, a daughter 
of Major Silas Battey, and their children are: 
Fred W., who was born May 33, 1859, and died 
January 26, 1SS6; Calvin B., who was born Aug- 
ust 1, 1SC3, and died April 28, 1SS2; Herman E., 
born 'Slay 10, 1805; and Hattie C, who was born 
December 19, 1S70, and died February 5, 1888. 

Mr. Abbott is a member of the Unitarian church 
at Sheffield and was first identified with the whig 
party, later becoming one of the founders of the 
republican party. He was asse.ssor for the town 
of Mineral for five years and was elected and served 
on the county board of supervisors for si.x years, 
his caiiability and fidelity indicating his keen in- 
terest in the welfare and progress of the county 
as conserved by its public officials, wjiile in other 
ways he has given his support to tho.se matters 
which constitute civic virtue and civic pride. He 
is a self-made man and still lakes an active inter- 
est in busincf.s afi'airs. 



ROLT.A t.p:h IH'SSFLL. 

It is a usual thing to speak of a man who in 
mercantile and the indu.^trial circles has worked 
his way upward from obscurity to prominence as 
a self-made man. but the term is equally applic- 
able in the professions, where adjancemeut de- 
pends even more entirely upon indivi'lual effort, 
owing to the fact that not through gift or inheri- 
tance can one secure the qualities wliich are re- 
quisite to success in any professional line. Mr. 
Russell has indeed been the architect of his own 
fortunes and has builded widely and well. Today 
he bears an excellent reputation as a strong and 



ahle hiu\cr, with comprchensise knowledge of tlr 
principles of jurisprudence, in the application of 



ich to (lurstions 



m he is seldom at 



Born in Sliclbv county, Illiiidis, November 21, 
ISGi, upon a farm, he is a sou of Daniel Eckert 
I'us-ell. a native of Loudoun county, Virginia, 
and of Isal.elle (Allherl) Bussell, of Bucking- 
ham county, Virginia. The father was only a 
year old when taken by his parents to Ohio and 
ui 1859 he went to Shelby count}-, Illinois, where 
he engaged in farming and stock-raising. During 
the later year- of his life he was an invalid and 
tin 11 iTiiivd liom active business cares, passing 
away in isss at the age of fifty-five years. His 
sons were thus left to face the world alone with 
the possibilities of success or failure before them 
as they should recognize and improve or neglect 
opportunities. 

Holla L. Russell acquired some education in the 
country schools and then, ambitious for more ad- 
vanced" education, worked his way through the 
high school by actiug as assistant janitor. Wlien 
he" had completed his course there he became im- 
bued, as do so man\- young men, with the desire 
to seek a fortune in the west, and with one or 
two companions made his way to Colorado and 
afterward to Texas. His experience in those 
states was one of hard struggle and is of interest 
as showing what determination and indefatigable 
energy will accomplish, lb arrived in Texas 
with" "only a few cents in hi- p^.ckef but almost 
immediately found work with a farmer, in whose 
emphiv he remaiiird for two years and who at 
the end of that time leaded to 'Sir. Russell a farm, 
wbirli lie plaiit'Ml to cotton. Unfortunately, how- 
ewr ilic ■'ittnii . rn|p ua- a failure that year owing 
in \hr e.\r,--i\r ,lrwu-bt and :\Ir. R"u.-sel] v\a9 
again lift wiilinut .ai'.ital. He started to work 
omr miiie at farm labor fni- seventeen dollars per 
iiKiiith. brim: iraiir-ferreil i,< the dairy department 
at tb.e end of twn montli-. and so satisfactory was 
his service that his wa-.s were rai-cd to twcrty 
dollars, afieiuard to thiitv (b.'lars. and later to 
thirt\-fi\e dollars per mmiih. That he was most 
faithful ai.d capable and that his service was ap- 
preclaied is indicated hy the fact that after a 
vear and a half, when .settling up v/ith his cm- 
plover, he wa- paiil for the entire term at the 
rateof tliiity-fi\e dellars per month. Duringall o.f 
this time, as a dutiful son. Mr. Russell was as- 
sisting his mother and the family, who had been 
left in straiubt(Mied circumstances through the 
lonrr illness and death of the father. 

Returning to Illinois, ;Mr. Russell engaged in 
teacliin:: school in Lee county and took uji the 
studv of law in the College "of Law in Dixon. 
He was admitted to the bar by cxamir.ation on 
the ITth of 'Mav. 1892. and the same year accepted 
the position of principal of the schools of Ohio. 
Illinois, where he remained for two years. He 
then entered upon the active practice of his pro- 




If. L. KUSSKL 



I'AS'l 



A\J 



;i';-\T OF I'.L'iJKAr (.orx'j'v. 



oi:i 



lf~.-iiiii ill coiiiR-ctinii with J-:. Ij. Ovunuan in 
Ih'iulersnn couutv. uikI.t the lirm .^tvlu uf Ovlt- 
inan & JIii^^soll. " hi .Maivh,, lH'j:,, he retunied 
t(. Ohio, Illinois, an-1 took charge of the Ohio 
Herald, which he })uhli?licd for two years, lie 
tlieu sold out and came to Princeton, where he 
has since continued in the practice of hiw. His 
reputation has been won through earnest, lioncst 
lahor and his creditable standing at the bar is a 
merited tribute to his ability. "J'lie predominant 
characteristic of his life is strength and the aim 
of his eloquence is to convince. He has won many 
notable cases while a practitioner in Bureau coun- 
ty and now has a largo and distinctively repre- 
sentative clientage. 

Mr. KussoU was married Xovember 31, ISD-J, to 
^liss nclen'"iIcLean, a native of Xcw Jersey, and 
they have three sous, William McLean, Eobcrt 
Lee and PauL Mr. Russell is a member of the 
board of trustees of the Methodist Protestant 
church and is interested in the moral and iu- 
tclleclual progress of his city to tlie extent of 
giving active and hearty co-operation to main- 
movements for advancement along those lines. 
He belongs to Princeton lodge, A. F. & A. il.. 
and in au active career he has achieved both 
character and success, advancing as he has done 
from a humble position in the business world 
to a place of cnnsiderable promineuo:^ in the legal 
profession. 



^^[ARTIX ZEAKIXG. 

Manin Zrai-iuL'. ca^liiev of the Farmers & 
^[iners Bank at l.a.ld, the success and growth of 
the institution being attributable in im -mall de- 
gree to his efforts/was born in Wr^Klrld tnwn- 
ship. Bureau county, April yo. ISiK;. aid is a 
representative of one of the distinguishcil families 
of this part of the state. His father, the Hon. 
Louis Zearing, was a native of Cumberland county, 
Pennsylvania, and came to Bureau county in 1S35, 
when this was a frontier district in which the u'Oi'k 
of civilization and imj;)rovemcnt liad been scarcely 
begun. The homes of the settlers were widely 
scattered and much of the land was still unculti- 
vated. He secured a farm wliich he develo)~,ed into 
a highly improved property and as the years 
passed by he prospered iu his undertakings and 
became one of the leading and prosperous agricul- 
turists of the community. He also took a pronu- 
nent and influential part in public all'airs aud 
filled many local oflices of trust, while for a num- 
ber of years he represented his district in the 
state senate and left the impress of his individu- 
ality upon many legislative enactments which he 
fostered. His wife bore the maiden name of .Ten a 
Cochran and was a native of Scotland. 

ilartin Zearing supplemented his prclimiaary 
education. ac(|uired in the public schools, by a 
course in a bu-iness college and througli the iieriod 



oMus b,.yl,.H„l and u_nith remaiucd upon his fath- 
er .s tariii, ii'iiili'iiiig active assistance in its culti- 
vation wh.m n...t busied with his te.xt-books. He 
left home iu Js:io, when about twenty-four years 
of age, and accepted the position of bookkeeper in 
the Farmers & Miners Bank. Later he was made 
assistant cashier and has occupied his pre.-eut posi- 
tion since 1894. The bank was established in 1890 
and has been a very prosperous instituti.ui from 
the beginning. Its success is largely due to the 
efforts of Mr. Zearing, who is a very" efficient and 
popular cashier, and during his connection with 
the institution the deposits have increased from 
thirteen thousand to two hundred and twenty 
thousand dollars. He is thorou-hly conversant 
with the banking business and is an attentive, 
obliging official, of good business rjualificatbrns. 

On the 11th of September, lS9o, iEr. Zearing 
was united in marriage to Jfiss Alva Harvev, a 
daughter of Leroy Harvey, of Galesburg, lllim.is, 
aud they have three daughters: Dorothy A., born 
August -JO, 189G; Helen i[., June 30, ISMS; and 
Jean, June S, 1901. The parents are mendjcrs of 
the Presbyterian church and Mr. Zearing is a 
-Afa-on. belnnging to Levi Lusk lodge, Xo. 270, 
A. F. \- A. if., and Peru chapter, Xo. fin. P. A. 
M.. of I'.ru. Ilis political views accord with the 
principles of the republican party and while not a 
politician iu the sense of office "s-eking he is in- 
terested in the success of his party and keeps well 
informed on the questions upon" which the two 
great political organizations diffei-. In this coun- 
try, where position in the busiiie-, political and 
social world, largely depen.l upon the in.lividual, 
aside from environment or influence. 'S\i: Zearing 
has gained a creditable piscc in his home com- 
munity as a representative of finan.-ial ci:v!es. and 
as one who in his relations with ]\U iVllo'.\ men has 
gained warm personal regard. 



JOHX E. ElLF]r. 

John K. Eilcy, who has recently sent in his 
resignation as jiostmaster of Mineral, where he is 
also conducting a restaurant and confectionery 
store, was born in ilineral township and is a rep-' 
resentative of one of the old and prominent pio- 
neer families of this part of the state. He is a 
son of William Eiley, who came with his parents 
to Bureau county at an early ep'ch in tlie devel- 
,opmcnt of this part of the state. Extende.l men- 
tion is made of him on another page of this work 
in connection with the sketch of Wilson Riley, a 
brother of our subject. 

John E. Riley acquired his ehuati'.n in the 
schools of ilineral am] spent hi? youii_er years 
upon the home farm, where he was trained to 
habits of industry, economy and diligence. After 
attaining his majority he spent s^'ven years as a 
farmer at Aurora, Xebraska, but sui'Sequcntlv 
turned his attention to conimerrial pur-uit.s, in 



511 



PAS'J' AXD I'1;KS1:XT of BUliKAU COUXTY, 



whuh he lias since been euga-e,!. For several 
years, I'miii ISSi* until FSiiG, lie conducted a f^en- 
eral iiiereantilo store in ilinoral and on selling 
out tliat business became proprietor of a restaur- 
ant, whieli he still conducts, also carrying a line of 
confectionery. lie has a well appointed, neat and 
tasteful store and restaurant and is receiving a 
liberal share of the public patronage. He has 
also acted as postmaster at Jliueral, having lieen 
appointed January 28, 1901, by President Roose- 
velt, lit" lives upon the old homestead farm and 
owns one hundred and thirty acres of land which 
is rich and arable and which yields bounteous har- 
vests as a icward for the care and labor bestowed 
upon tlie fields. 

Mr. liiley hi:s always been a stalwart repub- 
lican in his political views and is recognized as 
one of the active and influential workers in the 
local ranks of the party, doing all in his power to 
promote its growth and insure its success. He 
has many times been appointed a delegate to tlie 
county and congressional conventions and his 
opinions carry weight in party councils. He has 
been honored with some local offices, serving as 
commissioner for nine years and as school director 
for fifteen years, and he was formerly a uiomber 
of the town board. 

In December, ISTS, :Mr. Piiley was united in 
marriage to iliss ilinnie Morton, a daughter of 
J. Moj-ton, of Princeton. She died four years 
later, in 1SS2, leaving two children, Arthur W. 
and Bertha B. The former is now engaged in 
business with his father in Mineral. On the 30th 
of October, 1SS3, :\Ir. Eiley was again married, 
his second union being with ;Mis3 Mary Harrison, 
a daughter of James Harrison, a farmer living at 
Neponset. They have three children : Glen' E.. 
with father on the farm; Ada M., the wife of 
Frank Humphrey, a farmer of Mineral to\vnslnp; 
and Lottie E., at home. 

iilr. Eiley is a member of the 3Iodein Wood- 
men of America, but has ne\er figured very promi- 
nently in fraternal circles, his^ attention being 
given more largely to his business affairs and the 
political interests of the county. He is one of the 
representative men of :Mineral and in all that he 
does, whether of a public or private nature, has 
manifested a spirit of commendable enter|n-ise. 



AUTHUP BKYAXT. 

Arthur Bryant, senior member of the firm of 
Arthur Bryant l^ Sons, nurserymen, has for vears 
been treasurer of the State" Horticulturar So- 
ciety, which position is indicative of the foremost 
place which he occupies in horticultural circles in 
Illinois. He was born October 1-"), 183 1, in Prince- 
ton township, and the years of his residence in 
Bureau county arc thi'ivfore mauv. antedating 
that of most of its wdl kn.nv n and pinmini'iit men. 
His father was Arthur Br\ani, Sr.. a native of 



Cumminglnn. :ilassacliiiM tt-, burn Xovemlur s 
1803, and a son of Dr. I'elrr and Sarah (.Sn.ll)' 
Brj-aiit, wliose second .-nu was ilir crlfbnucl p,>,i 
William Cullen Bryant. Arthur Bryant, Sr., «.ii 
reared in Harnjishire county, Massachusetts, ai- 
quiring his early education in tlie common schools 
of tlie localitv, while later h(> became a stud.-nt 
in Williams (•ollrge. He was admiitcd as a cadei 
to the West Point Military Academy, but at the 
end of a year was obliged to discontinue his 
studies on account of an attack of inflammalorv 
rheuniatisni. For a time he engaged in teaehinl; 
at Pound Hill, near Boston, and was later witli 
his brother, William Cullen Bryant, in New York. 
His health being such that he was obliged to gi\e 
up ail hoiK- of a military or medical career, lie 
turned his atteuiimi t^ the west, hoping tlutl the 
new and rapidly developing country would ofl'cr 
him good opportunities. He therefore made ]li^ 
way to Illinois, arriving in Jacksonville in l83i). 
Two years later he returned to ilassachusetls, 
where he married Miss Henrietta P. Plumnier, a 
native of Berkshire county, Massacliusetts, and a 
daugliter of Edward Pluinmer. With his brid.' 
he again made his way to Jacksonville the same 
year, hut in 1833 removed to Bureau county and 
secured a claim on section 29, Princeton town- 
ship, being the first settler within the borders of 
that township. There he made a permanent home 
and in true pioneer style began life in a little log 
cabin. He at once undertook the task of clearing 
the land, which was partially covered with tim- 
ber, and soon transformed it into a highly cul- 
tivated tract. He was one of the first in tliis 
section to engage in the nursery business. He 
it was who, assisted by his younger brother, 
planted sugar maples along the roadside in his 
native town— the first trees that adorned tlie 
streets of Cummington, Massachusetts. Prince- 
ton's beauty, which is largely the result of its fine 
old trees, comes from the efforts of Arthur Bry- 
ant, Sr. It is said tliat example is stronger than 
precept and it was he who set the example of 
planting trees and adorning the streets of the city 
and the roadsides by the farms. Amid the hard- 
ships incident to frontier life witli its multi- 
plicity of varied duties, he found tune within tw- 
or three years after his arrival here to proiure 
and plant sugar maples along the highway, and ti> 
the number of trees which he set out "the fir-t 
year he added from time to time until Maple 
avenue, or Bryant avenue, as it has been variously 
called, became a landmai-k and now remains one 
of the monuments to his memory. As soon as thi> 
trees could be secured he commenced to plant an 
apple orchard and in 184.5 established a nursery 
business, which has been continued in the Bryant 
name to the present time. A thorough botanist, a 
lover of nature, especially of trees and plants, Iv 
was always looking out for something new or rar'-. 
and on the oM homestead may now be foundl" - 
twien eiglm- and ninetv varieties of trees, many 



■,PTHUP BF 



PAST AM) J'lJKSKXT OF r.UJ;EAU COU.NTY 



of tlu'iu not coiniiiuu in the ^tatf, ati'l most of 
tliciu, exci-'pt some of the native varielies, planteii 
and cared lor by him. He was one of the organiz- 
ers of the NortliWL.-tern Fruit CTrowcrs' Associa- 
tion and a prominent and influential mcmler of 
the State Horticultural Society of northern Illi- 
nois, which societies he served as presiilent auil in 
various other ofhcial capacities. He was also vice- 
president of the AmericaTi rouiological Society 
and his opinions regarding questions relative to 
the nursery business were largely received as au- 
thority. His wife was one of those vigorous pio- 
neer women to whom, as much as t(.) the men, Illi- 
nois owes its JU'ogress. Of a kiinl. symiiaflirtic 
tem])ei-amont, she had a keen lo\(> for nature .lu.l, 
surviving her husband for se\rral \e;n-. she jia.--ed 
her declining" da \s amid the shelter of the fnendlv 
trees which she had wal.hed nyr,- from tlieir earlV 
planting. It was in the vear iSS'i that AitluiV 
r.rvaut. Sr., jiassed awav, while his wife sur\ivcd 
until IS'.Jl. 

Kinironment and iidierited tendencies com- 
bined to make it the natural thing that the sons 
of the Bryant family should liecoiue interested in 
the growing of trees. The ehlest son, Arthur 
Bryant, is now the head of tlie nursery liriii of 
Arthur Bryant & Sou an.l is widely iVcogiuzed 
as a prominent nurseryman aiul horticulturist, 
known throughout the state in this conucctiou and 
lionorcd as one of the ablest representatives of the 
business to which lie has "i\en his entire attcn- 



iiioadeliiiig ins kuouleilge eoUcernmg Uortleiilture 
in its vaiious pha^es. Few men are belter in- 
formed eoiiei'iimm tlie li.'si methods of growing 
fruit, and while mi. 'tested in all new theories his 
sound judgiiieii! reailily recognizes adaptability 
anil usefulness in tlie>e. He has for years been 
treasurer of the Slate Horticultural Society; has 
also been its president and vice-president and a 
member of its executive board. He has likewise 
been president and vice-president of the Xorthern 
Horticultural Society and was one of the three 
members of the commission having in charge tlio 
horticultural exhibit at the WorkFs Columbian 
F\]iositioii in Chicago in 1893. He has been and 
IS a prolific writer on horticultural subjects and 
has tlius become widely known throughout the 
eoiiiurv. 

itr.'Brvanl takes a deep inten .i in the cause 
of cdueati.m. He has been a member of the school 
hoard and lia- also been supervisor of hi- town- 
ship. His religious faith is indicated by liis n\em- 
beisliip ill the ricsbyteriau church and his various 
relations are with sucli organization; and interests 
ns stand for muierial, intellectual and moral i)rog- 
ress. Beared to the Inisiiiess with wliich he is now 
connected, he lias stcailily advaneed um:i he is 
recognized as one of the niost piv.ininem horti- 
culturists of Illinois and is also wiilely kiiown be- 
yond the borders of the state. 



Arthur Bryant, who,■^e name introduces this rec- 
ord, acquii-ed his early education in the |nililic 
scliools and continued his study under the direc- 
tion of Rev. A. B. Church and dame.- Smith of 
Princeton. He remained at home until his mar- 
riage in 18G-1 to Jliss Elizabeth Hughes, a native 
of Virginia and a daughter of George Hughes. In 
187-5 Mr. Bryant located on his present jilaci', com- 
prising one hundred and sixty acres of riih and 
jiroductive land, most of which is devoted to the 
growing of nursery stock. The work of iinprove- 
nient has been carried forward here until it is one 
of the best nurseries in tho_stato. It is pleasantly 
and conveniently situated a mile and a quarter 
south of Princeton and about sixty acres is de- 
voted to nursery stock, fruits, shrubs, ornamental 
trees, etc. He also has, south of his homestead, 
ninety-five acres in nursery and orchard, and, west 
of town, has two hundred acres which are largely 
used for the growing of trees. "Sir. Bryant has 
introduced the Salome apple, of which hn is mak- 
ing a specialty and, wliich because of its size, qual- 
ity and favor is finding a ready sale, thirty men 
being upon the road as representatives of the firm 
in the sale of tliis product and of the nursery 
stock. The farm is equipped with fine buildings 
and ofFii.es, having every modern convenience and 
accessory necessary to the successful conduct of 
the business along scientific lines. Mr. Bryant is 
botli progressive and prosperous and is continually 



alfi;ei) luxgbfx. 

Alfred Lungren, a fruit-grower residing on sec- 
tion 6, Leepertowu township, where he has a well 
improved farm of eighty-four acivs, was born in 
Bureau county, ^Nfarch V2, 1859, his parents being 
Charles and Mary (Rapp) Lungren. The mother 
now resides in Des iloines, Iowa, with her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. ilary Allmart, but the father passed away 
in 1SG2, at the age of forty-five years. He was 
born in the western part of Sweden, near Stock- 
holm, and came to Bureau county, Illinois, about 
fifty-five years ago, at which time he purchased 
land in Princeton township, where he engaged in 
farming. Unto him and his wife were born four 
children: Mrs. Anna Xorden, who died at the age 
of thirty-six years; Senna, the wife of Rev. Pier- 
sou, who died at the age of thirty years; Alfred, 
of this review, ami Mrs. Mary Allmart, of Des 
Moines, Iowa. 

Alfred Lungren was reared in Princeton town- 
ship, where he resided practically all of the time 
until he purchased his present farm tweuty-two 
years ago. He pursued a public-school education 
and in early nianliood was connected with farm 
labor. He spent about a year in Oregon but the 
middle west was a more congenial place of resi- 
dence to him and he returned here. He now has 
a finely improved farm and is making a study of 
horticultural pursuits. His attention is devoted 
mainly to fruit, including pea..hes and apples. 



PAST AX1» i'i;i 



Af corx'i'v 



n..li 



IS ph, 



Mi.s 



,iul (It (■i-ht 



uiiich 

ilii.st van'clh-s, liiivin,^ (vn, 

.Mr. J, uncivil «ns mai'i 
Aiii.-in.la \V(%trrlm-. ulio i 
1S(;J, in Suv.Irn, an. I uli, 
inoiillis was IjidU'^liL ici Ai 
August and Anna (IhuHcn) Westcili 
twelve 3-e;irs >[hjui in New "I'dik stale ami our in 
Jfielii-au they came to Jiuivau euuuty, Illuiois, 
ami the father, iu n/.-poiiM; i.i the country's need, 
enlistvd at J'rinerloii in ddVn.M- of the Union cause 
and wa.s luListered in as a iiicuiber of Company A, 
One Hundred and i'orty-eighth Illinois Voluuli.'rr 
Infantry at Quiuey, on the 31st of January, lS(;:i. 
Following the close of hostilities he was mustered 
-aut at Nashville, Tennessee, September 5, ISii". 
and continued his residence iu Bureau county 
throughout his renuiining days, jiassing away i.n 
Princeton, December 12, 1903, wlien seventy-one 
years of age. His wife dieil July 1?, I'JOO, at the 
age of sixty-three, ilrs. Luni,n-en has two sisters 
iu Priueeton, Mrs. Frank h'crd am! .Mrs. Wdhae.i 
Ellis. She also ha., a sistrr and brother in ("'i.i- 
cago. :\Irs. Ari-hie M.Donald and Albert Wcst- 
erlin- Mr. an.l .Mis. lammvii have one dauehter, 
l.eah May, born .May 10, l-.uH. 

Politically Mr. Lungren is independent, votii',,' 
for men and measures rather than for party, ll.; 
served for one term as road commissioner but li.s 
never been a politician in the sense of office sef^K- 
ing. He belongs to the Lutherau church and is 
interested in all that pertains to general improve- 
ment an.l progress along material, social ami intel- 
lectual lines. He has done much to further the 
fruit-raising interests of the CMinly ami is num- 
bered am.ing the leadins' agri.'uhii n-ts «( I p.'r- 

t.nvn townsiiii.. 



HEXIJY STAI'.LEK. 
Henry Stabler owns and operates a valuable 
farm of one hundred and seventy-seven acres in 
Noponset town.-hip. He is one of the native sons 
of this township, having been born ;\[arch 31, 
l.s.")'.i, up(.n the farm of his father, Robert Joseph 
Stabh'r. His mother bore the maiden mime of 
l[artha I'lrambles and they were well known farm- 
ing people of this portion of the county, repre- 
sented elsewhere in this work. The son was edu- 
cated in the public m Ii.ioU ami when not busv witli 
his tp.xt-books aide.l in th.' w..rk of the ' fwuh. 
When twenty-five years of age he started out in 
life on his own account ami tlu^ .pceiipati.jn to 
which he was reared he has mad.' hi- life work. 
He at first had sixty nen- of lan.l and lat.'r he 
purehas.'il on.' bun.li..l and -.M'lit.'n acres, con- 
is rich and i)r()duetive an.l re,-|Miml- r.'adily t.) 
tlie care and cultivation which i~ b.'-t.^ueil upm 
it. He has greatly im[)rove.I his re-i.l.'nee. mak- 



'",^- " '""■ "I II"' ' I'l tarn, pn.perti,-, ami 1.,. 

has iv.enlly cmpl.t.-.i a tin,, barn ^wll, e.,i,.,,,.- 
foundati-.n an.l e^..r> m.,d..rn . .,nv,m„ae e. 1|,. 
has alM, buiU a g.i...l orn crib au.l .-..rMion- 
about hi,-, pbu:e i. Ill k.vping \utli m.i.l.'rn id, -a- ,,; 
pr.igre.MW rarmin-. He mise^ g.i..d gi.el.'. .,f 
st.uk, inelu.ling cattl.', li..!-..- an, I h..-s, an.l l... 
ha.- nou on,, bun.livd an.l .■igbty-live li..g- upon 

Mr. Slabl.'r \^a, niarn,.!, February 13, ]SS1 
to Ml.- Ali.v J. F.uinplhuv. uh.. wa- l.,.rn ii[ 
ll.uiiv eonnlN, lllni..!-, Julv 1, isi;:;,. a .bumlit, r 
.d' d. J', llumi.herv, who i-^ ni,aili.ui,.'<l elM-ubei,' 
in till- v.nvk. I'heie aiv tluve iliil.hvii of tin- 
inarria-e; (Ib.nn, b,,rn N,.\enib.-r •,'.-.. bss 1 ; l.aura 
]•;., duly ■.'<;, IS,s:: an.l Kul.v 1... Januarv o, l.s'.Hj. 

.Mr. Stabler an.l hi- v. ilV'att.-n.l the ,-erM.vs of 
the .M,'tb,,di-1 l-;i.i-,-,.pal .liur.h. of wliieb .-he is 
a member an.l I., the ,-upp,,rt .d' which ho eon- 
tributes. II,' ha^ nc\.T cared foi' [uddic otlice or 
sought t.i fiuiire ]ii.imin,ntly in any public light, 
preri'riin.u to concentrate his time and attention 
upon hi- bu-iness affairs, and as the years bav.' 
■Mill, by lie has met with a ^ratifving measure of 
Mi.e,-^', Ih- enlir.' life ba^ b.vn passed in thi- 
...uintv an, I that h.' ha- live.l !:,,norubl\ at all 
tiiu,'-"'i- in,|i.'at,',l l.v tlu' fact tliat manv <d' Iii^ 
-tan,h,',-t fri.Mi;F are tli.i.-e wla. lur.e kn..wii biiu 
tr.,n, 1,1. b,,\h.i..,l an.l are familiar with his lilV 
history. 



WILLI.VM MAY. 

William :May is engaged in general favmiiu an.l 
stock-raising on section 16, Selby to\Mi-hip, \di, v.- 
he owns and operates a finely imi)rove<l farm oi' 
two humhc.l ami thirteen acres that he i)urchas.'d 
in I'.Hi-j. He ha- b.en clo.-ely identified with agri- 
cultural interests in his locality for many years 
aml is one of the native sons of the towu.-hip. 
his birth having occurred about a mile and a half 
south of Hollow avville, on the ISth of :March, 
ISdS, Ids paivnt.s being Mr. and Mrs. John 
George Ma\. The mother died during the early 
boyboi.d of'her .son William and the faiher passed 
away a number of years later. Both were nativc- 
of (itM-niany and came to Bureau county at an 
early day, casting in their lot with the pioneer 
settlers who were aiding in reclaiming this region 
for the uses of the white race. For a time tlie\ 
resided in Peru, T.a Salle county, and subsequently 
t.iok up their abode on a farm iu Selby township. 
Bur.'aii county. In the family were four sons an.l 
two .laughters: l.eonar.l. n resident of Peru; 
William; Henry. li\ing in S.lby t. .unship: Jae..b. 
whoso home is in Berlin t,,wnslii[); .Mrs. Barbara 
I.anir. of Berlin t.nvn-hip: an.l ^Irs. Annie Leve.-. 
of Hall t,,uM<bip. 

In till" i.iun-b.ip vdiere his birth occurre.l V.'ill- 
iani May \\a.< reare.l an.l Id-; cliieati.Mi was ae- 
,|nire,l ill til.' -.bo.ds of Ilollowavvill.'. He starte.' 
out ill life on his own account in 1.-.T0. wiu'n ab.Mit 




Mi;, AM> ^[i;s. iii:m;v stahlki;. 



PAST A.\l» I'Kl'.SKXT OF 



KKAl' cnrN'JV 



551 



the soil fiir liis living and bringing to boar in its 
cultivation jnai tiial knnwlodge ami keen discevu- 
inont. lie janLliased his present farm in 190"2 
and year iiy year the fields bring forth bounteous 
harvest, for he uses modern scientific methods of 
farming, the practical value of which he has proven 
in the actual vork of the Holds. 

.Mr. :\lav \va- married in this countv to :\liss 
I'liilopena" liable, wlio uas born in Selbv to\vn- 
ship, a daughter of George and Lena Ilalde. 
Unto ilr. and ^ilrs. ^May have been born five chil- 
dren, all nati\os of this county: George, who is 
married and reside> in Seliiy township; Mrs. Annie 
Fiste, of Sclby township ;' William, who is mar- 
ried and follnws farming in ISerlin township; 
Josc])h and Philiji, who assist in the operation of 
the home farm. 

The parents are members of the German Lu- 
theran church and in politics Mr. 3Iay is a demo- 
crat, but while he is never remiss in tlie duties of 
citizenship, he docs not seek or desire office. Pur- 
suing the even tenor of his way, watchful of tlie 
interests of his farm, mating the best rise of his 
advantages, he is conducting his business inter- 
ests in a manner produeliAC of good financial re- 
sults. 



THOMAS BUPDEX. 

Thomas Burden is now living retired, but still 
resides upon his farm in Fairfield township. He 
is one of the most extensive landowners of the 
county, his holdings embracing eighteen hundred 
acres, which he lenses to various parties. He first 
came to Bureau county in lS-50 and, being please^l 
with the country and its prospects, he decided to 
make his home here and located on his present 
farm on section 10 in 1852. Here for more than 
a half a century he has continuously lived and 
throughout this entire time has maintained a most 
unassailable reputation as an honoralile business 
man. He was born in Queens county, Ireland, in 
IS-'io, and was seventeen years of age when he 
crossed the Atlantic to the new world, settling first 
in \ew A'ork. AYliile there he worked on the rail- 
road lictwccn Syracuse and Rochester and laiil the 
first T rail in that state, such rails being used to 
rej)lace the old strap rails of the first roads. 

In tiie fall of ISIS he proceeded westward to 
Chicago and thence to Elgin, Illinois, where he 
was emjjloyed on the construction of the old Chi- 
cago & Galena Pailroad, while at a later date he 
also worked on the Chicago, Burlington &- Quincy, 
the Rock Island and other railroads. He had come 
alone to tliis country, his father having died in 
Ireland. At a later date his mother and other 
members of the family crossed the Atlantic and 
livpi] in Oswego, Xcw York, but from the time 
whrn he made the vovai:c to the new world Mr. 



Burden has depcudcil entirely ujxm his own re- 
sources. As stated, he aiiived first in Bureau 
county in 1S.J0 and two years later ijurchased his 
present home farm on section 10, Fairfield town- 
ship, on which he erected a lug house about ten by 
twelve feet in dimensions. His railroad work 
brought him the capital that enabled him to be- 
come the owner of land. He carefully saved his 
earnings and pre-empted his homestead, which cov- 
ers the northwest quarter of the section. He has 
added to this at difi'erent times and he is now 
the most extensive landowner in Fairfield town- 
ship, while his realty holdings are among the larg- 
est in the county. He has followed farming since 
securing his pre-emption claim about 1S54 and he 
has been largely interested in stock-raising, mak- 
ing a specialty of full blooded Ijurliam cattle. For 
a great many years he hauled his grain to Ster- 
ling, a distance of eighteen miles. lie has brought 
his land under a high state of cultivation and iias 
four residences and sets of farm buildings upon his 
large acreage. At the present writing he is practi- 
cally living retired save for the supervision whicli 
he gives to the management of his property, but 
for many years he did much manual toil and he 
has borne a very helpful and important part in 
reclaiming the prairies from ther wild condit'on 
anrl converting them into fine farms. 

Mr. Burden was married in La Salle, Illinois, 
to Miss Eleanor Fitzgerald, of Bureau county, 
who was a native of Queens county, Ireland, and 
who as a young girl went to Canada, whence she 
accompanied her parents on their removal to this 
state. Subsequently her parents came to Fairfield 
township. Bureau county, where they spent their 
remaining days. Her father died more than 
thirty-five vears ago, A\-hile her mother passed avv-ay 
in ISSC. "Mr. an.l ilrs. Burden long traveled 
life's journey happily together, but were separated 
by the death of the wife on the loth of April, 
1901, when she had reached the age of seventy- 
one years. 

ilr. Burden has eight living children; George, 
a resident farmer of Fairfield township, who mar- 
ried Posanna Wisley, who died four years ago, 
leaving ten children; Cluirles, a ;iartner of the 
firm of Burden I'rotliers. of Tampico, who mar- 
ried Kate Copmy and ha- seven ehildreu; John, 
v\ho manages the home place; ilary, who is the 
widow of Joseph Clyne and lives upon the iiome 
farm; Emma, the wife of William ]^IcCabe, super- 
visor of Gold tbwnshi[i, by whom she has three 
children; William, who is also a member of the 
firm of Burden Brothers, of Tamnico. and was 
married to !^^argaret Harty; Elizabeth, the wife 
of William Graham, of Sterling, Illinois; and 
XoUie, the wife of Richard K'^lley, a farzner of 
Fairfield township, by whom she has two sons. 
There wore also two children who died in in- 
fancy : Katie and one who died unnamed. 

Politically Mr. Burden is a democrat and has 
serveil as conimi<-i'^ncr af'l in soin" other local 



PAST AM) PIJK.SHX'J' OF lUHKAT (.'OLX'J'V 



ollkxvs mUIk.u-Ii hr lia,- iicv.'r .^oimlil or .k-iicl 
politiuil prclVrinrnt, liis l,u-int-^ iiitrrot-^ Inn- 
ing iiia.le clo<c- claim upnii Ins tiii.r and atlnitioii. 
In addition to aLi|uiiiiig i.'\U'n^i\ij prupuit} inter- 
ests in this cminty he also is tiie owner of four 
hundred and thirty acres of hind in Whiteside 
county. lie has a fuic residence in the village of 
Tani[)ioo and he holds nieniiicr>hi]) in the Catholic 
church tlicre. The life record of ilr. Burden may 
well serve as a source of iiisjiiration and encour- 
aoeinent to others, for when In came to the United 
States he was empty liamlrd, pn-;>essing only a 
strong heart and iinfahenu^ determination. He 
was aiiihitious to succeed, however, and scorned no 
honest work that would yield him a living. (.)ii 
railroad construction he made his start and as the 
years-[iassed he invested largely and judiciously in 
land until his present lioldings make him one of 
the wealthy residents of Fairiicld township. 



progres.-, and improvement, withluddijig his aid 
and co-operatioii from no movement that he be- 
lieves will prove of general good. He has refilled 
continuously in this county for almost half a cen- 
tury and has therefore been a witness of much of 
its growth. 



E.XOS M. HAYKS. 

Jmios M. Hayes, living m New Bedford, was 
born in Putnam, Hlinois, August 7, IS-Jo, and 
has been a resident of Fairfield township since 
1857, when he accompanied his parents on their 
removal to Bureau county. Fie is a son of An- 
drew J. and Nancy (Brown) Hayes. His father 
was born in Indiana, July 29, 1820, and his 
mother's birth occurred in the same state, Febru- 
ary 28, 1830. They arrived in Hlinois in the 
'30s and, as stated, became residents of Bureau 
county in 18.57. 

Enos M. Hayes acquired his education in tlie 
district schools of Fairfield township and in that 
locality was reared to farm labor and was con- 
nected with agricultural interests there until 1894. 
when he came to New Bedford, where he has since 
lived, his attention being given to various Iju-iiK^ss 
enterprises. 

On the 13th of March, 1872, Mr. Playes was 
married to Miss Nettie Failing, who was born in 
Iroquois, Hlinois, September 10, 185-5. She, too, 
was brought to Bureau county in her childhood 
days and her early education was acquired in the 
public schools of Wyanct, while later she became a 
high-school student in Princeton. Eight children 
have been born of this marriage, of whom one is 
now deceased. Those still living are: Laura M., 
born October 30, 1874; Percy J., May 25, 1880; 
Lena M., November 30, 1884 ; Itowena E., August 
1, 1S8G; Irvin A., May 13, 1889; :\[elva M., Mav 
15, 1893; and Barnal C, October 2, 1899. 

Mr. Hayes exercises his right of f ranch ire in 
support of the men and measures of the republican 
party and is interested in its success and keeps 
well informed on the issues of the day. His fam- 
ily are all members of the Church of Christ. He 
is now living in comfortable circumstances in New- 
Bedford. For five years he served as constable of 
Greenville township and is interested in public 



LEWIS .lA.MKS ]101..MJ':>>. 

Lewis James Holmes operates a valuable farm 
of two hundred and fifty-five acres, of which he 
owns one hundred and si.N;ty-fivc acres. This is 
situated in JIacon township and in its well im- 
proved condition there is iiidicatimi of the care- 
ful supervision of the dwiici'. 

ilr. Holmes was born in Macon lownsliiii, Au- 
gust 7, ISnO. His parents weie I.ewir- and Sarah 
(Coate) Holmes. The father wa-^ born m Wind- 
ham county, Connecticut, Augu-t 10. isM. and 
was the only child of Thomas and Jeru-ha 
Holmes. He was reared upon a farm, acquired 
a common school education and remained with 
his parents until he attained his majurily, assist- 
ing in the cultivation of tlie farm, suliseiiucnt lo 
which time he worked in the woolen an(l cotton 
manufactories of I'lholc Island and Massachusetts 
until 1838. He then went to Oneida county, New 
York, and spent a year work'ng on the Erie 
canal, after which he was again connected with 
woolen manufacturing interests in ^Madison coun- 
ay, wdiere he remained until 1S4S. He then came 
to Illinois, settling on the present site of the 
village of Providence, having purchased a quar- 
ter section of land there before leaving the east. 
He did not like the location, however, as he de- 
sired to live where there was some timber, and 
he purchased a quarter section of land from the 
government in J\Iacon town.ship at a dollar and a 
quarter per acre. There were no improvements 
upon it and his first dwelling was a log cabin. 
By industry and thril't hr nni only added much to 
his original tract of land but al.-o had a com- 
fortable residence and good buildings with mnd- 
ern improvements. The journe\ westwai-d uas 
made l,v wav of the lakes to CliR'ngn, thence by 
canal t.', T>a Salle and on to :\[ae<m t.e.vnship. In 
]s,-,() he bought eightv acic- and a- his financial 
n.'s.mrcrs increased he added to his jiroperty un- 
til at one time he had si.\ hundre^d and fifty acres 
of land. He was one of the pioneer settlers and 
broke the wild prairie and did other arduous work 
connected with the development of a new farm. 
His entire life was devoted to farming and stock- 
raising and his capable business managenicnl i- 
indi.-atcd by the excellent results whieli folbwed 
his elforts. ' 

I-cwis Holmes was twice married, his first union 
being witli :\[iss Flannah Lee. whom he wedded. 
in Connecticut in 1837. Unto this marriage were 
born si.x children: Mary, the wife of I. W. Eaton. 
a resident of Buda ; William H., who is married 
and resides in South Dakota; Emma L.. the wif'' 



]'AS'r A.XJi 1' 



J'.lilKAL' COLM'V 



or ll.MU-y White; Gala.<li,i L., who uas l,oiii Vvh- 
ruavy 31, 1817, and is living in this county; 
Lewis B., vlio was born :May 1, IS-U), and died 
Maivli 31, ISoI); and Klk'n j", who was hoin De- 
cember 5, lSo3, and died February IS, 1S58. 
Having lost his first wife, Lewis Holmes, Sr., 
married Jliss Sarali Coatc, of England, on the 
•2:Ah of September, ISCO, and they had three 
children, of whom George W. and Lewis James 
are living, while a danghter, Dell, who was the 
second child, was born November 3, 18G1, and died 
November 10, ISSl. The death of the wife and 
mother occurred November 29, 1898, eight weeks 
prior to the demise of her husband. Lie passed 
away at liis home in ilacon township January 21, 
1899, at the age of eighty-four years, five montlis 
and eleven days. In politics he was a republican 
and served as assc^^sor for forty years. He was also 
school director and trustee and was a firm friend 
of the public schools. He lived an upright life 
and had the respect and esteem of all who knew 
him. His wife, who was born in Essex county, 
Ensland, August 2.3. 1827, came to America in 
tlw fall of 18,5-1, landing' in ShefTield, after a 
voyage of six weeks and three days. She was 
formerly a member of the Church of England. 
Sirs. Holmes l;ad a kind word for every one and 
was always ready to lend a helping Iiaud to those 
in need. In the community she was mourned as 
a true friend and in the family circle is greatly 
missed. It can truly be said of her that those 
who knew her best loved her most. 

Lewis James Llolmes pursued his education in 
the jniblic schools and was reared upon Irs fa- 
ther's farm in ilacon township, early becoming 
familiar with the duties and labors that fall to 
the lot of the agriculturist. He began farming 
on his own account when twenty-eight years of 
age and his time and energies are now given to 
the further development and improvement of two 
hundred and fifty-five acres of land, of wliich he 
at present owns one hundred and sixty-five acres. 
In all of his work he is energetic ami di'temiincd, 
carrying forward to successful compli'ti'm wliat- 
evcr he undertakes. 

On the .5th of April, 1888. :Mr. Holmes was 
united in marriage to Miss Henrietta Sanfleben, 
who was born in Germany, May 7, 1865, and is a 
daughter of Henry and Christiana (Dahl) San- 
fleben, who were likewise natives of that country 
and came to the L'nited States in 18GS. They 
located near Xeponsct, Illinois, and the father 
worked out as a farm hand. Later he bought 
ninety-two and a half acres of land and suljse- 
quently purchased one hundred and sixty acres 
north of Kewance. In 1901 he purchased a resi- 
dence in Neponset, where he and his wil'v are 
now living, having put aside the more active 
cares of a busine.-s career. ^Ir. Sanfleben is a 
democrat, having given his allegiance to tlie par- 
ty since becoming a naturalized American citizen. 
I nto him and his wife have been born four <'hil- 



dreu; Loui-a. Cliarlrs, M,-. llojmcs and llmry. 

The marriag.' of .Mi. and Mrs. Ilolinr^ lias 
been bles.-ed with nine rbildicn: Lr\w~ IL, Eva 
B., Sarah C, Lii;/.ie 11., Grace }.].. Kiil.v JL, 
Bessie M., George W. and Cecjl E. .Air. llolmes 
voti's with the republieau party and has served as 
school director for the past seven years. His 
interest in everything pertaining to the welfare 
of the community is indicated by his efforts to 
promote pidilic progrcs.> and advance the material 
development of the countv. His entire life has 
lieen passed in .Maeou township and the .-ons-'usus 
of pul)lie opinion regarding him is altogeihcr fa- 
vorable. 



E1!A\K <;ei;e('K. 

Frank Geberk is a repn sentati\e of tlie farming 
interests of Concord township. His ]iarents, Con- 
rad and Christina (l)uvwald) G check, came to 
Buda, Illinois, in July, 18.")?, from Brunswick, 
Gcrnnmy. They wen; farnn'ng jieojile and spent 
their remainin-^ d.ivs in I'.uri ;ni eotintv. id'^ntifnil 
with its ai;-rieultuia] inh iv>l>. The father's denth 
occurred 'in .luTir, ISHI. wlnb- his wife passed 
auav IVbruaiv T. . iss:;. 

Frank Goliuuk aoiiir..! bi> prdiminary educa- 
tion in the district >eliools and aftei'ward continued 
his studies in Shefllcld. He spent his youth upon 
the home farm, working with his father through 
the period of his boyhood and after comj)leting his 
education until the time of the father's death. 
He still resides on the old home jdaee but has 
added many acres to the farm, nuiking purchase 
from time to time until within the boundaries of 
the old homestead are now conrprised one hundred 
acres. He has been verv energitic and capible in 
his farm work an,l the fields' have been Inought 
under a high state of cultivation and I'eturn to 
him golden harvests for the care and labor he be- 
stows upon them. There are good l)uildings and 
modern ecpiipments on the farm ami none of the 
accessories of a model place of the twentieth cen- 
tury are lacking. On the contrary everything in- 
dicates the spirit of enterprise which dominates 
the owner and lias made him a successful agri- 
culturist. 

As a companion and. hel[uitare for life's journev 
:Mr. Gebeck chose :\liss Atelissa Win-^low, of Buda, 
to whom he was married on the 1st of June, 1892. 
She is a daught:ir of Gardner and Christina Wins- 
low, who were farming jicople of this countv. The 
young couple now have three childivu: Charles 
Ravmond, born Januarv 5, 1.894; Fred Bryan, 
born November 22, ISD.V. and Ilazd Bertha. Sej)- 
tember 19, 1S9T. 

In his political alfiliati.m Mr. Gebeck is a demo- 
crat, always giving stanch allegiance to the jjarty 
and its principles. He holds me;nber.ship in the 
German Lutheran church and the cause of cduca- 
ti'.n has found in him a warm and stalwart friend 
durip • hi- tuentv-onr vear>' s.rviee as a school 



PAST AND jm;i:skxt of ]iii;i;Ar cor.N'j'V. 



dii-fctor, iu which time lie has labored ellVvtively 
and earnestly to uphold the standard of the schooU 
and promote their eftieicncy. Speudintr his en- 
tire life in this loeality, he is well known as a 
■representati\c of its farming interests ami his 
sucee.-s is lar-.'h attributable to his earnL.-t l::bnrs. 



EDWAKD TIXLEV. 

For nearly a half century Edward Tinb-y. now 
deceased, was a well known business man of I'.u- 
reau county. He was a native of Southwall, Eng- 
land, born September 22, 1S33, and was a son of 
Samuel and Sarah Tinley, both of whom were 
natives of the same country. 

Samuel Tinley was engaged in the grocery and 
bakery business in his native country for many 
years. Wishing to better his condition, and know- 
ing of the possibilities in the United States for 
one in limited circumstances, he resolved to make 
this country his future home. Accordingly, in 
184Sj he came with his family and first located 
near Frankfort, Illinois, where he bought a farm 
and engaged in its cultivation for five years. He 
then moved to ^vhat is now known as Tinley Park, 
which was named in his honor, and he was made 
station agent of the Chicago, I'ock Island iSc Pa- 
cific liailroad, which position he filled for twenty- 
four years, when he resigned and for two years 
lived a i-etired life in that village, or until his 
death at the age of seventy-four years. In the 
same village the death of his wife occurred many 
years ago. Of their children, but two are now 
living: Samuel, who lives in Xebraska; and 
Charles, residing in Chicago, who is a passenger 
conductor on the Chicago, Eock Island >.*c Pacific 
Eailroad. 

Edward Tinley was but fifteen years of age 
when he came with his parents to the I'nited 
States. In his native country he attended the 
public schools and received in thenr the founda- 
tion of an education that was supplemented in 
the school of experience in after life, lie being 
what might well be termed a self-educated as well 
as self-made man. He was a close observer of men 
and events and put the knowledge thus obtained 
to a practical use. 

On his arrival iu this country, Edward Tinley 
assisted his father in farm work for a time, after 
which he went to Tinley Park, where, on ilarch 
29, 1854, he entered the employ of the railroad 
company, first pumping water at tlieir tank in 
that place, and then as switchntan, baggageman 
and assistant to his father as station agent. In 
18.3G he went to DePue, where ]:e served as station 
agent. 

While still living in Tinley Park he was mar- 
ried, Septeml'er 22, lS->5, to Miss I'orcas A. Kit- 
tell, at ;Mcndota, Illinois. She is a daughter of 
Rev. Ephraim and Hannah Kittell. Her fatlier 



was uuc of the pioneers of I'u Page count}. Illi- 
nois, wliere he engaged in fanning and al,-,i m 
preaching the gospel as a minister iu the Jiapii^r. 
church. He was well and favorably known lu 
the people of Hu Page and adjoining coimiiLs 
and was respected for his sterling worth and hia 
labors of love in the gospel ministry. He made 
De Page county his home until his death. His 
wife also died in that county. 

There were no children born to i[r. and Mr.-. 
Tinley, but they partially reared several, includ- 
ing Sarah Bansor, who was ilr. Tinley "s cousin; 
and Gardner L. and Loretta IT. Kittell, childi\-u 
of Warren Kittell, who was a brother of ^fis. 
Tinley and died at Memphis, Tennessee, Juiu' 
17, 18G4:, while in the Union service. Mr. and 
;\Irs. Tinley also reared Jessie Stephens, a daugh- 
ter of Sarah luinsor Stephens, aud she became the 
wife of Frederick A. Tyug, a contractor of South 
Ottawa, Illinois, where his death occurred iu the 
summer of 190G by drowning, a son also losing 
his life at the same time and in the same way. 
Mr. Tyng was born and reared in Provideuee, 
Bureau countv-. His widow still resides in South 
Ottawa. 

After marriage, Jlr. and :iLrs. Tinley moved, to 
Trenton, now De Pue, Bureau county, where he 
became station agent for the Chicago, Pock Island 
& Pacific Eailroad, which position he held for 
nutny years to the satisfaction of the patron- of 
the station aud the traveling public. The duties 
of that position did not require his entii'e time, 
so he engaged in other lines of business from 
time to time, and was quite successful as a busi- 
ness man. In ISiiO he engaged in buying and 
shipping grain. He also, about the same time, 
entered into partnership with .lacob Bernhaid, ^v 
Ilassler in the general mercantile trade and eon- 
tinued in that line for several years, adding ma- 
terially to his bank account. For some years af- 
terward he engaged in the lumber and coal busi- 
ness in connection with morehandising, being al- 
ways a very busy man. 

While residing in De Pue. Mi'. Tinley served a- 
postmaster, notary public, justice of the peaee, 
school director and a member of tlie town b..ar.!. 
In every position filled, he served with entire' s.it- 
isfaction to his constituents, ami with credit w 
himself. In politics lie was always a stanch re- 
publican, attaining his majority and rights as ,in 
Americaii citizen about the time the republie:ir-. 
partv came into existence. He conscientio'i-ly 
voted that ticket until 1802, when lie voted f^r 
Grover Cleveland, who then was for the seemid 
time elected to the presidency. Unlike many ■>\h- 
ers he did not leave his party, but as a free Amen- 
can citizen exercised hi= right to vote as 'v 
thought best. Sociallv he was a memiier of !'•• 
Pne h.,li:e, I. 0. 0. F.,"and Princeton lodgv. A. F. 
& A. M. In early life he tmited with the M-:'.- 
odist Protestant church and was identified wit:. 



\ I 

\ I 

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ly^ <c=<_^ ^f vy'^ 6^l^{ y-L-^ 



7 



Cv ^lyC^^J ^^ , Ji^i^C^u 



PAS' 



AM) J- 



;k\'J' of r.u 



NIA'. 



5.VJ 



•,li;it l)Oilv until the cliuivh broke up, aflrr wliic-li 
I,,' and liis wiff atloiidod the elninhes \v\nd\ they 
louiid most couveiiioiit. 

For more than t\vcut\- years before his death 
Mr. 'J'lnky vas in poor health and in 1S;>5 sold 
iiis business interests iu De Puo and decided to 
travel for both pleasure and health. He and hi? 
uile visited many points of inlere.st botli in Amcr- 
iea and abroad. In ISTG they visited Xiagara 
falls, Bulfalo, Xew York city, Washington, Phil- 
adelphia and the Centenuial Exposition. Iu 1S?S 
ihey crossed the Atlantic and traveled through 
Kii'dand. soiug to Livcrpiool and ^lan'Inster, the 
birUiplaco^ of Mr. Tinley. They aU, visited 
.-^oiitlnvall and the cathedral where he was; cliris- 
icued in tlw Episcopal church; Newark, where 
Ills parents "were living when they started for 
Anieriia: Xottin,i;luuii, Lincoln, London, Exeter 
:iiid lieautiful 't'oiijuay wxre also visited. In 
l'ran(e they attended the Paris exposition and 
went to places of interest surrounding. They af- 
terward traveled to Brussels and in Germany took 
a trip down the Pihino to Cologne, seeing P.ingen; 
Itlieinsieiu Castle, two hundred and sixty feet 
above the river; Mayence and Strausburg, wliere 
diey saw the fa jons clock; also Heidelberg, with 
its tiniversity ai J castle; and Baden Baden, where 
they enjoyed tac famous baths. Continuing on 
their way they traveled through Switzerland to 
Lucerne and went up the cog railroad on ilouat 
Ifigi, where the fog obscured the view, which 
jhoiild have extended for one hundred miles. They 
also visited Zurich and Geneva, with the sky above, 
the blue water beneath and the snow- capped 
mountains, making a scene of beauty aluiost in- 
describable. From Geneva they proceeded by 
coach to Chainonny, a distance of about sixty 
miles, and then on mules made their way up 
Mount Blanc to Montanvert, a height of five thou- 
sand three hundred and sixty-six feet. Leaving 
the mules there, they walked down the mountain 
to Mer-de-Glace (sea of ice), which resembles 
gentle waves frozen. At one place they crossed a 
strip of ice well hacked to prevent slipping. The 
strip was about six feet wide with large crevasses 
on each side four or five feet wide and of great 
depth, so that when a stone was thrown into one, 
several seconds would elapse before it reached the 
bottom. On one side towered Mount Aiguille du 
Dru to a height of twelve thousand five hundred 
and seventeen feet; on the other side Aig du 
Moine, eleven thousand two hundred and fourteen 
feet — a sublime scene. After walking some dis- 
tance the party proceeded down ilauvais Pas. 
For a short distance the path is made of steps 
hewn in the rock, of various widths and depths, 
^nd an iron rod is attached to the rocks to which 
one may cling for safety, as tlie glacier is a hun- 
dred or more feet down and the rock is nearly 
perpendicular. The face of tlie rock also extends 
'ipwards several hundred feet, as the steps are cut 
f>n the side of the mountain, and at intervals 



wnler from iiwlliiig snow ainne dashes aero.-s the 
steii.^. At the ei-wlciii. the parly may again 
mount the niuh s, vihiili make llieir waj' over a 
iiarro\i- path, turning very sharp corners, ilr. 
I'inley and oUht^ of the parly walked down, but 
]\rrs. Tinlry rode. Th.y afterward visited Berne 
and the bear pits :ni.l fe\eial other points of inter- 
est and later ivtiinird to Paris and England. In 
1889 they again cru.-cd the Atlantic, visiting rel- 
atives in various towns in England and also going 
to the English lakes and to Scotland, visiting 
Edinburgh, Glasgow and the birthplace of Piob- 
ert Burns near Alloway kirk. The house is still 
standing and has a roof of thatch two feet thick. 
The bed slood in a recess of the living room and 
there was one pane of glass at the head of the 
bed and on the other side four small lights. A 
large fireplace was i.>n the side of the room oppo- 
site the bed and on one side of it some shelves 
contained a few pieces of the crockery once in 
possession of the jioefs mother. Mr, and Mrs. 
Tinley also went to Melrose Abbey and Abbots- 
ford, the home of Sir AValter Scott, and after vis- 
iting London and Paris again returned home. In 
the fall of IS'Ji they went to California and 
Oregon and iu lS9o visited the City of Mexico, 
returning by way of Xew Orleans and down the 
gulf to Florida. In 1S9G they visited Xassau, 
Bahama Islatids. About 1S9S they went to Can- 
ada, going through the Lacliino rapids in the 
St. Lawrence river, to 3Ionlreal and Quebec, and 
after returning to the L'nited States went up 
Blount Washington and to I'ortland, Maine, and 
to Boston. On visititig Canada again they went 
from Quebec to the Chicoutine Falls, then down 
tlie Saguetiay river into the St. Lawrence and up 
that river to Quebec and to Montreal by rail. This 
was the last extended trip ^Ir. Tinley made, and 
in all their travels they said they never savi- any- 
thing as grand as Xiagara Falls. 

Mr. Tinley returned to Chicago to live a retired 
life, making his home in various hotels, including 
the Southern, Saratoga, Morrison and Plaza. In 
1903, while residing in the last named hotel, he 
was taken seriously ill, and there died June 2, 
1903. By his request his body was cremated at 
the crematory near Graceland cemetery, on the 
Saturday following. The ashes were placed iu 
a small receptacle that had been prepared under 
his direction. The receptacle was sealed and sent 
to the relatives. On Thursday, June 11, the 
ashes were conveyed to Princeton, and on arrival 
at the depot the funeral party was met by rep- 
resentatives of tlie ilasonic order, who acted as 
an escort. Princeton and Bureau ilasonic lodges 
and Poyal Arch Masons accompanied the funeral 
cortege to the cemetery, and arriving there the 
beautiful ifasonic burial service was read over 
the remains, after which they were placed in the 
larger receptacle prejiared for them. The cere- 
mony was \\itnes.-ed by many people from the 



i'\^T AM) PUKSKXT OF l^niKAl (•(„XTV. 



il\ ;U 



iia.l ,u;Ul„.n.,l 



, '" ""■ '''■'■' "i' -^11^'^' a man 'a-. F,|u,,',l Tml . 

'l;:,'';,;- """■'' "-^ si,„„i,i u. a,, :.^:!utj.u!!2 

rule. ° - o""i'-" 

Since tlu- death of lier In,.l,a!i,I M,< Tn.lrv 
-has traveled exteusively all nver tlii^ rouiun an;] 
still spends much of h,a- tm,,. m tleu .av"'la 
1.X'... however she detennin.d to mak. J'nuee- 

^eet ■, ; '■^■^';1""-^ ou South Main 

St et ulR. , u!ih hri- n-i,h,.u and iii.v... an.l the 
latter s ehildreti. sh. nou resides. 11.., hou e 
always o,.en to fn.nd. and ,vlat,v>.. „ am o 
whom partake n( ]„t ho.pilalitv fr,,,", ii„;, , 
time, and who deli'dd to h,. m l,;,- ,„■, „ %., 

traveled life's iou,.n,,v with ],erhu.had;.rn,a;v 
years, partakin,^ with hua of it, jovs and s .^ 

nun,.d ,,U,i.a:l^l;,:t:rttm 

n.e mth hm, to ..„,„v thr Miss of an eternal lif. 

«Jiue s,.m,u and doatli sJiall never come. 



C.\1'TAL\- EKASTL'S DEWTSOX BILL 
Laptam Erastus Dennison Rill, decoa^^cd wis 
a represontativc_ of a picturesque maritime e.x- 
Denence when viewed in the light of the present 
iniprovements in navigation, for ho was one of 
the very last of the old-time seamen who cir- 
cumnavigated the globe under canvas Ho 
passed away at Sheffield, December 23, 1905 hon- 

ri"[ h'?^ '^^- '^■^' ^'^ ^-''^ 1^"^- ^i">. ^^i it 
IS meet that his history be eiven a place in thi^ 

and favorably known in Bureau countv. His birth 
occurred at Groton, Connecticut. May 13, 1S2G 
He came o an ancestry distinguished for iovaltv; 
o liio*- ?";■'"-. '''''^ ^' a =°l'li«>- in thJ wai- 
the rSlV ' ^" grandfather wa.s a soldier of 

the cololi"^'''' ^-^ ^'^ ^-^'"^ ^-^ ■'^ defender of 

oinfni tr ''"'' 1" ^'^"^ ^■^'- f-^-- inrlepcndenee, 

joining the army when he was only sixteen years 

Bpdieving that ho would find a seafari-xr Wfo 



years and won promotion from time to time in, 
I'c became first officer on one of tl in .' 

I'l'per ships sailing from Xew York .\f .. '^^ 
t"o-years cruise on one occasion they inou'd',' 
home thirty-seven hundred casks of oil '' ' 

On leaving the sea Captain Bill becam. , 
resident of the middle welt and was id" ,;, ' 
-til mercantde interests in Ottawa, Illinois pn! 

>' the establishment of his home in Shet held 
I^ater he removed to Plynmuth, Indiana b,' 
finally r,t„i,cd to Bureau county and l.v'od 

death. In his business career he won the succc-, 
which comes through close application and r , 
^i.^l.-nt, earnest efTort. He did not cnga-^e in 
M'eculation or place his trust in any fortunate 
combination of circumstances but kbo d d : 
gcntl3 and perscvcrngly for what he acquired a, d 
tnjo^ed. In addition to his farming interests i„ 

!;«;»„„,,,,,, ,,.,,,,„.,,,,,„=„„^„^,--;; 

Captain Bill \vas married twice. On the 1st of 
September, 1857, he wedded Ada Mary We . 
Plymoutl,. Indiana, a daughter of Dr. Charlr- 
and Ada Mary (Messenger) Vest, who were o? ' I 
nallj Iron, Massachusetts and became resident 
of Indiana about 1S4.5. They are still Jivin.' 1 
fami v''f'"--' ~Tf.'^ 'SO. Captain Bill h.^d a 
tamil) of nine children. Emma Frances became 

Xebr'v-VEf"'"' \\ ^^"^'^«^^^'' °f Borchestor 
^n ;li Tl '"'V-' "^- ^^'S^- Charles Dennison 
ma med Iheresa Reese, of Green .Mountain, Iowa 
September 2S, 1892. Henry Avery was n arr-'ed 
October 16 1896, to Bessie' McCarroll, of Gre 
3roun a,n Iowa. Albert Edward wedded Lena 
Uctaua Cumrnmgs, of ShefTield, March 7, lOoi 

of Utica, Illinois, May 4, 1S9S. Fred Arthur nnw 
aSnSnl ^'"^'F^.'^' '^^d rents one hundred 
and h^enty acres adjoining, making his home with 
hi. mother. He is a veteran of the Spani.l;- 
American war. having enlisted in the navv, M^av 
^-t, lbJ8, as ordinary seaman on the steamshij. 
Incus a duspatch boat. He was in the Havana 
blockade and was discharged in Aucrust ISOs and 
retired on account of illnes.s. Fannie Louise wi< 
TZ^'i ^r-T'^*^^ S. 1899, to Allen 0.' Stotso',,. 
of Shcffichh Lnura Eva became the wife of Bm 
>.orris. of Tiskilwa, April 1, 1901. Hatiie Ada. 
^Nho was the second in order of birth, and wl,.. 
died September 6. 1890. was the wife of Iloi„." 
Thomas to whom she was mairied Xo^ ember >' 
lob..). 

In his political view.. Caj-tain Bill was an iu- 
deprMident and always kept informed on nue-tlon- 
and issues of the day. so that he was able t.. pur- 
port his position by intelligent argument. H- 
never ..ouglit office but wa^ school director f-- 
many year.. He was naturally a fluent speak.-r 
and one of the best |,osted men in hU c-uMmnd',- 
on matters of curnm! interest. He hMd menibor- 
--liip in the Congregational church, in which he 







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PAST AND J'];i:SEXT OF BUKKAU COUXTY. 



.503 



acted as deacon, and his life was in harmony with 
his professions. His was in many respects an 
eventful and interesting career. Long before the 
Spauish-Araerioau war or before Commodore 
Pewey had captured JIanilla Captaiu Bill had 
walked the streets of that island city and for a 
few months he was in California among the 
miners who sought gold on the Pacific coast fol- 
lowing its discovery in 1818. He visited Japan 
and China before their ports were open to for- 
eign trade and was also at the Sandwich islands 
before the influence of civilization had scarcely 
taken root there. He visited many other ports 
of the globe and retained to the last many inter- 
esting recollections of those early days and the 
varied experiences which they brought to him. At 
all times he manifested the good qualities of a 
considerate neig]il)or, a faithful friend, a devoted 
husband and father and an upright, conscientious 
citizen. Thus, when he passed away, in the seven- 
ty-ninth year of his age, he left beliind him a 
name which is honored and respected, and he well 
deserved a place upon the pages of the history of 
his adopted county. He left a valuable and well- 
improved farm of eighty acres, whereon his widow 
and son make their home, but he cared not to ac- 
cumulate wealth. He was kind-hearted and lost 
considerable by being too easy with those indebted 
to him. 



ULYSSES G. HAYDKX. 

Ulysses G. Ilayden, a representative member 
of the I^ureau county bar and a leader in repub- 
lican circles, is practicing in Princeton where, in 
recognition of his skill and broad professional 
learning, a liberal clientage is accorded him. He 
was born in Kentucky, on the 28th of February, 
1868. His father, Eobert W. Haydcn, was also 
a native of that state and a representative of an 
old Kentucky family. The mother, who bore the 
maiden name of Jennie Reeves, was likewise born 
in Kentucky. Robert "W. Hayden v.-as a farmer by 
occupation, following that pursuit throughout his 
entire life save for the period of the Civil war, 
when he joined the Union army and served 
throughout the entire pei'iod of hostilities as a 
defender pf the national government. He died 
February 20, lOOG, at the age of seventy-seven 
years. 

Ulysses G. Hayden, whose name forms the cap- 
tion of this review, pursued his "ducation in Ken- 
tucky. His elder brother, Elijah, was engaged in 
farming in Bureau county, Illinois, and because 
of this Ulysses G. Hayden came to this state about 
18SG and continued his education in Princeton 
high school. On completing his course there^ he 
engaged in teaching school for several years in 
Bureau county and was a capable educator, who 
imparted clearly and concisely to others the 
knowledge that he had acquired. At length he 
entered a law office in Chicago, havnig in the 



meantime devuicl his leisure hours to the study 
of law while connected ^^■ith the system of public 
instruction. He afterward attended the Chicago 
Law School and the law scliool of the Northwest- 
ern University, from both of which he was grad- 
uuated with the degree of Bachelor of Law. He 
then pursued a special law course in Hlinois Col- 
lege of Law and was admitted to practice before 
the Supreme court of Illinois, also the United 
States district court and the United States cir- 
cuit court. He entered upon the active work of 
the profession in Chicago and at the same time 
practiced considerably in Princeton and in other 
states, including Indiana, Alabama, Louisiana and 
Kentucky. He located in Princeton in 1901 and 
has since been a leading member of the bar with 
a large and distinctively representative clientage. 
He throws himself easily and natural into the ar- 
gument in the trial of a caus.^ There is no 
straining after efl'ect, but on the contrary a pre- 
cision and clearness in his statement and an acute- 
ness and strength in his argument which speaks 
a mind trained in the severest school of investiga- 
tion and to which close reasoning is habitual and 
easy. 

ilr. Hayden is recognized as a leader in re]iub- 
lican circles, doing active and effective work foi 
the party, in the success of which he is deeply 
interested. He is now serving as an alilennaii of 
tlie fourtli ward. 

On the 7th of June, 1S94, Mr. Hayden was 
united in marriage to Miss Cora ]\I. Riley, a 
daughter of Joseph Riley, of Princeton, and they 
have two children. Leta M. and Glenn R. ilr. 
Hayden is a member of the Princeton Alas.jnic 
lodge and of Peace Lodge, I. 0. 0. F. He is 
likewise afHliated with other societies, is a mem- 
ber of the Chicago Law Institute and of the Jlcth- 
odist Protestant church, in the work of which, he 
takes an active and helpful interest, serving at 
the present writing as superintendent of the 
Sunday school. He occupies a beautiful home on 
North ;\rain street, which he erected in 190-5. His 
nature is kindly, his temperament genial and his 
ideals high. In political thought and action he 
has always been independent, carrying out his 
honest views without fear or favor and his life 
has been one of continuous activity, in which has 
been accorded due recoonit'on of labor. 



HANS SANDBKRC;, 
Hans Sandberg is one of the extensive land- 
owners of Bureau county and is a self-made man 
whose prosperity has come as the direct and legiti- 
mate outcome of his own labors and perseverance. 
He was born in Sweden, June 9, IS-")?, a son of 
Hans and JMatilda (Johnson) Sandberg. The 
father was born in Sweden in August. 1823, whii-e 
the mother's birth occurred in that country in 
June, 1R51. She is still living; but the father 



PAST AM) 1'i;i:si:m' of iiri; 



torxTV 



pa=>C(l away iji ]Oo:!, at the a--' o( ri-hly ycar.^. 

Hans Sandberg, wliose name iiitiuihicc- this re- 
view, spent tlic lirst twenty-four years of his life 
in the land of liis nativity and there ae(|uired lii> 
education, Imt thinking to iiii|.Mi\e hw linaiu-i.il 
condition in the new world, lie ( ro.--r,l llir Aflantie 
in ISSl, locating in I'Litnaui, lllnidi.-. \\here he 
lived for three years. On the expiratiHU of that 
period he went to Bureau Juntti..n in Iliireau 
county, where lie also spent three years, after 
which he reniovcd to Walnut, wliere he has siui.; 
resided. That his life has heeri one of untiring 
activity and enterprise is iudieJted hy tlie fact 
that he is today the owner of six hundred aci'es 
of land worth one hundred dollars uer acre, of 
wliich three hundred and twenty acres lies on sec- 
tions IS and ID, Walnut township, wliile two hun- 
dred and seventy-three and one-half acres is on 
section 30, Greenville township. He had ahout 
eight hundred dollars when he came to AiiK.Tica 
and that he is now one of the suljstaiuial iv<;ilents 
of Bureau county is due to his hard \u<vk and his 
frugality. His industry and enterprise ha\e won 
him the admiration and respect of all who know 
him and his business record is such as any man 
might be proud to possess, for he has always been 
prompt in meeting his financial obligations, in 
keeping his engagements and in performing any 
task that has devolved upon him. 

On the 24th of April, 18S9, ilr. Sandberg was 
married to Miss Sophia Johnson, who was born 
April 25, ISGl. By a former marriage he had one 
daughter, llary, whose birth occurred September 
25, 1SS6. Mr. and Mrs. Sandberg are members 
of the Swedish Lutheran church and his political 
allegiance is given to the republican party. Ho 
has never had time for secret societies nor for 
active search for oftice, preferring always to leave 
political service to others, while he has devoted 
his time and energies to the management of a 
business which in the course of years has brought 
hinr an e-\cellent financial return, making him 
one of the prosperous, prominent ami respected 
residents of Walnut and Bureau eountv. 



ANDUI-AV F. B. OI.So.X. 
Andrew F. B. Olson, deceased, was a self-made 
man. whose life record in its persistency of pur- 
pose and honorable effort, is well worthy of emula- 
tion. He was born in the south part of Sweden, 
at Christianstad, February 6, 1S32. and was 
reared upon a farm. His parents, however, were 
very poor, and he had to earn his own living. 
When only seven or eight years of age he attended 
geese and sheep, and as soon as he was old enough 
he drove a team on farm, receiving only his board 
in compf^nsafioQ for his services. Feeling that 
lie had little opportunity for advancement in his 
native land he borrowed the money from his old- 
est brother to come to America and arrived in 



I'nii.etoii on thr llih of ,hiK. IS.".;. He then 
ren.aiii.Ml a yr.ul-ul of lluivau e..unlv »[• h, tlie 
time of Ills de.ilh. Here hr ua,- lir>l employed 
liy S, S, \c\\inn at fouriee]! ilnllars per niuulh, 
and later was au employe of Amos Bacon. De- 
sirous to engaLie in faiining on his own accouru, 
he iTieiiifed an iudeljtc'dness in urder to purchase 
eighty amvs of laud, which he Iwught in ISGl. 
He worked liard, and when his unrenritting labor 
and pei'.M \eiaiii'e enabled him soon to discharge 
his llnaui iai obligation, and as the years passed, 
his linaneial resources increasing, he added to his 
property from lime to tinre until he was the owner 
of six hundred and forty acres of valuable and 
productive land. He started out empty-handed, 
and as the years passed, won a mi>st gratifying 
measure of success. He overcame all the diffi- 
culties and obstacles in his path by determina- 
tion and energy and his business integrity was 
ever unassailable. 

On the 301h of January. ISG'.', Mr. Olsor. was 
united in marriage to Miss Mary Christine John- 
son, who was born in Smaland, Sv.-eden, January 
3, 184-1, and came to Princeton in 1853, with her 
parents, XeU and In-a .lohnsuii. al<o natives of 
Sweden. Her father, who wa., a waielnnaker and 
farmer by occupation, died at the age of ninety- 
six and a half years, and her mother at the age of 
eighty-four. I'lrs. Olson was reared and educated 
in this county and still lives upon the old home- 
stead left to her by her husband. They became 
the parents of eleven children, namely: Ella H., 
who was born Xovembcr 5, 1803, was married 
Juno IG, 188.?., to Arthur C.Larrison, a merchant 
residing in Piock Island, Illinois. Xels G., a farm- 
er, who was born ^May 20, 18G4, was married 
March 12, ISHG, to Miss Mary Fletcher, of Con- 
cord, who died leaving three children, and he sub- 
sequently was married June 30, 1904, to ?Miss 
Helen Pottorf, bv- whom he has one child. Albert 
0., born June 28, ISCT, in Wyanet township, was 
married ifarch 12, 1S9G, to 5liss Kmma Nelson, 
and has two children. Edward C, born January 
20, ISTO, was married October 20, 1S92, to Miss 
Minnie Olotr.on, of Maidius township, and they 
have four children. Xettie E., born April 21, 
1872, became the wife of Henry Owens Miles, of 
Concord township, X'ovembcr 14, 1894, and died 
in January, 1901, leaving two children. Esther 
B. v., born October 8, ISTo, was married Janu- 
arv 24. 1905, to John C. Petteo. a resident farmer 
of" Wyanet township. Fredolph B., born March 
15, 187T, is farming on the old homestead, which 
property he owns. Jennie A., born ilarch 6, 
1879, is at home. Julia J., born March 28, 1882, 
wa^ married February 7. 190G, to William R. W'es- 
sell, of West Bureau, a farmer bv occupation. 
Mabe! i;.. l„,iii February 2r., IS8.\ and Xeilio 
W., born June 20, 18,^7, are both at home. 

The death of ^rr. Olson occurred June 28, 1896. 
He wa.s a member of the Swedish Lutheran 



PAST AM) J'1;KS1:.\T 01 



('orx'rv 



nil at Wyaiiet, t.. \vliicli \n. widow al>o I,.;- 
-.■?, anil he fcrvcil as a doaiMui of th.- iIiuk li 
lo at rrinreton. During tlio Ion- \Liiis nf 
residence in Bureau county lie gaiin d tliu uu- 
lificd regard and confidence of his felknvmen 
reason of an \ipright life, by well directed in- 
try, by deference for the opinions of others and 
a kindly and genial P]iirit. He was a very 
•essful farmer arid st<u k-iai-i'i-, and his jno])- 
• is still owned bv bis heir,-, to ub.-m lie left 
oiilv a goodlv eslatr, but also th,^ priceless 
ita^v' of an Tintarnislied nam.'. 



.uildings are all kept in .uood repair. He like- 
maintains an insurance agency, writing both 
:nitl lire iir-uraiiec, and for nianv years he has 
-•siuited a nnndier of the old suhstantial com- 



THOMAS JEFFFJJSOX riKllikD. 

Thomas JelTerson Fifield, acti\elv eonne.lcil 
with general farniin? at intervals tlirnngliout liis 
entire life and continuously since lS7i) and also 
conducting a life and fire insurance agency for 
many years, makes his home in Concord township. 
It was in this township, on the ]3th of Julv, ISM. 
that he began his life record, his jnirents being 
Samuel and Furcna G. (Stevens) Fifield. The 
father came to Bureau county in 1S40 and took 
up the occupation of farming here. The motlier 
arrived in this county in 1S3G and belonged to a 
family of farmers who came from New TTainiishire. 
Thus in both the paternal and maternal lines ^Ir. 
Fifield is descended from an agricultural ancestry. 
His father continued in active connection A\ith the 
farming interests of this community up to the 
time of his death, which occurred ilarch 23. 1SG9. 
He was a prominent man in In's community and 
his fellow townsmen, recognizing his worth and 
ability, called him to public office. He served as 
assessor, collector, postmaster and school director 
and in the midst of an active and useful life 
passed away at the age of fifty-two years. His 
wife long survived him and died on the 20th of 
March, 1902. In their family were nine children, 
all of whom were born in the old family residence 
UDon a farm in Concord township, and all are now 
living with the e.vception of three. 

Thomas J. F'ificld was educated in the schools 
of Buda and in Lombard College at Galesburg, Il- 
linois, where he completed his more specifically 
literary course. He then prepared for the respon- 
sibilities of a business career by a course of study 
in Eastman's Business College of Chicago, from 
which he was graduated in the year 1S70. In 
early manhood he engaged in teaching for four 
years and then entered mercantile circles at Buda, 
where he conducted a store for two years. Later 
he devoted three years to general agricultural pur- 
suits, when he again entered commercial life at 
Buda as a lumber merchant, conducting a yard 
for three years. Since 1890, however, he has re- 
sided continuously upon his farm, which ho lu'.s 
successfully conducted and he now has a good tract 
of land which he has brought under a high state 
of cultivation, the fields beine well tillc.l, whil.' 



pan 



On the 10th of iKvrnd.fr. IsM. o,,urrrd the 
marriao-o of ]»ir. Fiiicbl and :\Iiss Marv .\ii-usta 
:\Iosher, of Bu.la, a daughter of E liiah' :Moslier, a 
inei-chant of that place. The children born of this 
marriage are: May Victoria, a graduate of the 
scliools of Buda and now a student in Lombard 
College at Galesburg, Illinois; and Chester Mosher, 
who was born January 9, 1SS2, and, having grad- 
uated from the Buda schools, is now assistinj his 
father on tlic farm. 

Tlic home property comprises three huirdred and 
sixty acres, constituting one of the large and valu- 
able farms of Concord township, whereon the 
owner is successfully engaged in the raising of 
grain and stock. He and his family are members 
nf the I'nion church and are prominent in the 
community, the members of the household occu- 
pying an enviable position in social circles. ^Ir. 
I-'itiekl was equipped by good edurational training 
for a business career and, making the best po.=- 
sible use of his op})ortunities, he has advanced 
along substantial lines until he is accounted one 
of the men of aflhience in Concord town-liip with 
a record which is as creditable for its lioneslv as 
for its success. 



JOnX J. SWEEXRY. 

John J. Sweeney, filling the office of justice of 
the peace and notary public in Spring Valley, 
where he is engaged in the fire insurance and real 
estate business, claims Ireland as the land of his 
birth, his natal day being June 24, 1853. When 
two years of age he came to the I'nited States 
with his parents, who settled in Illinois. The 
early education of the son was obtained in the 
public schools of this state and he afterwards at- 
tended X"iagara L^niversity in Xew York, whoi-c 
he completed his college course. 

On leaving school he returned to La Salle coun- 
ty, where he was living at the time he went east 
to continue his studies, and following his return, 
was elected to the oiTice of town clerk of Dira- 
mick township, and subsequently township col- 
lector. He taught school in Bureau and La Salle 
counties for about fifteen years and proved an 
able educator, imparting with clearness and con- 
ciseness to others the knowledge he had acquired. 
He was also for several years identified with jour- 
nalistic interests, acting for two years as city edi- 
tor of the Ottau-a Free Trader. "lie was also re- 
porter and editor for several years of the F.a Salle 
Democrat and me La SaUe Democrat-Press. For 
a few years he resided in the northern peninsula 
of Michigan, where he al.^o engaged in the daily 
newspapiT business, and in the spring of 1892 



5CC 



PAS'j' AXD ri;i:sK.\"T of hujikat cui nty 



he came to Spring Valluy as cJiior uf tlic Spring 
Valley Senlinclj which he ediu-d for two years, 
while later he was connected witi\ newspaper work 
here in difl'ereut capacities. In 1900 he was 
elected justice of the peace for Hall township and 
has since presided over the justice court in Spring 
Valley, beiiig re-elected in 190-3. Hi, decisions 
are based upon the equity and the law in tlie case 
and are strictly fair and impartial, few of his 
opinions having ever been reversed. His course 
therefore has '"'won golden opinions from all sorts 
of people." He also acts as special correspondent 
for metropolitan papers, including leading jour- 
nals of New York, Chicago and St. Louis, and as 
above stated, is engaged in the ^ eal estate and in- 
surance busineSb, having a good ciient?.;..e in these 
linos. 

Mr. Sweeney is recognized as one of the promi- 
nent representatives of democracy in the eastern 
part of Bureau count}', and has taken a very ac- 
tive and prominent part in promoting this party's 
interests. He has served as a member of the 
Democratic County Central Committee a long 
time and at this writing is the nominee of his 
party for the office of county judge of lUireau 
county. 

On tlic ITth of April. 1S93, Mr. Sweeney was 
married to Miss Kit Cronyn and their children 
are: Lucille, born March 8, 1894; Gerald, July 
29, 1895; Helen, January 2, 1899; Cyril, June 
10, 1900; Mildred, January 5, 190-5, and James 
Allan, August 7, 1906. The parents are com- 
municants of the Catholic church and occupy a 
prominent social position in Spring Valley. Mr. 
Sweeney has a very wide acquaintance and his 
leading personal qualities are such as make him 
po]nilar wherever known. 



alb]!:kt w. bovdkx, 

Albert W. Boyden belongs to ilie little group of 
distinctively representative business men who 
have been the pioneers in inaugurating and build- 
ing up the chief business enterprises of this section 
of the country. He early had tlvj sagacity to ap- 
preciate the eminence v.-hich the future" hud in 
store for this great and growing western country 
and, acting in accordance with the dictates of his 
faith and judgment, iie has garnered, in the full- 
ness of time, the generous harvest whicli is the 
just recompense of energy, integrity and enter- 
prise. He is now connected with many extensive 
and important business interests and he makes 
his home in Sheffield, whore his operations as a 
banker, general merchant, hnnberman and grain 
dealer e.xtend to many of the thriving towns of 
thi« part of the state. 

A .«on of Dr. Wyatt and Klizaherh (Woodbury) 
Boyden, he was born in Beverly, Massachusetts, 
May 24, 183-3. His father was a practicing phy- 
sician of Beverlv and, intending that his son 



.should he a farinrr ulim he was old enough, Al- 
bert \V. Boydm was con^i-ipiently jdaei'd u])iiM a 
fanu, where he was employed during the sunmu'r 
seasons. He also acted as clerk in a bank for 
some time and received there business lessons 
which have been of value to him in his later ca- 
reer. In September, 18-53, attracted by the broad- 
er opportuuities of the new and rapidly developing 
west, he came to Illinois, clerking for a time in 
Chicago and later for the Stevens firm in Tis- 
kilwa. He then secured a farm north of Shef- 
field, on which he took up his abode, but he did 
not find agricultural life congenial to him and 
determined to concentrate his energies along other 
lines of business activity. Accordingly he removed 
to Sheffield in the fall of 18-58, and entered into 
business life, where he was destined to achieve 
success — the success which comes through close 
application, unremitting diligence and a keen in- 
sight into business possibilities and conditions. 
After clerking for three years for the firm of Seott 
& Porter, engaged in general merchandising, he 
purchased the interest of the junior partner and 
the firm style, Scott & Boyden, was then assumed. 
In 1870 ilr. Boyden sold out to the firm of Scott 
& Company imd joined H. C. Porter in a general 
merchandising and banking business. This was 
continued by the firm until October, ISTo, when 
the death of Ih: Porter occurred and on the Isi 
of January, 1S7G, through the formation of a 
new partnership, the firm name was ch.anged to 
Boyden & Dewey. These gentlemen remained in 
active business connection until 1SS9, when the 
partnership was dissolved, Mr. Dewey retaining 
the general mercantile establishment as his share 
of the business, while Mr. Boyden took charge of 
the bank with, his son, George W. Boyden, as hi- 
partner and assistant under the style of A. W . 
Boyden & Son. 

Our subject is a man of resourceful business 
ability and his far-sighted sagacity and wise coun- 
sel have proven important elements in the suc- 
cessful control of many business undertakings. 
Following the death of his former partner, ^Ir. 
Porter, he was for many years secretary and treas- 
urer of the Shefheld Mining Company. He has 
also become closely connected with mercantile, 
hnnber, grain and banking interests in the town 
of ilineral under the style of E. J. Ely &. foui- 
panv. He was for nmny years a partner oi' the 
firm" of F. D. ^\^lite & Company, of Sioux Papids. 
Iowa, and as a partner in the firm of Lindner >,^' 
Boyden he is associated with banking, the grain 
trade and elevator interests at Buda. He operates 
in Tiskilwa as a lumber merchant under the stylo 
of H. E. Curtis & Company, and as a grain dealer 
at Annawan, Illinois, with J. C. Dewey & Com- 
pany, and is also interested in the Bank of .\.nna- 
wan. He is pre-eminently one of the ?ui.lC-.-;''.i'-. 
capable and enter[)rising luisiness men of Bun.iu 
count V. 

:Mr! I'.ovden \\;'s married on the 2d of Apr:!, 



1 / 



Cl-lir/-^<^p^^ 



PAST AND I'l; 



:.\"T OF ill' 



I'OIN' 



Jo- 



iS.-.ii. to Kllun II. \\M>, who uas boni lu 
h.-aii, Maine April 18, 1837, a Jau-litei' 
icpli r.. and .Martha (We.sLon) Webb, who came 
to tlii.s Lounty in Ibol. Mrs. Boyden died July 
•>:), 1S92. T]io following children were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Boydou : George W., born January 
3, 1S58, is a partner of his father in all his enter- 
[irises and resides at Shellleld; William C. lioy- 
den, bora April 6, ISGI, is a graduate of Harvard 
College and now a member of the law firm of ]\Iatz, 
Fisher & Boyden, of Chicago; Martha F., born 
July 21, 1866, is the wife of John H. Finley, 
formerly president of Kno.x College, C4alesburg, 
Illinois, and now president of the College of the 
City of Xew York. Charles W., born July 31, 
18?"3, and educated at Harvard Collese, is hi busi- 
ness with his father at Sheflield. Albert A. B..y- 
den, born April 10, 1875, is a graduate of Har- 
vard College and one of the editors of the Ameri- 
can Magazine, Xew York city. 

In politics a prominent and pronounced repub- 
lican, Mv. Boyden has labored efl'ectively for the 
interests of his party in this section of the state. 
In 1SS4 he was nominated by the republican con- 
vention of the twenty-fifth district as candidate 
for the state legislature and was elected in No- 
vember of that year. He is an actise member 
of the Congregational chiirch, generous in its sup- 
port and manifesting a spirit of benevolence in 
his relations to the poor and needy. To him there 
has come the attainment of a distinguished posi- 
tion in connection with the business interests of 
this portion of Illinois and his efforts have been 
so discerningly directed that he seems to have 
realized the full measure of success. A man of 
distinct and forceful individuality, of broad men- 
tality and mature judgment, he has left and is 
leaving his impress upon the business world. For 
years he has been an important factor in the up- 
building of various towns of Bureau county and 
in the promotion of enterprises which add not 
alone to his individual prosperity but also ad- 
vance the general welfare and prosperity of the 
city in which he makes his home and of the vari- 
ous towns in which he has business connections. 



Dr 



JOHN c. WHITE, :ir. D. 

John C. White, president of the Bureau 



County ^ledical Society and a successful practi- 
tioner at Seatonville, was born in Coldstream, 
Scotland, May 18, 1S46, a son of John and Fran- 
ces C. (Waite) White. Dr. White was educated in 
the schools of Edinburgh and of London, Eng- 
land. He graduated from the Eoj-al College of 
Surgeons with the class of 1867 and from the 
Royal College of Physicians in the class of 1868, 
and equipped by splendid training for the onerous 
and important duties of his profession he entered 
upon tlie active work as a pliysician and surgeon, 
since whicli t'me ho has filled many important 



plates of tiu.t in the line of his profession. He 
was at one time house surgeon at Westminster 
Hosjiital, also house physician in the same insti- 
tution and junior house surgeon. He was assist- 
ant medical ollicer in the Stockwell Smallpo.x Hos- 
pital and was surgeon to her majesty's Emigra- 
tion Commissioners for India and resident med- 
ical ofllcor of the Boyal Kent Dispensary. As sur- 
geon for the emigration commissioners 'Dr. White 
traveled extensively in the East and West Indies 
and to various other parts of the world. 

Coming to the United States in 1882, he re- 
mained in Xew York city until ISSl, after which 
he spent two years in Chicago. He then removed 
to Bureau county, settling in Spring Valley, where 
he remained until Seatonville was incorporated in 
1889. Since that time he has practiced continu- 
ously in the latter place and for twenty years has 
been a resident of Hall township. He is at this 
writing, in 1906, president of the Bureau County 
Medical Society — a position which indicates the 
place which he holds in the regard of his fellow 
rnembors of the fraternity. He is likewise a mem- 
ber of the American Medical Association, the Hli- 
nois State [Medical Association and the Xorthorn 
Central Medical Society. An earnest and discrim- 
inating student, ho has carried his investigations 
far and wide in*-o tie rcaluu of medical and st.i-g- 
ical science, continually promotiui; his skill and 
efllciency through reading and study, and that he 
is one of the most jible members of the medical 
fraternity in Bureau county is indicated by his 
liberal patronage and the honors which have been 
conferred upon him by his professional brethren. 
He is medical examiner for the Illinois Life In- 
surance Company, and in addition has a large pri- 
vate practice, which is making constant deniands 
tijion his time and attention, yet loaves him oppor- 
tunity for active co-operation in those interests 
which tend to benefit his fellowmen and promote 
the welfare of town and county. 

In 1873 Dr. White was married to Miss Hannah 
I\rerrick, and they have one daughter, M'ary Fran- 
ces, who is married and resides in England. Dr. 
White takes a very deep and helpful interest in 
churcli and religious work and is a member of the 
First Congregational church of Seatonville, in 
which he is serving as deacon. He is also one of 
the board of directors of the Illinois Home Mis- 
sionary Society. A republican in politics he keeps 
informed on the questions and issues of the day 
and gives hearty co-oporatiou to those legitimate 
movements for promoting the growth and insur- 
ing the success of his party. lie is, however, op- 
posed to anything like misrule in municipal af- 
fairs and stands at all times for good government. 
He has served as justice of the peace for twelve 
years and notary public for sixteen years. 

A prominent ^^fason. he became a member of 
Dolhousie lodge. No. SGO, A. F. .<;- A. ^f., in Lon- 
don, Pmgland, and on the 11th of May, 1873, in 
London, he was presented with a testimonial by a 



57 () 



PAST AM) ]'Jil 



;\T OF I'.L'li 



L'OIXJ'V 



comiiiittoe of the JIuyal .Masonic Jlistituto fnv 
Girls iu recognition of his services u.s steward at 
the cighty-se\eiith aiiiiiversarv f('riti\al, at which 
seven thousand two hundred aiul sixty-nine ]iounds 
sterling were raised for the institute. The lord 
mayor, lit. Hon. David Henry IStone, occupied 
the chair on the occasion of the presentation and 
the Doctor prizes highly the beautiful illuminated 
address uhich he then received. Ho joined the 
Odd Fellows society in London in 1874.. and be- 
came a mendier of Slieridan lodge, Xo. 198, K. P., 
in Spring "\'alley. He was the first chancellor 
comnmnder of the lodge and served for two terms. 
He afterward assisted in founding the Knights of 
Pythias lodge at Ladd and also Harrison lodge, 
Xo. 403, K. P., at Seatonvillc, and is sci'ving for 
his fourteenth term as keeper of the records and 
seals. He has been for seventeen years surgeon 
and assistant surgeon for the Third liegiment of 
the uniformed rank of the Knights of Pythias of 
Illinois. It will be seen that Dr. White is a man 
of well grounded character, not so abnormally de- 
veloped in any one direction as to become a genius, 
but with his native talents and energies exercised 
to their full strength, with the result that his life 
has been of benefit to his fellowmen, his activities 
touching many lines of general intei'cst and at the 
same time proving a source of individual profit. 
He has done effective work in fraternal and church 
circles and is the loved family physician in many 
a household in Hall town^-hip. 



M. J. GKEKXKi;. 
M. J. Greener is the owner of one of the miulel 
farms of Bureau county and a prominent repre- 
sentative of stock-raising interests. He has, more- 
over, been a leader in those lines of activity af- 
fecting the general interests of society, and has 
co-operated in many movements for political, in- 
tellectual and moral progress. He lives near 
Seatonvillc, and is nundjcred among the native 
sons of Bureau county, his birth having occurred 
in Selby township, December 20, 1848. His 
father, J. G. Greener, was born in Byron, Ger- 
many, and when twenty-five years of age came to 
the United States, attracted by the broader busi- 
ness opportunities of the new world. He ar- 
rived in this county iu 1S3G and cast in his lot 
with the early pioneer settlers. For numy years 
thereafter he engaged in farming, which pursuit 
he made his life work. In politics he was a re- 
publican, and was a man most highly respected 
by all who knew him. His life was so upright and 
honorable that he was known to all his neiglibors 
as 'lionest John." He died in the year 1893, 
leaving a comfortable competence and an untar- 
nished name as the result of a life of activity and 
business integrity. His vrife bore the maiden 
name of Marilla Jaue Savage, and was born in 
Putnam county, Illinois. 



M. .]. Gr.vnrr pui>urd lu.> cducaH,,n in il,,. 
schunls nf i;,nvau .■onmv, and ulie,, 1„. ,,„i 
aside liis l.'Xt-l.ooks became clliiecled with ih,. 
saddlery buMUess hi IloliowayviUe. wjiere be re- 
mained in active trade for eighte'cu years. in 
1S93 he purchased a farm ou section Ls, Hull 
townsliip, consisting of eighty acres of laud, in 
which he afterward added eighty acres on secti..'i 
T. He has made it a model farm, on which he 
has a fine residence and other buildings. It is 
supplied with all modern equipments and is in- 
deed a valuable property, constituting one of the 
attractive features of the landscape. In addition 
to the cultivation of the fiehls he is likewise rais- 
ing fine stock, making a speeialtv of Durham 
cattle and Poland Gliiua lie;-.-. He is a member 
of a stock company owning a vei-} \aliinlple im- 
ported French staUioii. He is also well known 
as a raiser of fine poultry, and he has much fi'uii 
upon his place. In fact, there is no better im- 
proved farm in the county, and its impro\emeni,- 
are all in keepinif with the most progn-ssiM.' spirit 
of the age. 

In lS7o 'Mr. Greener was united in maiiia-e^ le 
Miss Emma Hassler, a daughter of Charles lia.---- 
ler, an old resident of Bureau county. In tlie 
family were nine children, but two of ilie numbei- 
are now deceased — Emma, who died at tlie agi' 
of nine years, and a son who died in infaiiey. The 
seven still living are Charles, Frederick, Han-\. 
Lena, Clark, :\I. J.. Jr., and Hattie. 

Mr. Greener is a member of Bureau Counn 
lodtre, Xo. IVi, A. F. & A. M., and PrineeU.m 
chapter, P. A. M., and is thoroughly in .sym- 
pathy with the teachings and tenets ot the craft. 
In j]olitics he has been a life-long republican, and 
has taken a deep interest in the welfare of the 
county, to the extent of giving hearty co-opera- 
tion to every movement which ho deems will prose 
of public benefit. He has been a delegate to many 
county conventions and is an earnest champion of 
republican principles, although not an ollici'- 
seeker. He holds membership in the Congrega- 
tional church, in the work of which he takes an 
active and helpful part. He has served as deae-ou 
and has always devoted much of his time ami eii- 
ergy to church and Sunday-school work. He is 
thus interested in the material, political, social 
and moral progress of his community, and hi.- 
influence is ever on the side of right, improve- 
ment and progress. 



SIXO E. WIXSEK. 
Sino E. Winser, a representative agriculturi-t 
of Hall township, whose farm of four bundrc' 
and sixty acres is a model projjcrty, was born m 
tliis township, June 19. 1849. Hi.s father. Jame- 
Winser, was a native of Ha-.skhurst, Kent coun'y. 
England, born August 24, ISIG. The patrrna' 




^ux. AXi> Mi;s. M. .1. (;i;kf-:\'ki 



PAST AND rilESJ'^AT OF BUiiEAL' COLLXTY 



573 



grandfather, Edward Wiiiscr, was also a native of 
the same locality and at one time was a resident 
of J'.ureau county, Illinois, hut spent his last daj-s 
in Henry eoiinly, this state. James Winser left 
England" on the ISth of September, ISil, and 
made his way direct to Bureau county. lie worked 
for Itobert Scott and others for several years and 
then removed to Lvingston county, Illinois, where 
lived his brother-in-law. There Mr. Winser lo- 
cated a claim but afterward returned to Bureau 
county and purchased land on section 30, Hall 
township, on which he took up his abode in 1850. 
As the years passed he became a successful and 
prosperous farmer and stock-raiser and the home 
farm of four hundred and sixty acres was a model 
one, equipped with modern conveniences and pro- 
ducinc; fine'erops as a result of the care and labor 
bestowed upon the fields. In 1872 James Win- 
ser returned to his native country, making the trip 
in twelve days, altlioughvvhen he first crossed the 
Atlantic it required six weeks to complete the 
voyage. On the 12th of August, 1848, he was 
married to Miss Serena Munson, who was born on 
the 19th of September, 1S32, in Warren county, 
Indiana, a daughter of Sino and Sarah (Fenton) 
Munson, the former a native of New York, and 
the latter of Ohio. Unto Mr. and Mrs. James 
Winser were born four children : Sino E., Will- 
iam B., Mrs. Nancy I. Campbell and i\Irs. Isabel 
S. Miller. 

Sino E. Winser, born in Hall township, spent 
his boyhood and youth in his parents' home and 
pursued his educatiou in the public schools. He 
early became familiar with the duties and labors 
that fall to the lot of the agriculturist and has al- 
ways carried on general farming, having now a 
good tract of land in Hall township, which he has 
brought under a high state of cultivation. His 
polit~ical allegiance is given to the democratic 
party, of which his fatner was also a stalwart ad- 
vocate. 



ANDREW CARPEK. 
Andrew Carper is the owner of an excellent 
farm property comprising three hundred and ele- 
ven acres of well improved land in Macon town- 
ship, and his success in his business career is at- 
tributable entirely to his own labors. Iforcovcr 
he is entitled to representation in this volume as 
one of the veterans of the Civil war. for he de- 
fended his country in the darkest hour of her his- 
tory. His birth occurred in Bedford countv, 
Pennsylvania, October 17, 1812, and his education 
was afforded by the public schools. His parents 
were Philip and Elizabeth (Bassler) Carper, the 
former a native of Lebanon county, I'cnnsylvania, 
born December 4, 1814, while the latter was horn 
in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, Scptembc- 17, 
1824. The father was a son of Sanuiol Carper, 
who was of German parentage and was born in 
Virginia. He died, however, in Bedford county, 
Pennsvlvania, Aueust 3, 1801, at the age of 



eighty-three years, two months and twenty-seveu 
days. His wife, Jlrs. Christina Carper, wlio was 
born in Lebanon county, I'encsylvania, died in 
1SC4 at the age of eighty }ears, ten montlis and 
twenty-three days. 

Philip Carper was reared to the occupation of 
farming and always followed that pursuit as a 
life work. He was married in Bedford county, 
Pennsylvania, to Miss Elizabeth Bassler, who died 
September 25, 1815, leaving three children: Eliza, 
who was born November 8, 1840, and 'became the 
wife of John Burke, while on the 6th of May, 
1901, her death occurred; Andrew, of this review; 
and Samuel B., who is living in Macon township. 
After losing his lirst wife the father married Han- 
nah Emerson, who was born in Bedford county, 
Pennsylvania, February 4, 1808, and died April 2, 
1900. For a number of years after attaining his 
majority Philip Carper continued to reside in the 
Keystone state and in the spring of 1852 emi- 
grated westward to Fulton county, Illinois, where 
he resided until the spring of 1853. He then re- 
moved to Concord township, Bureau county and 
in 1854 removed to Macon township, where he 
followed farming, and in 1855 he purchased one 
hundred and thirty-seven acres of land on wliich 
was a log cabin. Subsequently he erected thereon 
a frame residence which now stands as the handi- 
work of one of the pioneer settlers of the county. 
He first bought military land and he had at one 
time two hundred and ninety-seven acres. His 
life was devoted to general agricultural pursuits 
and through his intense and well directed activity 
he gained a goodly measure of success. His early 
political allegiance was given to the whig party 
and after its dissolution he became a stanch re- 
publican. He was a member of the Brethren 
church and also assisted in sujiporting the Church 
of God. He passed away in Macon township, 
February 23, 1804, after a long residence in tliis 
county, during which time he won a place among 
the leading, substantial and honored [lioneer resi- 
dents. 

Andrew Carper, whose name introduces this 
review, was a lad of ten years when he came with 
his parents to Illinois and he remained, with them 
until twenty-one years of age, assisting in the ar- 
duous task of developing a new farm. He then 
began fanning on his own account, first buying 
eighty acres of land, while later he added a tract 
of forty acres. Eventually, however, he sold that 
property and bought one hundred and sixty acres, 
which he cultivated and improved for some time. 
At length he sold his second farm and bought 
one hundred and ninety-nine acres where he now 
resides. He has added to his land as opportunity 
has offered and as his financial resources have per- 
mitted until he is now the owner of three hun- 
dred and eleven acres, constituting a well im- 
proved and valuable farm. He is engaged in gen- 
eral fanning and stock-raising. Practically th.e 
only interruption to his business career was dur- 
ing the period of the Civil war. when in response 



iTi 



PAST AM 



ri;i 



;nt ok iUKKvr col-xty 



to the country s .iill lu; enlist, ■,! „ii the ,stli ot 
September, ISG-l, as a inrml"i- <>f (Jii(ii|i;!ii\ II, 
One Iluudrcd and Fui tv---iMli IUiiion \u\mdrrc 
Infantry, at Bunker llill. Illiiini-. }I,. N\a,> mus- 
tered in at Peoria, thence went to Sprinj;lield and 
was afterward ordered to Quincy, where lie did 
provost duty until the time of President Lin- 
coln's assassination, wlien he was ordered to 
Springfield, the regiment being in line at Lincoln's 
funcial. lie was mustered out in the capital citv. 
July S, ISCo. 

In 1876 -Mr. Carper was married to Miss Sarah 
Wilds, who ';\as born Mareh 2?, 1S.;>.:., and died 
March 23, 1S9G. Thev were the parents of seven 
children: William A., born October 22, ISTT; 
Charles A., who was born August 29, 1879, and 
died-.iLirch 22, 1SS3 : Philip Thompson, born No- 
vember 30, 18S1; JIabel A., January 24, lS8i; 
Benjamin F.. July 22, 18SC : Edward, Decemlicr 
29, 1S8S; and Forrest, June 20, 1892. For his 
second wife Mr. Carper chose Sarah H. Stratton, 
who first married Archie Mead and following his 
death she became the wife of ^Mr. Carper on the 
3d of June, 189G. She was born October 20, 1SG3, 
a daughter of Edward and Caroline (Itobins) 
Stratton. Her father was born in Oliio and died 
in 1904, at the age of seventy-five years, while his 
wife, a native of Xew Jersey, is now living in 
Buda at the age of seventy-three years. Unto 
Mr. and ^frs. Carper were born three childi-,.n: 
Frederick P., born Julv 7, 1897; John L., April 
17, 1898; and Muriel E., July 20, 1900. 

Politically Mr. Carper is a stalwart republican, 
thoroughly in symjiathy with the principles of the 
party, yet not an office seeker. Fraternally he is 
connected with the Modern Woodmen of America. 
In his boyhood ^Ir. Carper was very f^nd of hunt- 
ing and had ample 0|ipnrtunity to indulg'' his 
love of that sport, for there was miuh wild game 
in the county, including deer, prairie eiiickens 
and wild turkeys. In the spring his father would 
send him out with a gun to drive oil: wild brant 
and geese which were feeding on the fields of grain. 
He has for many years witnessed the changes tiiat 
have occurred here, the transformation that has 
taken place and the substantial gnAvtli and im- 
provement of th<' rnuiit\ ami as the vrir.- luive 
passed he has h;vv.r his full .-^liaie in the work oF 
substantial inii.mwnent ;:ml de'.elu|in;( nt. r^^i^'- 
ciallv alono- aL-rinilturp.! lines. 



h.\i;!;y t'. p.ah.ev. 

Harry I". Kailey, edil,.r and nun-r t the F.u- 
reau County L'epubliean, ua~ lioin Filu-uary 1, 
1809, in Princeton, liis jiareiit^ i.ciiiu Mr. and Mrs. 
J. W. Bailey. He attended the jiublie schools and 
the- high school in Princeton and. also took a 
course in a commercial school in Quiney. ifr. 
Bailey has always given his time to newspaper 
work and has never i)een otb._'rwi~e engaged. Upon 
leaving school lie comnii'nfed uork in the olTice of 



til.' J.'cpuiilh.in, tlien owned Ijy liis fattier ;,nd 
Cliailo ]'. I'i;i> ■•im, under the firm name of ];aii.-v 
i\. I'la-cun. Jle commenced at the bottom of the 
mecliaiiical department and in a few vears was in 
charge of that departuirnt. With a desire to fcr- 
ther prepare himself for the w.uk of editing ;, 
newsjiaper he went to Liwa and [lurehascd a coiinlv 
seat ni'w.-paiMT and a few years later sold the [lapjr 
ami went to Chieagd for c\[)crience in the editorial 
department of a daily uews[iaper and there for 
nearly two years he was employed by the city 
editor of the Chicago Tribune. It was on the 
7th of October, 1889, that Mr. Bailev went to 
Iowa, and at that ime he purchased a half inter- 
est in the Cerro Gordo County Tlepublieau, jmb- 
lishcd at ilason City, and three months later his 
brother William J.' Bailey, then publishing the 
Gazette at Spring Valley, Illinois, sold his ]iaper 
at the latter place and purcluised the otlicr half 
interest of the Cerro Gordo County Pepublican. 
In ^larch, 189U, they commenced the business of 
publishing ready prints for country weekly papcrs 
undor tlie name of the Mason City Xewspai)er 
Company and in this venture they were very siie- 
cessful. In January, 1893, they sold the business 
of the newspaper company to the Western Union 
Xewspaper Company, which company purchased 
the lii<iness in behalf of the other comiianies iu- 
tere>ti.d in the ready print business. 

While residing at ]\rason City :\rr. Bailey was 
married on the 19th of Xovcmber. 1891, to ^i;- 
Jennie E. Colver, daughter of IMr. and Mrs. J. 11. 
Colver, of Ladd, Illinois. In Xovcmber, IS:''.', 
ilr. Bailey and his brother sold the Cerro Gord^i 
County Eepublieau and the following year re- 
moved to Chicago, where he commenced his work 
with tlie Chicago Tribune. In ifay, 1894, Mr. 
Bailey came to Princeton and estaljlished a bunfau 
for reporting current news for several counties b.r 
rl:c ('liiiago daily paners. On July 22, 1S9G, oe- 
curivl the death of Charles P. Bascom, and on 
the 5th of September following Mr. Bailey pui- 
chased from his estate hi.- inteiest in the Bureau 
County Republican, and engaged in the publica- 
tion of the paper in partnership with his father, 
under the name of Bailey v<' Son. This partner- 
ship continued until the death of his father on 
.May 22, 1903, and shortly after he purcba.sed f.oni 
the' estate his father's interest in the paper and 
since that time has been conducting the busine— 
him.self. His father publksbed the paper for ■-• 
[)eriod of forty years and previous to that time 
was in the newspaper business in Ohio. Both hi- 
father and his grandfather made their life's work 
the publishing of newspapers and were never en- 
gaged in any other business. Mr. Bailey is a trus- 
tee of the Methodist Episcopal church, a diree'cr 
of the Citizens' Xational bank and a member et 
the I'rineeton city council. The standing of Ihc 
Kepubliean is well known in Princeton and liu- 
reau coiintv and the long experience of ^fr. Bi l-y 
in the new'si.aper field ciualifies him for the infer- 



PAS']' A.\j) j'i;i':sHX'j' OF iui;iv\u colwj'v. 



(■:;ts which now c 
WL'll worlhy the 
coivf.s in both th. 
i;;irtnK'ntp. 



liis iittcution. 
jial iiatroiia,L;i' 



Wll.SOX W. DKATi;!;. 

Wilson W. Jlrap.T i. eii^.i-r,l ,„ tlir c.ii.Ui. t of 
a livorv businrsd in Walnut, whnv ho has nia.h' 
ins home sinee 1903. He wa- horn in ( iieeiiville 
township, this county, Augnsi \->, issii, and, liav- 
in.g .spent his entire life in this part ol' the state, 
is therefore well known to a large number of its 
citizens. His parents were Dennis D. and Viola 
T. (Wilson) Draper. The father was i)orn July 
x'-l, 1850, in Greenville township, which fact indi- 
cates that th^ Drapers are among the pioneer fami- 
lies of the county. His wife's birth occurred Sep- 
tember 19, 1S5-J." 

Wilson W. Jiraper at the u.-ual a-r hogan his 
education in the district srhools near his father's 
home and therein mastered the branches of learn- 
ing which qualified him for life's practical and 
responsible duties. Ho was reared to farm life 
and no event of special importance occurred dur- 
ing the days of his boyhood and youth to vary for 
him the routine of a rural existence. His time was 
divided between the duties of the schoolroom, the 
pleasures of the playgrouml and the -work of the 
fields. After attaining man's estate, however, he 
determined to follow some other pursuit than that 
of agriculture and, removing to Walnut in 1903 
when twenty-three years of age, he established a 
livery barn, which he is now conducting. He has 
a first class stable, in which he keeps a number of 
good horses and some fine velucles. anil his earnest 
desire to please his ]iatn>iis Ims been our of the 
salient features in the very gratifyiu- suoies; 
which Iws attended him in his busiiU'.-s alfairs. 

On the 30th of March, 1904, occurred the mar- 
riage of Mr. Draper and Miss Vorna T.. .T..hn.on. 
who was born IMay 7. 18S3, in this county. Thcv 
are i)oth members of the JNIystic Workers of the 
World and of the Uoyal Xeighbors of America, the 
latter being the ladies' au.\iliary of the Mou'TIi 
Woodmen, with which ^Ir. Draper is identified, 
his membership being in canrp Xo. 17. His polit- 
ical allegiance is given to tlic republican party. .V 
young man, energetic and enteriirising, his clo-o 
n))plication to his business, combinod with hi- in- 
dustry, has resulted in a rrratifvini;- sucecss. 



A. 



A. L. sti:kij;. 

I.. Steele, now living retinal front active 
business, his home being at X^o. '220, West South 
street in Princeton, was born in Erie countv. X'ew 
York, near Buffalo, on the Sth of :\rarch', 1827. 
His parents, Danford and Lydia (Abel) Steele, 
were natives of Williamstown, Yennont. and went 
to the state of New York in 1S2G, settling in Erie 



county. The father \\as a cariicnter by trade and 
died whon onlv tbirt\-thive vears of' age. The 
mother arteruard can,,' to Illinois, where she re- 
sided until her death, which occurred in ISGl, 
when she was si.vty years of age. Both the Sleeles 
and Abels were ofd families of X'ew England and 
were of Scotch-Irish descent. Unto itr. and Mrs. 
Danford Steele were born three children: Henry 
D., who is now residing in Denver, Colorado; A. 
L., of this review ; and Leonore, who died in Do- 
ver, this county, in ]S,"il. 

A. L. Steele was reared in the .-tate of his nativ- 
ity and was a young man of twenty-one years w hen 
he came to Illinois in IS-IS, settling at Dover, Bu- 
reau county, where he worked at farm labor until 
1850. Then on airoiint of poor health he entered 
a store in ])()\>i-. whrif he was em]ilo\ed until 
1859. He atterward engaged in business on liis 
own account in connection with C. D. Hubbard, 
proprietor of a general store at Dover, which they 
conducted under the firm name of Steele & Hub- 
bard. Each partner invested five hundred dollars 
and they incurred an indebtedness of ?ix thou- 
sand dollars in order to stock their store, but this 
was entirely discharged within four years. Dur- 
ing his long business career ilr. Steele never sued 
a man nor sent a statement if within a day's ride 
of a debtor. He was always, however, a good col- 
lector and A\-as equally prompt in discharging ev- 
ery financial obligation. Men who had business 
relations with him trusted liiin and on no occa- 
sion did he ever betray in the slightest degree the 
trust reposed in him. After a partnership of four 
years Mr. Steele purchased ^Ir. Hubbard's interest 
and continued the business until 189,2, when he 
sold his projicrty and dis])osed of his stock. He 
then purchased land in southwestern Minnesota 
and also erected his jiresent comfortaljle residence 
in Princeton. The years have brought him suc- 
cess as a reward of his earnest, persistent labor, 
careful nuiuagetnent and keen business discrimi- 
nation and with a handsome competence he retircil 
to private life to enjoy in well earned re.-t the 
fruits of his former toil. 

On the 28tli of Xovember, 1852, was celebrated 
the marriage of A. L. Steele and iliss Susan Zear- 
ing, the wedding ceremony being performed in 
I)o\er. She was born in Cumberland county, 
Pennsylvania, April 2, 1829, a daughter of JIarlin 
ami Sarah (Shafer) Zeariug, who were natives of 
Penn^ylvania and were of German and Swiss de- 
scent. They liecamo pioneer residents of Bureau 
countv in 183t> and soon afterward located on a 
farm in I'.orliii, whii-li is now the projierty of David 
S. Zcarin,-. Tiny cniitinued to reside in Berlin 
until called finiii till- life, the father dying in 
.Tulv. Ls.")."). at the age of si.xty-onc years, while 
his'wife survived until 18G9 and pas.sed away at 
til" ag'' of seventy-three years. Mrs. Steele was the 
sixth child in a family of twelve children, of whom 
two daughri-rs ami four sons arc livinsf, namelv: 
Martin P., a resident of Princeton: Louis, who 



PAST AND IMiKSKXT OF llUl;i;AU COLXTi. 



lives in Ladd, this county; David S., of Piinee- 
ton; John JI., of De Kalb county, jMissouri ; and 
Mrs. Sarah Foster, of Chicago. 

■The marriage of Mr. and Jlrs. Steele ha.s been 
blessed with si.\ sons: Charles D., who is at the 
head of the collection department of Swift & Com- 
pany, in Chicago; George, a resident farmer of 
Dover township; John A., who is engaged in the 
hardware and grocery biijiucss in Gunnison, Colo- 
rado; Dick, who is in the office of the secretary of 
state in Springfield, Illinois; Louis L., who is en- 
gaged in the hardware business in Galesburg; and 
Dr. H. D. Steele, of Princeton, who is mentioned 
elsewhere in this volume. There were also three 
daughters in the family but two died in infancy, 
whils Lottie Ij., who became the wife of William 
J. Bailey, of Chicago, died August 13, 1890, ot 
the age of twenty-three years. Mr. and ilrs. 
Steele celebrated their golden wedding anniversary 
four years ago — a most delightful occasion, which 
was participated in by many friends. 

Politically Mr. Steele is a republican and al- 
though never an office holder oi- an aspirant for 
political honors he has always taken an active in- 
terest in politics, realizing the oldigations as well 
as the privileges of citizenship and doing all in 
his power to secure the adoption of the principles 
which he deems most conducive to good govern- 
ment. In 1855 he became a member of the Odd 
Fello^\s society and was secretary of the local 
lodge for many years, but withdrew from the or- 
der about six years ago. Mrs. Steele has been a 
member of the Baptist church for the past fifty- 
five 3-ears and they are a most highly esteemed 
couple of Princeton, their circle of friends being 
almost co-extensive with the circle of their ac- 
quaintance, while in many incidents they have 
gained the warmest personal regard of those with 
whom they hav; been associated by reason of their 
possession' of sterling traits of character, ilr. 
Steele figured for many years as a prominent, 
leading and successful business man of Bureau 
county and although he started oat in life in a 
very humble capacity he worked his way steadily 
upward and his history is another illustration of 
that fact that labor finds its sure reward and that 
the record which the American people hold in 
highest regard is that of the self-made man. 



WHJJAM HASSLFK. 

William Hasshn-, who is engaged in general 
farming in ]'>erlin township, was born in 15ureau 
countv, April 11, 18G7. and is the eldest son of 
Jacob and Elizabeth (Lintz) LLassler. The 
father was also a native of this country, while the 
mother's birth occurred in Germany and from that 
country she came to America when a little maiden 
of seven summers. Establishing their homo in 
Bureau county, their son, William Tlassler, was 
reared upon the old homestead farm and early 



became familiar with the duties and laburs thai 
fall to the lot of the agriculturist, lie worked 
in the fields through the summer montlis and in 
the winter seasons attended the public school.<. 
Having arrived at years of maturity he chose m 
a companion and helpmate for life's journey Mi.-;s 
Maggie Piper, whom he wedded on the 4th of 
September, 189-1. She was born January 1:;, 
18G1, a daughter of Hiram H. Piper. Unto this 
marriage two cliildren were born but are now 
deceased. 

ilr. Ilassler is a democrat in his political vieu- 
and stanchly advocates the principles of the 
party, while his religious faith is indicated by hij 
membership in the German Lutheran church. He 
manages one hundred and sixty acres of choice 
land and promises to bo one of the leading farmer.s 
of the county. He also owns eighty acres on sec- 
tion G, Hall township, inherited from his father. 
If honesty, thrift and push will accomplish re- 
sults Mr- Hassler, with the start that he has al- 
ready made, will make a success. He has ali-cady 
made a creditable record, owing his success en- 
tirely to his pcrscrverance and energy and his life 
thus far illustrates what may be accomplished 
through the exercise of those qualities which liave 
long been recognized as essential factors to pros- 
perity. 



EDWITn ch.\pm.vx studley. 

Edwin Chapman Studlcy, wdio is engaged in 
general farming in Mineral township, wdiere he 
owns and operates three hundred and fort3--four 
acres of ricli land, annually gathering therefrom 
good crops, is a native son of the township in 
wdiich he still resides, having there first opened his 
eyes to the light of day on the Slth of :\Iarch, 
1861. He is a son of Christopher C. Studlcy, a 
retired farmer residing in Neponset, wlio owns 
in this county a valuable farming property. He 
represents one of the pioneer families of Illinois, 
his grandparents, William and Ann (Chapman) 
Studlcy, having located in that part of Morgan 
county which is now included in Scott county, 
Illinois, at a very early day, while Chrislopher 
C. Studley became one of the first settlers of 
Xepojiset township. Extended mention is made 
of the father on another page of this work. 

To the common school system of the county Ed- 
win Chapman Studley is indebted for the educa- 
tional advantages he received. He was reared 
ujion the home farm and in his youth remaintd 
with his father, afterward renting part of his 
father's land for a number of years. He has al- 
ways followed the occupation of farming and In? 
early practical experience in the fields wollquai'- 
fird him to tal:e up agricultural work on his o\\j'- 
account after he had attained his majority. II''' 
continued to rent land from his father for some 
time and carefully saving his earnings was at 
length enabled to "purchase property for him.-Lu 



/^ 



\ 



X •'■^ 



\ V. 






W'LLIAM HASSLlP 



hR5 WiLLiAn HaSSL 



FAS'J' AXlJ l'\ 



;k.\t or iJUKKAU c 



NTV 



oSI 



anil to his original iKililin-i ho has aJ.lcil from 
time to time until he is now tlie owner of three 
huiidied and forty-four acres of good land in 
Mineral township, constituting an excellent farm 
because of the juany improvements -vhich have 
been placed upon it and the highly cultivated con- 
dition of the fields. He also owns one hundred 
and sixty acres of land in South Dakota. 

:Mr. Studley was united in marriage to Miss 
Etta Elizabeth Kiley, the wedding being celebrated 
on the 1st of January, 18S3. Siie is a daughter 
of Oliver Perry Eilcy, a farmer and a representa- 
tive of an old family of Mineral township. Mr. 
and Mrs. Studlev have become the parents of 
four children: Abbie Blanche, Grace, Ethel Oliver 
and Christopher Edwin, the last named born 
N'oveuibcr 217 1S9S. 

Both Mr. and ilrs. Studley have the warm re- 
gard of many friends in their locality, being held 
in high esteem by all who know them. He has 
served as school director for the past nineteen 
years and his labors have been far-reaching and 
"beneficial in behalf of public education. He has 
also been road commissioner for five years and 
believes in good highways and in progress along 
various lines residting in benefit to the general 
community. In his business life he has displayed 
unfaltering jierseverance and diligence and, more- 
over, is found thoroughly reliable in all trade 
transactions, so that his success is worthily won 
and justly merited. 



GEOIJGE KACKT.EY. 
George Backley, of Maiden, was born in Orange 
county, Vermont, in 1821, and came to Bureau 
count}', Illinois, with his parents in 1S3G, where 
he lived until his death on Xoveuiber 3, 1906. 
George Eackley was a man who would give char- 
acter and stability to any comniuDity. In his ac- 
tive years he took part in all the public enter- 
prises of the county, was for many years super- 
visor of Berlin township and for six years chair- 
man of the board. He majle no display of his 
talents, but when the time came to act ho was 
found ready to sustain his honest convictimis. 
both by his voice and his vote. Deceit and in- 
trigue were foreign to his nature. He had an 
opinion iipou the question of public polic} ami 
was ready to express it at the proper time aiul 
place. The writer has known him for more than 
thirty years and during that time has seen him 
called to decide upon many ciuestions of contro- 
versy and never did he know him to hesitate or 
hold back his opinion for the sake of policy, 
but like a strong and just man he decided for the 
riirht as he saw it. It brings a pang of sorrow 
to us to kTiow that his useful life is ended. One 
after another of the noldc men and womr'ii v\ho 
have helped to make this county and stair what 
it is are passing away ami all tha 



laid auav uii.l.r tl.r cold clods ,<( ih- vallcv 
and hillside. Yes, they rest from th..-ir labors, but 
their works follov>' tliem. For nearh' seveiuv years 
]Mr. liackley was a citizen of this county and now 
in this year, 190G, just as the blighting frosts 
of autumn are covering the ground with nature's 
decay the summons come and that familiar form 
tliat has stood like the giant oak for so many years 
3 ields to the common lot of all the goneratinns and 
m.w slcej.s in the silent city of the dead. 



orial 



LAWso.x (Tirris iiouGirrox. 

Lawson Curtis Houghton, giving his time and 
attention to his farming interests and the raising 
of horses, makes his home in SV.etfield and is 
classed with tlie men whoso industry and keen 
iliscrimination form the basic element in their 
success. Born in Windham county, Vermont, on 
the 22d of October, ISGl, lie is a son of I!ufus 
Henry and Martlia (Wilcox) HouErhion. the form- 
er a farmer by occupation. The Houghton family 
in Bureau county has also been represciiied by 
Horatio Xelson Houghton, who came to Illinois 
from Vermont in ISG-j and here engaged in busi- 
ness extensively and successfully. He loaned 
money to the farmers of Bureau county and in his 
dealings was always just and relial^le. He often 
assisted them in such a way as to enable them to 
secure a clear title to their farm by the timely as- 
sistance which he gave them in making loans which 
were repaid upon easy terms. His advice and 
counsel often jir'^ved a beneficial element, for he 
was sound in his judgments and was always will- 
ing to assist others in this way. While conduct- 
ing his business interests he also availed himself 
of the opportunities offered for judicious invest- 
ment and became the owner of more than one 
thousand aces of valuable land. He also had 
many other business interests and at one time — 
jirior to the Civil war— was extensively engaged 
in the ice business in ;\[emphis, Tennessee. At 
his old home in Halifax, Vermont, he served as a 
selectman during the period of the war. He died 
.January 31, ISOG. 

Lawson C. Houghton acquired h's educ;\iion in 
the public schools of his native counry and engaged 
in farming with his father, gainin- practical ex- 
perience in asricultural pursuits through the act- 
ive assistance which he rendered on the hoir.'» farm. 
He came to ShetTield in 1S90 and opened an imple- 
ment and lumber business which he conducted un- 
til 1S93, since which time he has devoted his at- 
tention to his farm, whereon he raisis horses, cat- 
tle, hogs and sheep, being one of the leading stock- 
raisers' of his part of the county. He is also en- 
gaged in making invcstnieiiis in lands, which is 
proving an important and profitable branch of his 
Infill. >.. and he has large landed interest in Illi- 
nois, also sixteen hundred acres in Kan-as. one 
hundi-rd and sixtv aires in Minnesr.ia, and a simi- 
lar amount in Nebraska. 



582 



I'AST A\D ri;i:si;x'r of i;r 



AT corxTv. 



ilr. Houghton was uiiitL'd iu niarriaj;e to ^Miss 
Mary E. Vaxigliii, a daughter of John and Frau- 
ees Vauglm, of Windham county, Vermont, tlio 
wedding being celt'hrated in June, ISSG. They 
now have three cluklreu: >;cl,~on Vaughn, ].o\v- 
ell Curtis and William Keunetli. 

In his political views ;Mr. Houghton is a re- 
publican and has served as councilman of Shef- 
field, while in all community aifairs he is deejjly 
interested. The extent of his business interests 
makes him a leading resident of Sheffield and his 
keen discrimination and unfaltering enterprise 
constitute the foundation ujion which he has 
builded his success. 



CI.PLMEXT HAIIRIXGI'OX. 

The agricultural interests of Bureau county in 
former years found a worthy representative in 
Clement Harrington, who engaged in farming in 
Bureau township, where he now, iu the enjoy- 
ment of the fruits of his former toil, is living 
retired in a pleasant home at Xo. 224 South 
Church street, Princeton. His birth occurred in 
Bureau township, September S, 1858, and he rep- 
resents one of the old families of this county. 

His paternal grandparents were Jonathan and 
Lydia (Anderson) Harrington, both, natives of 
Kent county, Delaware, the former bnm in 
jSTovernber, 179-1, and the latter in Xnvcnihor, 
ISOT. In their family were four ,-ons and four 
daughters, including Xathan A. Harrington, now 
of Wyanet, Illinois, who was born in Farmington, 
Kent county, Delaware, October 19. 1831. He 
was reared to farm life and for many years de- 
voted his time and energies to the tilling of th.e 
soil. The year IS.j.") witnessed his arrival in Bu- 
reau county and he worked out by the month on 
a farm in the summer seasons while in the winter 
he taught school for several years, being one of 
the capable early educators of the county. In 
1800 he made investment in eighty acres of land 
and began life for himself on a farm, where he 
carried on general agricultural ymrsuits and =tock- 
raising- and also fed stock to a considerable extent. 
He has added to the eighty acres he first purchased 
until he now owns eight hundred and fifty-three 
acres of good land in Bureau township, bccoiniiig 
one of the extensive landowners of this county. 
His life .should serve as a source of emulation 
and inspiration to others, showing what may be 
accomplished through determined purpose and un- 
faltering energy when guided bv soutnl judgtiu-ut. 
He lived upon his farm until 1891, when he en- 
tered upon a well earned rest and removed to 
Wyanet. where he owns a beautiful home on M;iin 
street, his farm, which he rents, briu>;in-- t.i h'wn 
an excellent income. His political allegiance i- 
given to the men and me:isures of the republican 
party and he has served in nearly all of the town- 
ship olTices, liaving been supervisor for throe 



\eais, luwn.-hip clerk, asses.sor, road commissiuma- 
ami justice of the peace. Iu all of tliese posiiiuiis 
lie has discharged his duties with prumpiuess and 
fidelity and no trust reposed in him, whether ut 
a puhlie or pii\ate naluru, has ever been betra\ed. 

Xathau A. Harrington was married iu this 
county, X'ovember 2.2, 1857, to Miss Margaret F. 
Sapp, a daughter of Hozekiah and Mary Jane 
(Bosket) Sapp, early settlers of Bureau county 
from Delaware. Mrs. Harrington was boi-n in 
the latter state, June S, 18:J7, and by her marriage 
became the mother of six children, five of whom 
are living, while Ora, the second child, born Oc- 
tober 27, ISUO, died September 17, 18G3. The 
others in order of birth are as follows: Clement, 
of this review; Adclbert, who was bora July .'iu, 
1861, and is living in Valparaiso, Indiana; Luella, 
who was born April 3, 1867, and is the wife of 
Albert Wilson, of Bureau township; Lydia M., 
who was born December 26, 186'J, and is the wife 
of Willard Harrington, of Wyanet township; and 
Ada, who was born August 28, 1872, aud is the 
wife of Mr. Tonkinson of Bureau township. The 
mother passed away July 23, 1892, aud on tluj 
Gth of January, 1895, Xatluiu A. Harrington wa^ 
aaain niaj'ried, Iiis second union being with 31rs. 
Susajr Carter, of Delaw are. He attends the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church and is a man of many good 
traits of character, being thoroughly reliable, 
kind-hearted and considerate to all who apijciil 
to him iu times of distress. His standing in the 
cuiiiiinniity is most excellent and he well deserves 
mention iu this volume as a representative citizen 
of Bureau county. 

Clement Harriugton was educate'] in the com- 
mon schools of Bureau county and was reared to 
the work of the farm, early becoming familiar 
with the duties and labors that fall to the lot 
of the agriculturist. Ho chose farming as a lii'e 
work and continued actively in tlie tilling of the 
soil until 1906, when he removed to rrinecton. 
He n><\v owns two hundred and forty acres of fin" 
land in Bureau township, which is devoted to 
g.meial farming and stock-raising, polled Durham 
and shorthorn cattle being chiefly raised. 

ilr. Harrington -vsas united iu marriage in 1877 
to ]iliss Hattie .M. Lysinger, who was born mi 
the farm which her husband now owns in ]5ure;i:i 
to\Miship. her father being Isaac Lysinger, wh'i 
came from Bedford cottnty, Pennsylvania, ar.d 
settled in tins county in pioneer tinu-. lioth Ih- 
and his wife arc now deceased. Unto Mr. and 
■Mrs. Harrington have been born six eliildrtn: 
Mollie, the wife of B. J. :Moyers, a resident of 
De Kalb county, Illinois; X. Earl, who nuirried 
Blanche Spratt"and lives upon his father's farm: 
Verna, who married Vir-il White ami reside- in 
Manlin^ r^wn-lup. thl-^Vouniv: ClitV, deeea>.'.' : 
IJait and MiNipmI i;.. ^oth at hmne. 

Mr. Harrington votes with the republican party. 
His I'.'ll.iw townsmen, rccoirnizing his worth and. 
ability, have freiiuently called him t- public olV;. •■■ 




CLEMKXT 11A1>'1;IX(,'I'()X. 



I'A.sT AXJ) I'j;i:sj:.\'j' of I'.iiiK.u: coi .xtv 



lie has scrvuj as bchoul director, as trustee, as 
supervisor, as townshiji treasurer three terms and 
for some time as justice of tlic peace and iu the 
discharge of his official duties has always been 
found prompt, accurate and reliable. I'-ceause of 
his wife's ill hcaltli he left the farm, removing 
to Princeton. He rents his land to his son, but 
still gives personal supervision to its improve- 
ment. He has iu Princeton a beautiful two-story 
residence at No. J-:?! South Chun;h street, where 
he an<l his faimlv ar.' imw pleasantly located. 



juiLX iii:i;r,Ki;T hi.'AXKi.iN. m. d. 

Dr. John -llertiert Frauklin, who has studied 
under the most eminent surgeons of tlie country 
and is a learned and able representative of the 
medical profession in Bureau county, now prac- 
ticing in Spring Yallev, was born in Lexington, 
Illinois, October 25, isC8. His father, James 
Nelson Franklin, was a banker of Lexington and 
also a farmer of that section of the state. His 
birth occurred in Indiana and in 1S3T he came to 
Illinois, settling in McLean county, where he still 
resides. He married Miss Sarah. P. Chase, a na- 
tive of this state and a daughter of Eev. Samuel 
P. Chase, a prominent minister of the [Methodist 
church. Her father was a native of New Or- 
leans and before the wai- was an extensive slave 
ownicr, but becoming convinced of the unright- 
eousness of this practice, he removed to the north. 
to make his home in a state where the influences 
of slavery were unknown. He therefore estab- 
lished his home in Illinois and he became a lead- 
ing member of the j\Icthodist clergy. 

Dr. Franklin, educated in the countrv schools 
of JIcLean county, afterwai'd became a student in 
a high school at Lexington and subsequently at- 
tended tlio Illinois AW'slcyan L'niversity of Bloom- 
ington and the Uni\er.-ity of Chicago, from which 
he was graduated iu ISSS. With broad general 
knowledge to serve as the foundation upon which 
to rear the superstructure of professional learning, 
he matriculated in Ku.'=h ^[edical College and after 
a thorough course was graduated in the class of 
1893. He then added to theoretical training the 
broad practical experience gained by a year's ser- 
vice in the Presbyterian Hospital of Chicago, 
where he came under the direct instruction of Dr. 
Nicholas Sonn, one of the most renowned sur- 
geons of America. In 1891 he removed to ^yich- 
ita, Kansas, where he engaged in practice for two 
years and while there aeteil as surgi'on for the 
Santa Fe Pailrord Couipany. Pie afterward lo- 
cated for practice at Peoria, Illinois, where he re- 
mained until 1S90, \\-hcn he came to Spring Val- 
ley. He makes a specialty of surgery in his prac- 
tice and operates in all tl'ic neighboring hospitals, 
his ability in this line being widely recognized by 
the profession as well as the general public. 

Dr. Franklin was married to ^fiss Florence Fav 



I'lzLcr, of Pratt, Kansas, who died iu 18'J6, and 
the following year he wedded Florence Edna Cam- 
eron, of Farmiugton, Illinois, by whom he has two 
children, Donald and Puth. Socially he is con- 
nected with the Masonic frateritity and the Elks, 
and his religious faith is indicated by his mem- 
bership iu the Congregational church. 'Everything 
that tends to bring to man the key to that com- 
plex mystery whii,-h we call life is of interest to 
him and his reading and investigation along the 
line of his profession have I'cen constant' and 
varied, bringing him broad and comprehensive 
knowled_-r. Tfo i,s furthermore a member of the 
.\iiiriir:in Mt.li.al Association, the Illinois State 
-M-lh-.il A.-o, ,,it:..u, the North Central, the Tri- 
State, thr Mississippi A'allcv and the Bureau 
Countv M.'dical Societies. He has recL'ived the 
heiietlt of in-trii, lion from sonje of the most emi- 
nent surgeon- of Anierir,: and, ambitious for ad- 
vancement, hr coiiilnncs a true love of scientific 
research with brnad humanitarian j)rinciple3 and 
in his chosen field of lahor has gained more than 
local distinction. 



JOHN A. GU.STAVSUX. 

Jolui A. Gusiavson, of Princeton, wh.v since 
190-1 has been interested in coal lands in William- 
son count}-, Illinois, the mines being now operated 
extensively and successfully, is a native of Swe- 
den, in which country his birth occurred in the 
year 1SG3. The days of his bojdiood and youth 
were there passed and in 1S84, when a young man 
of twenty-one years^ he came to America, making 
his way at once to Princeton. For some time he 
engaged in farming and in 1899 made lus first 
purchase of land, comprising one hundr-.d and 
forty-eight acres. He devoted his cuergie; to gen- 
oral agricultural pursuits until 1904, when he sold 
the farm and removed to Princeton, building a 
beautiful home on South First street, vrhich he 
now occupies, it being one of the fine residences of 
the city. He also owns another dv.-elling adjoining 
his home place and since 1904 ho has been inter- 
ested in the development of coal lands in Wil- 
liamson county, being one of a company formed 
of six men. They own four hundred and fifteen 
acres of coal lands. The mines are being profit- 
ably worked, turning out one thousand tons of 
coal per day, and Mr. Gustavson haudlfs both an- 
thracite and bituminous coal at the depot in 
Princeton. He is a man of good business ability, 
sagacious and far-sighted, who has turned his op- 
portunities to the best account and has worked his 
way steadily upward from a humble financial posi- 
tion to one of afiluenco. 

ilr. Gustavson was united in marriage to ^liss 
Josephine Spake, a native of Bureau courtv ami a 
daughter of :\Ir.and Mrs. L. 'SL Spake, e-Vly set- 
tlers of this county, who arrived here in 18-51. but 
both are now deL-easixl. In his tud.itical a-Tdiati'>ii 



oSG 



PAST AND ri;KSI-:.\"'J' of i;L];KAU rouxTY. 



Mr. Gustavsou is a rcjuiblicau ami fratriually is 
coimeetcd with tlie bluo lodge of ^Masons, while re- 
ligiously he is ideutifieil with the Swedish Lu- 
theran church. lie came to America with limited 
capital and for years devoted his entire time and 
concentrated all his energies toward the super- 
vision of the active details of his business, having 
the heart to resolve, the understanding to direct 
and tlie hand to execute all of its various transac- 
tions. A man of keen perception, of business sa- 
gacity and unbounded enterprise, he has become 
a factor in agricultural and industrial circles in 
his adopted county and is today enjoving the fruits 
of well directed labor. 



WHJJAM C. r.lIOKAAV. 

William C. Brukaw, conducting a grain business 
at Kasbcer, Bureau county, where he is also inter- 
ested in a general store, besides having landed pos- 
sessions in South Dakota, is a native son of this 
county, his birth having occurred on the oth of 
February, 1S52. His parents are George D. and 
Diana (Smith) Brokaw, the former born in Bel- 
mont county, Ohio, the latter in Decrfield, iEassa- 
chusetts. The father removed from Oliio to Bureau 
county, Illinois, settling near Princeton, the year 
of his arrival being 18-10, wdiile the motlier had 
come to this county from lier native state with her 
parents in 1833. In their family were ten chil- 
dren, of whom ouv subject is the siM-uiid in order 
of birth. 

William C. Brokaw was reared iu Bureau county 
and received his education in the district schools 
of Ohio township. After putting aside his text- 
books he started out in life on his own account by 
following the occupation of farming. lie contin- 
ued in farming pursuits until about seventeen 
years ago, when he engaged in the busines of buy- 
ing and soiling grain at Kasbeer. He has been 
very successftd in this venture", and by the careful 
manageincnt of his business interests, liis straight- 
forward dealing ami practical methods has built 
up a large and lucrative trade, until he is now 
nuinbered among the substantial merchants of his 
village. Year by year he has prospered and he is 
not only adding to his individual prosperity but 
is aiding in the development of his comuuinity by 
furnishing a nutrket for the farmers wlio have 
products for sale, for he always pays the lughest 
market price for the graii\ whicli he buys. He 
confines his attention not alone to the grain trade, 
for he is also interested in the live-stock business 
and sells gasoline engines, in which line he has 
been very successful. Tie is interested in a general 
store at Kasbeer, which, however, is managed by 
his sons, and they also own the building in which 
the business is carried on. Beside his mercantile 
interests in Kasbeer Mr. Brokaw also owns four 
hundred and eighty acres of laud situated in South 
Dakota. 



On the 13th of September, IS::, Mr. Biukaw 
was united in marriage :>> IMiss :\[ary M. Xell', uhn 
was born in Sehuvler ouiitv. Illinois, Xovember 
12, 1S.3:, a daughter nf Juhn .1. and Savannah 
(Bimm) Xefr, tlic fornvr born in Fennsylvaiiia, 
and the latter in Irnliana. In their family w.jre 
ten children, of uliom Mis. Brokaw is the tfurd in 
order of birth. She received her education in the 
schools of Bureau county. Unto ottr suliject and 
his wife have been born three children: Edgar L., 
born :May 2S, ISrS: Charles D., October 4, 1883- 
and Eugene X., December 19, 1SS9, and the last 
named was the first child born in the village of 
Kasbeer. 

Mr. Brokaw gives his [lolitical allegiance to the 
republican party, and in his religious faith is lib- 
eral being identified with no particular denomi- 
nation. Ho has taken an active interest in local 
affairs and has been called by his fellow towns- 
men to a number of otRees, serving as townsliip 
collector for one year and as school director for si.\ 
years, while for eight years he acted as postmaster 
at Kasbeer, and in all these positions he has provm 
himself loyal and trustworthy, filling eacli p.-i- 
tion in a very creditable manner. He is trulv a 
self-made man, having attained to his firescriL 
financial jwsition throuf;h his own well directed 
efforts. Though starting out on his own account 
with little or no capital he has through his in- 
dustry and determination accumulated extensive 
interests. He lias through his own personal efi'orts 
as well as Ids mercantile interests helped to make 
the village what it is today and is numbered among 
its most substantial and influential citizens. Ik' 
and his wife are prominent socially and ha^e a 
host of warm friends both in Kasbeer and Bureau 
countv. 



THO.MAS J. LOCKWOOJ). 
Thomas J. Lockuood. ileccased, whose well spent 
life made liis e.xample worthy of emulation, was 
horn iu Olean, Cattaraugus county, X"ew Y'ork, 
April IG, 1S3T. In early life he engaged in lum- 
bering, and the year IS.J.5 witnessed his arrived 
in Bureau county, Illinois, where he resided until 
the outbreak of the Civil war. He watched with 
interest the progress of events in the south, and 
feeling that his first duty was to his country he 
enlisted in lSG-2 and served as second lieutenant 
of Co7upany C, X'inety-third Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry. He was wounded at the battle of Cham- 
pion Hills, Mississippi, and lost tlie sight of both 
eyes, which occasioned his discharge in ISGl. He 
received a pension of seventy-two dollars per 
month, which, however, was only a slight compen- 
sation for the great loss which he sustaine'd. 
Though totally blind he was very successful iu his 
business affairs and he erected one of the best busi- 
nes blocks in Buda. He always had the interest 



of his to'^n 



upp. 



st and it was largely owing to 



PAS'J- AM 



\'j- uF r.riM'Au lor.NTV 



m- iHT.^.n-eninrc that luida now has its exi-rllcnt 
waterworks aud electric liglit plants. In his death, 
which otciuTcd Scpteiiibei' 16. lUOO, the city and 
Hiireaii county lost one of its most progressive 
and valuahlc residents. 

Mr. Lockwood was married at X''W Hcdicid, 
Illinois, on the 3d of January, 187:!. to ^Mrs. Ann 
Eliza Gibson, a daughter of E. II. and M.iry Ann 
Baxter. She is still living in Buda and i.< an active 
member of the First Baptist church, iu the work 
of winch she takes an active aud helpful part, 
serving as president of the Ladies' Aid Society. 
She has also been president of the Woman's Club 
at Buda and takes an active inieresL iu all that 
pertains to the good of the town. Slie still owns 
a clothing store in Buda aud hires a man to run it. 

In his religious faith Mr. Lockw-ood was a Uni- 
tarian. His life was actuated by honorable pri;i- 
ciplcs and characterized by manly conduct. He 
was alwaj'S loyal and progressive in his citizen.^hip, 
manifesting the same spirit of fidelity which he dis- 
played, when on southern battle-fields he followed 
the old flag. In his relations with his fellowirien 
he was straightforward and in all life's relations 
he made a record which won for him the unqaali- 
fied esteem and conCidence of l)is fellowmen. Uis 
death was the occasion of deep and wide-spread re- 
gret to all with whom ln' had come in contact and 
his nuMuory is yet cherislied by those who knew 
him. 



EPIIRAIM ATKIXSOX. 

No history of Walimt would be conipbtr wilh- 
out mention of I'^phruim_ Atkinson, who foi' many 
years figured prominently in l)usini>< tii-' Ics here. 
He was for more than two dccad( < a leading mer- 
chant of the town but is now prai-tically living re- 
tired. Throughout his long coimcction with the 
busini.^s interests he gained the respect aud re- 
tained the confidcuce of all with whom he was as- 
sociated and it would be difficult to find in Walnut 
one who is held in more genuine regard than he 
whose name introduces this review. 

A native of Ohio, his birth occurred near the 
city of Chillirothc on the IGth of December, 1839, 
his parents being John il. and Olive (Palmaler) 
Atkin-ou, the fomier a native of Pennsylvania 
and the latter of Maine. Their son Ephraim was 
a lad of thirteen years when ho accompanied his 
parents on their removal from the Buckeye state 
to Illinois, the family home being establi.shed in 
Limerick. A year later they removed to the An- 
drew Poss farm and subseciuently took up their 
abode at Dad Joe Grove, '^"hen four years had 
passed Ephraim Atkinson became a resident of 
Red Oak, where he lived for several years and then 
removed to Walnut, whore he has since resided. 
His education was largely acquired in the district 
Schools and for manv vears his was an active busi- 



meivial prosperity and ujibuilding of ^^■ahlut as 
well as to his individual success. Establishing a 
store in the town, he was there engagt'd in mer- 
chandising for twenty-two years and his business 
was one of the well kuowu features in the commer- 
cial life of the village. He always cariied a large 
and carefully selected line of goods, his prices were 
reasonalile and in his dealings he was strictly fair 
and honest, basing his business principles upon the 
rules which govern industry, economy and strict 
and unswerving intcgritj". Thus he made an un- 
assailable reputation in business circles. On ac- 
count of ill health he has retired fi'om merchan- 
dising and is now enjoying a well-earned rest and 
the fruits of his former toil. 

On the .?d of February, 1SG"2, Mr. Atkinson was 
united iu marriage to Miss Jlary Whitver, who was 
born June 20, 1S31. They traveled life's journey 
together for more than forty years and were then 
separated by the death of the wife, who passed 
away on the 29th of jMay, 1903. She was a lady 
of many good traits of heart aud mind and was 
held in the highest esteem by all wlio knew her, 
tlie circle of her friends being co-c.\teiisive with 
the circle of her acquaintances. Tiie four children 
born of this marriage are also deceased. 

In his political atTiliation Mr. Atkinson is a stal- 
wart republican, thoroughly iu sympathy with the 
principles of the party. He has served as township 
collector for si.xteen years and has filled other po- 
sitions of public trust, the duties of which have 
been promptly and faithfully discharged. He be- 
longs to the Cluirch of Christ in Walnut and is 
also a member of Walnut lodge, Xo. 722, A. F. & 
A. M., e.^emplifying in his life the teachings of the 
former and the tenets of the latter. He has helped 
to make the history of Walnut, leaving the impress 
of his individuality upon its commercial activity, 
its material progress and its moral advancement. 
He has always stood in support of those interests 
which are a matter of civic virtue aud of civic 
pride, has given his influence on the side of right, 
justice and truth, and in all life's relations has 
manifested a fidelity to high principles which have 
made him worthy the esteem which is uniformly 
accorded him. 



WILLIAM ZEXE GPAY. 
William Zene Gray, wlio owns and operates a 
farm of seventy-five acres in iliueral township, has 
been a resideut of this county for more than a half 
century, coming from Peoria, Illinois, in lS-3 1. He 
had gone to Peoria in 18-50 from Harrison county, 
Ohio, in company with his parents, William Henry 
and Susanna (Van Bibber) Gray. The father 
was a farmer by occupation and followed that pur- 
suit both in the Buckeye state and in Illinois. The 
son. W. Z. Grav, was born in Harrison county, 
Ohio. Februarv"24, 1S43, and was therefore onlv 



5SS 



PAST AXi) ntLiJLXT OF r.LJJI'AL' CUL'XTY. 



about SL'vm years of age at the time oi' the re- 
moval of llie family to this slate, and was a youth 
of eleven years when they came to Bureau couuiy. 
He acquired a common-school education and 
through the summer months worked at farjn labor, 
assisting his father in the improvement of tlie old 
home pro])erty. He came to ilincral township in 
1SG(), when a young man of about twenty-three 
years, and started out life on his own account by 
renting land, which he cultivated until his labors 
had brought him sufficient capital to justify his 
purcliase of a farm on Green river about twenty- 
two years ago. There he carried on general agri- 
cultural pursuits for some time, but subsequently 
sold that property and bought his present farm of 
sc\enty-five acres in ^Mineral township. Here he 
kas since resided and has placed his land under a 
high stale of cultivation, also adding many modern 
equipments in the way of good buildings and the 
latest improved farm maeliinery to facilitate the 
work of the fields. 

Mr. Gray was married on the 1st of January, 
ISG.S, to Miss Susan Martin, of ilineral, Illinois, 
a daughter of Eev. William E. and Susan ilartin, 
the father a minister of the ^Methodist church. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gray lost one child in infancy. A 
daughter, iS^ellie, survives and is the wife of 
Thomas E. Truedson, a farmer residing at Gold 
township. The wife and motlier passed away 
April 28, l!»0-i, and her death was deeply regret- 
ted by many friends as well as by her immediate 
family, for she possessed many good traits of char- 
acter and her kindly spirit, generous disposition 
and innate culture won her tlie esteem of all with 
whom she was brought in contact. 

Mr. Gray is a republican in his political views 
and keeps well informed on the questions and 
issues of the day, so that he is able to support his 
position by intelligent argument. He has served 
as township road commissiom'r and proved a capa- 
ble officer, but has never been active in the sense 
of office seeking, his business atTnirs making full 
demand upon his time and energies. He lias for 
a long period been an intercbted witness of the 
growth and development of the county as modern 
civilization has wrouglit its changes, replacing the 
conditions of pioneer life with all of the evidences 
of progress and imjirovement known in agricul- 
tural and coinrni-rcial rin-lrs iit the present day. 



KING J. AXI) J. II. DALE. 
King J. and J. H. Dale, constituting the firm 
of Dale Brothers, are well known farmers and 
stockmen of Fairfield township, making a spe- 
cialty of the breeding of shorthorn cattle. They 
also raise good horses, favoring Englishshire. 
These brothers operate three hundred and seventy- 
four acres of rich and productive land, of wliich 
tliree hundred acres constituted the home place 



of their fatlier, Thomas Dale, and tliey al^o have 
other laud which they have pureliased. 

King J. Dale was born in \\'hiteside county, 
Illinois, in ISUr..^ and is a sou of Tliomas and Eliza 
(Spargo) Dale. The mother still resides upon 
the old homesteail in Fairfield township, but the 
father passed away in 1899 in his seventy-seventli 
year. A native of East Kent, England, he came 
to America in 1S-jO and spent some time in New 
York. He also traveled in the central west before 
choosing a permanent location. He was one of the 
early residents of the county and for a long period 
a successful farmer and stockman. He came to 
Princeton in IS-Ji and assisted in getting out the 
ties for the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Rail- 
road. Later he located on section 36, Fairfield 
township, where he carried on farming until his 
death. In his farming operations he prospei'cd, 
being watchful of his business opportunities, care- 
ful in management and displaying keen sagacity 
in the control of his interests. In all of his busi- 
ness affairs he was straightforward and reliable 
and he was classed with the representative agri- 
culturists of his community. His, wife was born 
in Cornwall, England, and in her maidenhood 
came to Bureau county, giving her hand in mar- 
riage to Mr. Dale in Princeton. Tlioy lived on a 
farm near Princeton a few years, and then in ISGl 
removed to Whiteside county, where they lived for 
seven years, their home being near Tampico, and 
on the expiration of that period they located on 
what is now the old home property in Fairfield 
to^\nship. ]\Ir. Dale owned about seven hundred 
acres of land in Manlius and Fairfield townships. 
Mrs. Dale favors the :\Iethodist Episcopal church. 
She was one of the fifteen children of Stephen and 
Elizabeth (Itichards) Spargo. To her liusband 
she was a faithful companion and helpmate on 
life's journey and since his death ^he ha? lived 
upon the old homestead, being highly esteemed 
throughout the entire community. 

Unto ilr. and Mrs. 'Thomas Dale w-cre born the 
following named: Elizabeth, the wife of James 
A. Xichnlas, a resident of Manlius township; 
Thomas H. and John P., who are living in the 
same township; William C, of Fairfield township; 
King J., of the firm of Dale Brothers: Emma, the 
wife of Xewton Cole, a resident of Princeton; 
James IL. of the firm of Dale Brothers; Jennie 
L., the wife of Charles McCullough, of Manlius 
township; Carrie L., the wife of E. A. Fisher of 
Manlius town^Iiip; [Mary K.. at home; and Pris- 
cilla 8.. the wife of G. F. Hartz, of ilaulius 
townshij). 

The Dale Brothers are men of e.wellent business 
capacity and enterprise. They were educated in 
the district schools and reared' to farm work and 
now have charge of the estate left by their father, 
comprising tliree hundred and seventy-four acres 
of valuable and productive land in Fairfield town- 
ship. They till the soil, which brings forth good 
cro[i3, and they are prominently known as breed- 



\ 



THOMAS DAl.r 



FAST AXI) l'i;i;sK\T OF F.FFKAU ('OFN'I'V. 



crs auJ raistTS of ritock, e-pucially shorthoiu cat- 
tle, while their horses are largely of the English- 
shire hrecd. Their business has reached extensive 
proportions and the intense and well directed ef- 
forts of the brothers are bringing to thoni a very 
gratifying measure of success. 



SAJfUEIj B. CAFFF];. 

Tlie name of Carper has long lignred conspicu- 
ously and honorably iu connection with farming 
interests in Macon township, and he whose name 
introduces this review is one of the leading agri- 
culturists of this community, where he has lived 
from boyhood days. He was born iu Bedford 
county, Pennsylvania, August 34, 1S44, and is a 
son of Philip and Elizabeth (Bassler) Carper, 
mention of whom is made on another page of 
this work in connection with the sketch of Andrew 
Carper, a brother of our subject. 

Samuel B. Carper attended the public schools 
of Pennsylvania and of Illinois, and was also a 
student in Iron City College at Pittsburg. He 
was a young man of only twenty years when on 
the Sth of September, 1864, he responded to his 
country's call for aid and joined Company H of 
the One Hundred and Forty-sixth Illinois A^ol- 
unteers at Bunker Hill. He was mustered in at 
Peoria and thence went to Springfield and after- 
ward to Quincy, Illinois, where he was engaged in 
provost duly until the assassination of President 
Ijincoln, when the regiment was ordered to Spring- 
field for military duty at the time of the funeral. 
He was then mustered out at SpringCeld. July 
S, lSt;5. 

Jlr. Clarper returned to his home and aided in 
the work upon his fath.er's farm, being thus en- 
gaged up to the time of his marriage, which was 
celebrated on the 1st of February, 1S70, Miss 
Catherine Zink becoming his wife. She was born 
in Princeton, July 10, 184S, a daughter of Henry 
and Jane (Chaney) Zink. Her father, a native 
of Stonerstown, Bedford county, Pennsylvania, 
died in October, 1S4S, at the early age of thirty- 
three years. His widow, wdio was born in the 
=ame county near Huntington, in the year 1822, 
was of German descent and died at the ripe old 
aao of seventy-nine years. They were married in 
Pennsvlvania in 184 1, and had two children, the 
elder beins William D. Zink, who was born June 
11. ISlG.^and died Januarv 24, 1880. He was 
married to Elizabeth Wooding, of Kansas, and 
they had three children, two sons and a daughter, 
but the parents are both now deceased. . Their 
children are: Buritt IT., who is living in Idaho; 
Frances, a stenographer in St. Tenuis. Mis^oTiri : 
and William L., wlio is living in Kansas. ^Mrs. 
Zink. the father of IMrs. ('arpor. was of Scotch 
lineage and was a wagnnmaker by trade. His 
political allegiance was given to the whig party. 
In 1845 he came with hi; familv to I11inoi.=, 



settling in Fuhuii enunty, and in 1S4G tiiey re- 
moved to PriuuL-toii, uhere the death of ^Ir. Ziuk 
occurred. His vil'i; was a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. After living in Princeton 
for fourteen years she married Abraham Clark, 
and they became tlie parents of two children, 
Elinore and Arthur. Mr. Clark was a farmer 
by occupation, and on selling his land removed to 
Buda, where he conducted a meai market for 
about three years. He then went to Adel, Iowa, 
in 18GT, and there carried on farming ilirough- 
out his remaining days. Both he and his wife 
died in Iowa. His political endorseau::it was 
given to tin? men and measures of the republican 
party. 

Tlie year 18-53 witnessed the arrival of Samuel 
B. Carper in Illinois, and soon after his marriage 
he began farming for himself on eighty acres of 
land. In 187? he erected the residence which 
he now occupies and he has made all of the im- 
provements upon his farm, including the erection 
of substantial buildings and the planting of fine 
shade and fruit trees. He is now cultivating one 
hundred and sixty acres of land, which he owns, 
and he is also a bi'eeder of high grade cattle, hogs 
and horses, feeding his own stock and making 
shipments to the city markets. His business in- 
terests are to him a gratifying source of income, 
for he is watchful of opportunities pointing to 
success and utilizes his advantage^ to the best of 
his ability. 

Unto 'Slv. and Mis. Carper have been b'^rn six 
children, namelv : Leora A., who was born Octo- 
ber 31, 1870, and died March 21. 189.5; Ida J., 
bom February 26, 1873; Samuel A., who was 
born February 7. 1875, and died April P. 1895; 
Aniui :\ray, bo'rn :\[ay 17, 1S7S; Mary Edith, born 
June 22," 1SS2 : and William Hov.'ard. July 5. 
1885. 3Ir. Carper is a republican and keejis well 
informed on the questions and issues of the day. 
yet has never cared for public office. He served, 
however, as justice of the peace of his tov^-nship 
for one term. Fraternally he is connected, with 
French Grove camp, No. 196, M. W. A., at Buda; 
with the Yeoman of America; and with Emory 
post. G. A. E., at Buda; and in these organiza- 
tions has the esteem of his brethren, who recog- 
nize in him many sterling traits of character. 
His residence in the county covers a lor.g period, 
entitling him to mention with it= earlv settlers. 



AUGUST IIASENYAGEE. 
Augu-t Hascnyager is a partner in the firm of 
Fisher & Ilasenyager, proprietors of a meat mar- 
ket in V.'alnut. He is one of the enterprising 
young liusiness men of this town and is one of 
it* native citizen=, having been born here April 
15, 1874. His parent- were Fred and Anna 
(Barman) Hasonvager. The father wa= born in 
Germany in 1S29 and died on the 1st of January. 



FAST AXJ» riM-: 



:.\-J' 0\: I'.LKKA 



lOUl, ill the iv^c of jrveiity-llve years, while liis 
wife, aUo a native of Geniiaiiy, is still living. 
They crosscJ the briny deep to the new world iii 
the early 'yOs^ and after residing for a short time 
at St. Louis, Mi.^souri, came to Princeton, after 
which they established a permanent home in thi.s 
county. The father was a farmer by occupation. 

In the district schools of Walnut township 
August llasenyagcr acquired his education. His 
boyhood and youth were passed uneventfully, 
but after attaining liis majority he entered busi- 
ness life, and is today a wide-awake, alert and 
representative merchant of the village of Walnut, 
where as a member of the firm of Fisher & Hasen- 
yagcr he is conducting a well appointed meat 
market. They have a fine trade and their patron- 
-agc is annually incrca.sing. It is their aim to 
carry a large line of first-class meats, and by 
reason of tlicir fair prices and straightforward 
dealing they have secured a business which is 
already profitable and which is steadily growing. 

On the IGth of January, 1895, ^Mr. Hasenyager 
was married to ^liss Lizzie Fordham, who was 
born Xovemljer 12, 1873, in Walnut township. 
Like her husband, she, too, was educated in the 
district schools, and slie ha^ become the mother 
of two children: Arthur W.. born Januarv 30, 
189:; and Ethel F., born October 12, 1S9D'. 

Mr. Hasenyager is an independent voter, cast- 
ing his ballot for men and measnrcs rather than 
for parly. He belongs to the Mystic Workers of 
America, and is well known in his village and 
township as a wide-awake, energetic business man 
of genial disposition and cordial manner — quali- 
ties which hare rendered him popular with a 
large circle of friends and acquaintances. 



]Usb; 



of 



JOHX ZIXK. 

John Zink, for almost half a century a resident 
of Bureau county, where as a jirogressive and en- 
terprising farmer he was widely and favorably 
known, was born in Bedford county, Pennsyl- 
vania, August 23, 1S13. The family was estab- 
lished in Pennsylvania at an early epoch in its 
development, the grandparents being John and 
Elizabeth (Howe) Zink, both of whom, were 
natives of that state. The father of our subject, 
Samuel Zink, was a native of the Keystone state, 
born August 11, 17SS. At an advanced age he 
went to Ohio, settling in that state in ISil, and 
in 18+4 he came to Bureau county, Illinois, where 
he joined his son George, who had arrived a year 
previous to that date. He then remained a resi- 
dent of Bureau county until his death, which oc- 
curred February lo, 18GG. His political allegiance 
-was given to the republican party. His wife, who 
bore the maiden name of Catherine Hannav*alt, 
was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
August 26, 1789, and died February 10, 1886. 
She was of German extraction, and both she and 



Xo event i>f .^peeial imjiortanee occurred lo v,u y 
the routine of farm life for John Zink in his b..v- 
liood days. He was one of a family of eleven ehil- 
dren, which fact brought with it some advaniag. ,< 
and some disadvantages, lie shared with ih- 
others in the labors of the farm and acquired a 
district school education. There are always many 
pleasant recollections associated with a childhood 
where the family is a numerous one, the spirit of 
cheer and joy abounding iu such a household. 
Mr. Zink was still single when in 18-14 he caiu" 
with his parents and the family to Bureau county. 
Soon afterward he purchased a farm near liuda, 
in Macon township. Few roads had been laid out, 
and there were still tracts of broad prairie that 
was uncultivated and covered with the nativ' 
grasses. All grain was hauled to Chicago as the 
nearest market, as there was no railroad facility 
for shipment at a near point. As time passed by 
and invention brought improved machinery ilr. 
Zink kept abreast with the progress of the times 
and cultivated his farm according to more mod- 
ern methods than were in vogue in pioneer days. 
His first purchase of land comprised eighty acres, 
to which he added front time to time as his finan- 
cial resources increased, imtil he o^Tied over two 
hundred acres of valuable land, which he operated 
until his life's labors were ended in death. He 
was a man of strong, rugged constitution, enjoying 
good health until his last illness, and thus he res- 
olutely carried forward the work of the farm and 
brought it under a high state of cultivation. 

On the 5th of September, 1847, Mr. Zink was 
married to Miss Elizabeth Thompson, who was 
born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, Xo- 
vember 2, 1S16, and who came to this county with 
her parents in 1845, settling near Bnda, whore she 
died Xovember 27, 1859. Four children had been 
born of this marriage; Mar}-, the wife of Eeubon 
Smith, of Buda; John A., who is a retired farmer, 
living in Ramona, South Dakota ; Harriet, who 
died at the age of three years, and Christian Win- 
field Scott, a farmer of Elliott, Xorth Dakota. 

After losing his first wife Mr. Zink was again 
married, in Ohio, on the 7th of ilarch, ISiSo, his 
second union being with Miss Elizabeth Sensel, 
who was born in Kno.x count}', that state, August 
22, 1835. Her girlhood days were spent in that 
state. In the paternal line she is of English 
lineage and in the maternal line of French descent. 
Her parents were John and Catherine (Schueliley) 
Sensel, botli natives of Hagerstowi\, Maryland, 
where they were reared and married. They be- 
came residents of Knox county, Ohio, when it was 
still a new and undeveloped region, settling there 
during its pioneer epoch. There the father fol- 
lowed farming up to the time of his death, which 
occurred when he was sixty-six years of age, while 
his wife pa.-sed away at the age of seventy-lour. 
Thev were both consistent and devoted members 




Ml;. AXi) ^[i;s. JuHX 7ASK. 



PAST AND 



:k.-;e.\t of bukeau cuux'J'v 



o9.J 



of tlie Lutheran ehurdi, and were hi^^ily esteemed 
residents of their couuniuiity. Mr. Sensel was a 
son oi' Peter Seusclj who caiue from Germany to 
America and served for seven years in tlie Ee\o- 
lutionary war. 

Unto Julm and Elizatjeth Zink were born sis 
children: James L., who died in infancy; George 
E., wlio is mentioned elsewhere in this volume; 
Catlierine E.^ the wife of W. A. Rail, a resident 
of St. Paul, Minnesota; Samuel H., a farmer of 
Maeon township, Bureau county; Margaret Jane, 
who died at the a^e of four years; and Alnieda M., 
the wife of C. E~. Blaine, of Tower Citv, North 
Dakot.i. 

Mr. and Jlrs. Zink were members of the ]\Ieth- 
odist chuch_,_in which the latter is still active. He 
continued his farming operations here until his 
death, which occurred April 2, 1892, when he 
was seventy-eight years of age. He was a strong, 
robust man, never ill until the illness which ter- 
minated his life. On the contrary, he was ever 
active, energetic and enterprising, and what he 
acquired came to him as the reward of his earnest 
labor and perseverance. His name was a synonj-m 
for business integrity, and his life was character- 
ized by high principles, so that those who knew 
him instinctively paid deference to him as a man 
of uprightness and honor. Mrs. Zink is still en- 
joying good health at the age of seventy-one years, 
and now makes her home with her children. 



jilaiit'jd by the Hocks and herds of the modern 
fanner. 'The change was great, yet he had 
slrcngili of character suHicient to enable him to 
step into the stream of progress and move grandly 
on, looking for and fully believing that there 
were great things in store for this country and 
this people. 



JESSE EMEUSON. 
Jesse Emerson was one of the early si'ttlers 
of this county, having come here with his father 
in 1S3G at the age of twelve. He spent his early 
years upon the farm, attending the country schools 
and afterwards a private school in Princeton. He 
spent some time in teaching and while thus en- 
gaged he commenced the study of law. He also 
acted as clerk in one of the stores at Buda and 
finallj- opened a store of his own, During all 
these changes he found time to continue the study 
of his chosen profession and in 18-58 was admitted 
to the bar am] from 1860 spent most of the time 
in his law practice. In 1873 he was elected county 
judge and filled that ofllce for four years, when 
he again resumed his practice. Judge Emerson 
was a plain, unassuming man, a man who pos- 
sessed more than average ability in many ways. 
He was a safe counselor and would lead a client 
out of a law suit rather than into one. He was 
one of the old residents and was respected for 
his honest and obliging ways. He lived to see 
great changes in all his surroundings. "When he 
came here this was a part of Putnam county and 
was sparsely settled. The deep, rich soil of most 
of the county had never been disturbed by the 
white man, and he lived to see these barren 
prairies covered ' witli the products of civili-/a- 
tiou. He lived to see the deer and the wolf sup- 



CHAP.LES HENKY FABEK. 

Cliarles Henry Faber was born December 18, 
16G3, on what is now the old homestead farm in 
Clarion township, where he still resides. He is 
descended from German ancestry, his parents, Pe- 
ter and Margaret (Mueller) Faber, having both 
been born in Germany. The year 1850 witnessed 
their arrival in Bureau county, Illinois, and they 
cast in their lot with the early settlers, ilr. Faber 
provided a livelihood for himself and family by 
following the occupation of farming, to which he 
devoted his energies until his death, which oc- 
curred in Mendota, Illinois, September 13, 1885. 
His widow still survives at the age of seventy-seven 
vears and makes her home in Mendota with her 
youngest daughter, Jlrs. V. C. Schaller. 

Charles H. Faber of this review- had seven 
brothers and two sisters: George, who is now a 
butcher in Paw Paw. Illinois; Henry, who was 
principal of schools in California, Oregon and 
^McIIenry county, Illinois, and died in 1900; Gil- 
t'crt, assistant cashier of the First National Bank 
at Mendota; John C, who was a merchant in "Wal- 
nut township. Bureau county, and is nov,- deceased; 
Bertha, the wife of Eev. George Hueter, of Kocky 
Ridge, Ohio; Christian, a cattle buyer of Paw 
Paw, also associated with his brother George in 
the meat business; William C, a breeder of fine 
racing stock at Paw Paw; Fred G.. also of Paw 
Paw; and Emily, the wife of V. C. Schaller, who 
is engaged in the carriage business in ilendota. 

Charles Henry Faber supplemented his prelimi- 
nary education, acquired in the common schools, 
by study in Mendota College, completing his course 
in lS;r. He then returned to the old homestead 
to engage in farming and has remained here con- 
tinuously since. He today owns and operates two 
hundred and thirty-five acres of land which is 
valued at the highest market price, and his well 
improved farm is indicative of the care and su- 
pervision which he bestows upon his place. 

On the 17th of February, ISSJ, Mr. Faber was 
married to ^liss ilargaret Truckenbrod, who was 
born June 30, 18G1. and is a daughter of Henry 
and Catherine (Billhorn) Truckenbrod, both na- 
tives of Germany. They came to Bureau county 
witli the early settlers and through the explosion 
of a lamp Mrs. Truckenbrod was burncil to death 
in 1SG8. Mr. Truckenbrod is still living and is 
now retired in Mendota. 

The marriage of Mr. and :Mrs. Faber has been 
blessed with four chiblren: Ella E.. Agnrs E., Flor- 
ence jr. and Clement F, The parents are members 



J'M 



PAST AND IMIHSEXT OF I'.UliKAU CurXTY. 



of tlie LutliLTiiu cluuvh and in his political views 
Mr^ Fabur is soiuewhat liboral, voting for candi- 
dates rather than pariy at local el'.'ctioas, while at 
national elections he usually supports the demo- 
cratic party. lie has, however, voted the republi- 
can ticket wlien he believed that its candidates were 
better qualified for ollice than those of the opposi- 
tion. He has been township collector for two years 
and justice of tlie peace for eight years and in the 
discluirge of his official duties has been most con- 
scientious and zealous. Fidelity in public affairs, 
reliability in business life and friendshij) and ge- 
niality in social relations have uuide ^fi'. Faber a 
man respected by all who li;i\e the pleasiiie of his 
acquaintance. 



THFOBALl) J. TIKITZ. 

Theobald .J. Heitz. a re.-idcut of Solby town- 
ship, where excellent farniiug iuierests return him 
a gratifying financial reward for his labors, lives 
on section 10. He owns three hundred and 
thirty-four and a half acres of fine farming laud, 
all in Selby township, but not all in one tract. 
He was born upon the farm which is nov,' his 
home, his natal day being September 22, 184S. 

His parents were Gottlieb and Eva (Foute) 
Heitz. The father, a native of Baden, Germany, 
was born in ISOO, and was there reared to the 
age of eighteen years, when he removed to Byron, 
Germany, i'or si.\ years ho was a soldier of the 
German army. While living in Baden lie served 
for one year in the war with the French, and 
afterward was with the army for five years. He 
resided in Byron until 1S47, and was married 
there, subsequent to wliich time he engaged in 
farming and the raising of cattle. Attracted by 
the opjiortunities of the new world and hoping 
to enjoy better advantages for the acquirement 
of a comfoitable living for his family, he crossed 
the Atlantic in IS-IT, accompanied "by his wife 
and their seven daughters, settling on section 10. 
Selby township, where he purchased land from 
John Bushon. Here he carried on general agri- 
cultural pursuit* until his retirement, and be- 
came known as one of the enterprising, leading 
and prosperous agriculturists of his community. 
During the last forty-five years of his life he 
lived retired, and died at the age of eighty-eight. 
In community affairs he was deeply interesred, 
and assisted in building the p]vangelical Lutheran 
church of Selby township, of whicli he was a most 
. active and helpful member. His life was honor- 
able, his actions manly and sincere, and his upright 
life gained him an enviable position in public 
regard. His wife was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, 
Germany, in ISO-t. and remained a resident of 
Bureau county from 1x47 until her death in ISSs. 
She passed away about four months prior to her 
husband's demise. In their fami'y were rlinm 
children, of whom throe died in ea'rlv life, while 



eight ivadicd years of maturity. Catherine be- 
came the wile of Conrad Weissenburger, and died 
in Xc\aiia (.'ity, California, in ISD'J, leaving seven 
childicii, four sons and three daughters. Chris- 
tina became the wife of Joseph Gessepele, and re- 
sided in Selby township until her death about 
twenty years ago. She had four children by her 
iirst marriage, and later she became the wife of 
Ferdinand Werling, by whom she had six chil- 
dren, three sons and three daughters. Magdaleua 
Heitz became the wife of Casper Hage, and re- 
moved to Peru, Illinois. Following the death of 
her first husband she married Peter Smith, who 
passed away some years ago. She still makes her 
home in Peru, and has two daughters and a son 
living and has lost one daughter. Barbara is the 
wife of Samuel Heitz, residing at Depue, this 
county, and they have eight children, four sons 
and four daughters, who are yet living, and have 
lost two. ilaiy became the wife of John Balzer, 
who died at their home in Peoria, Illinois, leav- 
ing two sons and three daughters, and Mrs. Balzer 
now resides in Chicago. Caroline is the wife of 
Jacob Sessler, of southern Illinois, and tliey have 
seven children. 

Theoljald J. Heitz, the other member of the 
family, vias reared on the home farm in Sell)} 
township, where he has spent his entire life. He 
started out on his own account, practically eni]ity- 
handed, and has been very successful. In early 
manhood he began operating a corn sheller and 
soon afterward a thresher, and he has continued 
in the latter business for the past forty years, 
being probably the oldest thresher in this part 
of the state. He first operated the home farm of 
sixty-seven acres on shares, and finally through his 
industry and economy secured a sufficient cajiital 
to make purchase of the property. Since that 
ti.ne he has added various tracts until he now 
has an extensive acreage and is accounted one of 
the prosperous agriculturists of the community. 
He has made all of the present fine improvements 
on the home farm on section 10 and also on his 
farm on section 4, Selby township, and all who 
know aught of his history recognize that he is a 
man of sterling purpose, whose indefatigable 
energy and honorable dealing have been strong 
features in his business career. 

ilr. Heitz was married in Princeton to jri=> 
Christina Irich, who was born in Hesse-Dann- 
stadt, Germany, in 1S47. and came to America 
with two brothers and a sister in 1S61. She is a 
daughter of Conrad and Christina (Hoppe) Irich. 
Her father died in Germany and the mother after- 
ward came to the United States and for fifteen 
years lived with Mr. and Mrs. Heitz, passing away 
in their home about 1SS6 or ISST, when seventy- 
seven years of age. Mrs. Heitz v\-as one of eight 
chihlren, six sons and two daughters, but these, 
however, were born of the father's first marriage. 
Those who came to Anu^rica were Adam, Loui-. 
John. William. C^itherine and Mrs. Heitz. Of 



PAST AND PlfESKXT OF BinjEAU -COUX'J'V 



59 i 



tliLvr William .liij.l at tlic home of his sistur Chris- 
tina, an. I the oihtTs are all vet liviim. 

Mr. ami .Mrs. Ileit/. are the parents of seveu 
children. :Mary, the eldest, became the wife of 
Charle.'^ Lange, and died at her home in Selby 
township in 1901, at the age of thirty-five years, 
leaving tliree children, David, John and Harry, 
while a son and daughter had passed away. Chris- 
tina is the wife of John P>liart, a farmer resid- 
ing near Seatonvillc, in Hall township, and they 
have three sons and a daughter, John, Edward, 
William and Tina_. while two sons and a daughter 
are deceased. Catherine is the wife of E. Grant 
Searl, of Solby township, and they had three 
children, but only one, Ira, is now living. Emma 
is the wife, of William Hoppe, of Peru, Illinois, 
and they have one sou, Adolph. Lena, at home, 
is the widow of ,lohn P>ohn, and they resided in 
Selby and Dover townsliips. They had one child, 
John. Jacob married ^liss Lizzie Dedrich, by 
whom he has a daughter, Pearl, and their home 
is upon a farm in Selby township. 

Politically, ilr. Ileitz is a democrat, and is now 
serving for the fifth year as road commissioner. 
He has also been school director for thirty-three 
years and was pathnmster. His ofHcial duties 
have ever been discluirged with promptness and 
fidelity and he stands for progressive citizenship 
at all times. Both he and his wife are members 
of the German Evangelical church of Selby town- 
ship and are most worthy residents of the com- 
munity. Mr. Heitz has spent hi- entire life upon 
the old homestead farm and his has been a most 
creditable record, for, starting out on his own ac- 
count empty-handed, he lias worked his way stead- 
ily upward to success througli the persistency of 
purpose and energy which never fail to ^\ in a 
desirable financial reward. 



WILLIAM PECK. 

William Puck is one of the citizens of worth in 
Fairfield township, where for the past eleven yeais 
he has served as assessor, and the fair and" im- 
partial as well as prompt manner in which he has 
discharged his duties is manifest in his long con- 
tinuance in the office. His business interests are 
those of a farmer and stock-raiser, and his farm 
is on sections 9 and IG, Fairfield touiiship, where 
he owns one hundred and sixty acres of land. This 
has been well improved, largely by Mr. Ruck, who 
has resided upon this place since ^March, 1899. 
He had formerly made his home near Thomas, in 
Fairfield township, and his residence in this town- 
ship altogether covers a period of twenty-six 
years. 

ilr. Puck is a native of Dover township, born 
in lSo3, his father being George Puck, who died 
in April, 1902, at the age of seventy-nine years. 
He came to Bureau county in ISob. and after 
working for a year in Dover town.ship at farm 



labor he removed to Fairlield toun^hip and pur- 
chased ei-hty acres of land urai -he vUlagH of 
Thomas. To this he added a., hi- linau. lal re- 
sources increased, until he owned three hundred 
and sixty acres in Fairfield to\vii.-liip and one 
hundred and sixty acres in Tampico township, 
Whiteside cminty. His life furnish.es an excellent 
example of bu.-iiie^s aetivity and integrity. He 
served for many years a- hiijhway commissioner, 
and gave his political allegiance to the democracy. 
As a man and citizen he enjoyed to the fullest ex- 
tent tlie confidence, good will and respect of all who 
knew him. His wife, who bore the maiden name 
of Elizabeth Stallard. was born in Gloticestershire, 
England, whicli was al^o the birthiilace of Mr. 
Puck. They uere married in that country, and 
one child had bei'ii b<nu unto t!i-:au ere their 
emigration to tliL- new world. F'or a brief period 
they tarried in Xew York, but sioii afterward 
came to this county. Mrs. Puck survived her hus- 
band for about four years and died in January, 
190G, at the age of seventy-eight. This worthy 
eouj)le were the parents of nine cliildren, seven 
of whom are yet living, and all were reared upon 
the old home farm in Fairfield township. These 
are: ili-s. Annie Goembei, of Prophetstown, Illi- 
nois; William, of this review; Fred', now a retired 
farmer, living in Tampico; Mrs. Alice Kopp, of 
Audubon county, Iowa; John, of Bailey, Michi- 
gan; Joseph, of Kenton, Michigan, and Lottie, 
who is living in Peoria. Charles and ilrs. Bessie 
Houdctt, also of this family, botii passol away 
several years ago. 

William Puck was reared in Fair:!. -Id township, 
where he has spent the greater part ••: his life, and 
the work of the farm early became familiar to hhn 
and has been to him a source of livelihood since he 
attained man'.^ estate. He was married in Ke- 
wanee, Illin.o's, to Miss Elizabeth ]i[oon, of Henry 
county, Illinois, a daughter of ^h: and Ztlrs. 
Stephen ^loon, early residents of tliis state. Her 
father died in IS?-.', but her mother is still living. 
Li their family were six children: Seth, who 
ri'-id.'s ill Annauan, Illinois; Thomas, whose home 
is in Henry county; ilrs. Ellen Booth, also of 
Henry county; Hannah, at home; and Mary, the 
wife of i'red Puck, of Tampico, a 'irother of our 
subject. L'nto 3Ir. and ^[rs. \\'illiaui Puck have 
been liorn two sous: Eugene W., who at the age 
of t\veiu_\'-two years is an electrician in Pock 
Island, Illinois, and George Stephen, who was 
eighteen years of age on the oth of October, 1900, 
and is attending Brown's Business College at Mo- 
line, Illinois. 

Politically ^Mr. Puck is an inder-.ndent prohi- 
bitionist, who believes firmly in the principles of 
the part}', but knowing hov,- impossi'.le it is to elect 
its camlidates. he frequently votes for the best 
candidates of other parties. He has served for 
eight years as highway commissioner of Fairfield 
township, and has for years been a school trustee, 
blatters relating to the public welfare ami those 



PA.S'J' AND I'l; 



:sT ov Brj;j;Ar roL'XTY, 



interests wliieli are of general inouicui elicit his 
attention and receive his indorienient. Socially 
he is coniierted with the Modern Woodmen camp 
at Yorktownj and the family are all members of 
the Christian elnuxh there. They are prominent, 
too, socialh', and have many warm friends in this 
part of the slate. 



LORENZO J. KKXDALL. 
Lorenzo J. Kendall, to whu-o inleii.-e and well 
circles in Uureau county, was born in St. Johns- 
directed energy is attributable the present en- 
viable position which he occupies in llnancial 
bnry, 'N'ermont, May 15, 185T, and in ISGl, when 

'a little lad of four summers, was brought to Bu- 
reau county, Illinois, by his mother, iiis father 
having died when the son was but six months old. 
His parents were Lorenzo and Eosamond (Lang- 
maid) Kendall, likewise natives of the Green 
Jfountain state. The mother still survives and is 
living with a daughter in Kansas City. ^Missouri. 
She has a third interest in the estate left by her 
husband, who went to Calif oi'iiia in 1819 and 
spent some time in tlie gold fields of that state, 
buving land in this county with his earniniis on 
the racific coast. There "were three children of 
that marriage, one of whom is deceased, while 
Emma A. is the wife of L. A. Laughlin, a lawyer 
of Kansas City. 

Lorenzo J. Kendall, residing in lUireau county 
from the age of four years, acquired his early 
education in the district schools and it was sup- 
plemented by study in Princeton high school, from 
which he was graduated in the class of 18T8. 
After completing his own education he engaged 
in teaching school for ten years, acting for six 
years as prineijial of the La Moille schools and for 
one year as principal in the Ohio schools. At 
length, putting a'^ide the duties of the profession, 
he turned his attention to merchandising and be- 
came a dealer in lunibei- and coal at Tampico, Illi- 
nois, where he remained actively in business for 
nine years. On the expiration of that period he 
came to La ^loille and accepted the position of 
cashier in the Xorris & Woods bank, where he re- 
mained until lO'il. In July of that year he 
formed a partnership with W. C. Xorris, becom- 
ing one of the successors of the firm of Xorris & 
Woods, and is now cashier of tiie bank. This i- 
one of the strong and reliable financial institutions 
cf this part of the county and its business policy 
is such as neither seeks nor requires disguise but 
will bear the closest investigation and scrutiny. 
Mr. Kendall took a most active interest in the 
erection of the new bank building. He is a man 

"of good business enterprise and capacity, who has 
been watch.ful of opportunilie- pointing to suc- 
cess and has steadily worked his way upward. In 
addition to his banking interests he has one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of choice land, the orii'inal 



cost of whhAi was five (loilar.r per acre, but which 
is today wuilh one bundled and fifty dolhus j,,,.- 

^Ir. Kendall was married in 1888 to ]\liis Har- 
riet J. lluruett, who was born in Bureau couniv 
Illinois, June 7, 1862. She was educated in tlie 
public schools of this county, supjilemented by 
a course in Knox College in Galesbiirg, Illinois. 
Tier parents were Jeremiah Y. and Olive (Smith) 
Burnett, who were natives of Schoharie couiily, 
New York, and in 18G0 became residents of La 
-Moille, Bureau county, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. 
Kendall have one of the handsome homes of La 
^loille. Both hold membership in the Congrega- 
tional church, in the work of which Jlrs. Kendall 
takes a most active and helpful part. She is serv- 
ing as one of the trustees and as treasurer of 
the church and her father wa,? at one time deacon 
therein. 

Mv. Kendall belongs to La Moille lodge, Xo. 
:vS3, A. F. >S: A. M., to the Koyal Arch chapter. 
and to Tampico Garrison, Xo. 103, Knights of 
the Globe. Ilis views upon the temperance ques- 
tion are indicated by his active and earnest sup- 
jiort of the prohibition party. He is now chair- 
man of the county central committee of that 
party and is the nominee on that ticket for state 
senator. He has given the support of the ballot 
to that party for twenty-four years and docs all 
in his power to promote temperance principles and 
secure the abolition of the liquor trafllc, believing 
this to be one of the most dominant issues lieforn 
the people of the country today. He is a man of 
strong purpose, firm in support of his honest con- 
victions and unfaltering in his allegiance to -what- 
ever he believes to be right. He has served as 
mayor of La iloille and is now the only original 
member of the Alleu school fund left. lie today 
occupies an enviable position in financial circles, 
to which he has attained by his energy and enter- 
prise. After years of honest and successful effort 
he occupies the present position of trust in wliicli 
he is now found, being aecorderl a place among the 
leading and prominent biwine^s nien of La ^foille. 
Both he and hi= wife occu[)y an enviable social 
position and their manv good traits of characfcr 
have uihIc tltem loved and esteemed by all with 
whom tbev have come in contact. 



JOTIX H. LI'THEi;. 
.John II. Luthi>r. piirehasitig a-eiit for 
Spring Valley C'oal Company, and also agi-n 
the Town Site Comiiauy. virtually controUin; 
real estate market at Spring Valley, is a m;' 
keen business discrimination and enterpri-e. 
has won a creditable place as a represimfatii 
the business interests of his adopted cit\. 
was born in Somer-et. Massachusetts. Octohr 
1S6,3. his pareiu^ hein? .Tohn II. and Jo^.^f 
A. (Brown) Luther, the former a native of 



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NOKRIS AND KF.XJtAIJ; BANK. 



PAST AXJ) rj;Ksi:\T of BUIMIVL' culnty. 



603 



sachusftts and the hitler of lihode Island. Ke- 
nioving to the middle west iu 1870, the father 
established his home in Sycamore, lUinoij, where 
he engaged in the manufacture of flax. He died 
in 1905, at the advanced age of seventy-eight 
years. 

John n. Luther, a youth of seven summers 
at the time of the arrival of the family in Illi- 
nois, pursued his education in the successive 
grades of the Sycamore public schools, and after 
completing the high school course became a tele- 
graph operator and em2)loye of the Xortliwesteru 
Railroad Company, with which he was connected 
for thirteen successive years. In 1893 he became 
connected with the Spring Valley Coal Company, 
and, removing to this town, he entered upon a 
clerkship and has been advanced from time to 
time, until he is now purchasing agent for the 
company. He is also agent for the Town Site 
Company, the original owners of the town lots, 
controlling virtually all of the property on the 
market. 

In 1884 Mr. Luther was married to Miss ilary 
E. Waterman, a daughter of William Waterman, 
a pioneer of De Kalb county. His wife bore the 
maiden name of Mary A. Scott, and both were 
natives of Herkimer county. New York. Unto 
Mr. and Mrs. Luther were born three children : 
William A., born September 17, ISSG, in Syca- 
more; Evelyn, born in CarroUton, Illinois, in Xo- 
vember, 18SS; and Lorenzo, born iu Troy Grove, 
Illinois, December 14, 1891. 

Mr. Luther is a member of the Congregational 
church, in which he is serving as trustee, and in 
the work of which he is actively and helpfully in- 
terested. He is a man of good business capacitj-, 
who has steadily progressed through the exercise 
of his native talents. Each promotion has come 
to him in recognition of his able service and large 
responsibilities now devolve upon him in connec- 
tion with the positions he is filling. 



JOHX H. WEISSEXBURGER. 
John H. Weissenburger, an enterprising fanner 
and stock-raiser, owning a well improved tract of 
eighty acres, situated on section 4, Hall town- 
ship, is a native son of Illinois, having been born 
in Putnam county, June IG, 18.50, a sou of George 
and Eva (Hahu) Weissenburger, both natives of 
Bavaria, Germany, where they were reared and 
married. In 1847 the fatlier emigrated with his 
family from Geimany to the United States, hoping 
he might enjoy better business opportunities here 
than were aflordcd in his native land. He first 
settled in Bureau county, where he remained for a 
short time, but later removed to Putnam county. 
In 1857, however, he again returned to Bureau 
county, locating in Westfield township, where he 
engaged in general agricultural pursuits for a 
time, and then removed to Hall township, where 



he ]HUehii.~ed the fanii on wluL-h our su'g'L-ct now 
resides. Here the mother passed away in 1SG2, 
when about fift^'-two years of age. I'iio father 
afterward removed to La Salle county, about 1894, 
and died there two years later, at the venerable age 
of eighty-eight years. Both he and his v,-ife held 
membership in tlie Evangelical Lutheran church 
of Selby townshij). In their family were five sons 
and two daughters, namely: Conrad, born April 
5, 1836, is now a retired farmer, living in Marshall 
county, Iowa. Catherine, born Septen.uer 19, 
1837, became the wife of Oliver Reginald, and 
resided in Putnam county, Illinois, bur is now 
deceased, having passed away in 1889. Eva, born 
April 19, 1838, is the wife of William Keutzer, 
and resides in Limmick township, La Salle county. 
George, born July 30, 1810, resides in Hall town- 
ship, Bureau county. Valentine, born Ocr'.ber 30, 
1841, is a resident of Ladd. Louis, born May 1?, 
1S4G, is a resident of Peru, Illinois. John H. 
completes the family. 

John H. Weissenburger, the youngest member 
of his father's family, was practically reared iu 
Hall township, being but seven years of age when 
brought by iiis parents from Putnam courTty. He 
was reared in the usual manner of farm lads, as- 
sisting in the work of the home farm and during 
the winter months pursuing a common school ed- 
ucation. He has always followed the occupation to 
which he was reared, working on the home farm 
until his marriage, when ho removed to a farm iu 
V.'estfield tov.nship. where he remained for three 
years, subsequent to which time he purchased the 
home farm on secticm lb, Hall township, lo which 
ho removed and which has since continued to be 
his home. Here he h;;- :-i""''\ n-iny mO'_lern im- 
provements, and is en- _ ' i: . , I al agricultural 
pursuits, in which he i- :i.> .ii, >. Iili desirable suc- 
cess. In addition to tl;e cuUi\ation of the fields 
he is also engaged in raising stock of ihe best 
grades, and this branch of his business is also 
proving remunerative. 

Mr. Weissenburger has been twice nutriied, his 
first union being with Miss Catherine Dorn, whom 
he wedded on the 14th of March, ]S71. She be- 
came the mother of two children: Jennie E., born 
May 29, 1873, and John H., Jr., born M-rch 14, 
1877. The latter married Miss Justina Hassler, 
and resides in 'U estfield township, while i:.e sister 
is engaged in teaching. The wife and mother 
passed away September 30, 1883, at the age of 
thirtj-'One years and three mouths. 

For his second marriage ilr. Weiss-rnburger 
chose Miss Eli:<abeth Werner, whom he wedded 
on the 4th of February, 18SG. She was born in 
Bavaria, Germany, October 23, 1863, a daughter 
of Charles and Catherina (Keililer) Werr.er, who 
emigrated from Germany to the United States in 
18G.5, locating in Perry county, Indiana, v>-here the 
father purchased a fann and engaged in general 
agricultural pursuits. This continued to be his 
home until 187G, when he removed with his family 



PAST AND I'JiJ'SEXT UF JlUliEAU COL'XTY, 



to Selby townshij), JUircuu eouiuy. Jlluiuis, wLere 
he remained for four years, and then removed to 
Weslfield township, and hiter to Hall township, 
where his deatli occurred in 1S99, when he had 
reached tlie advanced age of seventy-scveu years. 
His wife survived until Decemlier 24:, 1904, when 
she was called to her final rest, having also reached 
the age of almost seventy-seven years. In their 
family were thirteen children, of whom two died 
in infancy, the others being: Charles, a resident 
of White county, Illinois; Philip, a resident of 
Bureau county ; Christian, a resident of the Indian 
Territory; Jacob, of Canada; Louis, residing in 
Westfield township, Bureau county; Catherine, 
who became the wife of William Geringer, but is 
now deceased, having passed away in August, 189-1, 
a.tjhe age of thirt3--si.x years; Adam, of the Indian 
Territory; Elizabeth, now ilrs. Weissenburger; 
Louisa, who became the wife of William Gerin- 
ger, but is now deceased, having met lier death in 
a railroad accident at Chicago; Johanna, the wife 
of Henry Weissenburger, residing in Marshall 
county, Iowa ; and Henry, also of Iowa. The mar- 
riage of Mr. and ^Mrs. Weissenburger has been 
blessed with a daughter and son : Ijillian, born 
January 11, 1887, and Alfred, born :\ray 25, 1S1T2, 
both at home. 

In politics Mr. Weissenburgei- is a democrat 
where national questions are involved, but at local 
elections votes an independent ballot, supporting 
the men whom he regards as best qualified for 
ofFice, without considering party affdiation. He 
has been called to a number of township offices, 
having served as assistant supervisor of Hall town- 
ship for six years. He has also served as school 
director, and for the past thirteen years has been 
highway commissioner, doing ell'ective work in the 
improvement of the highways. Fraternally he is 
an Odd Fellow, being identified with lodge Xo. 
803, at Ladd, and ho and his wife are meudjcrs 
of the Evangelical Lutheran church. 

Having spent almost his entire life in this coun- 
ty, covering a period of nearly a half century^ Mr. 
Weissenburger is familiar with the progress that 
has here been made, having given substantial aid 
to many movements for the betterment of this sec- 
tion of the state. He has been successful in his 
business affairs, as is evidenced by his well im- 
proved farm, and he is today nmnbered among the 
enterprising and progressive farmers of Hall to^ra- 
ship, where he has a wide and favorable acquaint- 
ance. 



GEOPiGE P. PETTEE, SP. 
George P. Pettee, Sr., a retired farmer, resid- 
ing on East Peru street in Princeton, was born 
in Pntland county, Vermont, February 25, 1832, 
and is a son of George W. and Eleanor (Wrisley) 
Pettee, both of whom were natives of the Green 
Mountain slate. The parents never came to Illi- 
nois, always remaining in the east. George P. 



Pettee was reared in the Grccu .Mountain .^tal.- 
and beiug a farmer's sou became fuiuiliar uiii;' 
the work of field and meadow. He aciiui..',! i,,^ 
education in the common school.-^, and in i,^:,.; 
at the age of twenty-three years, came to Bureau' 
county, Illinois. The Chicago, Burliuglon i 
Quincy liailroad had just been completed t1iruu-h 
the county. 

On his arrival here he rented a tract of land 
near Princeton, upon which he lived for a vcar 
and a half, arid then bought eighty acres on "sec- 
tion 10, Concord township. With resolute pur- 
pose and unfaltering diligence he carried on the 
work of the farm and as the years passed he added 
to his property imtil he now owns thi-ee hundred 
and si.\ty acres of fine land in Concord township 
and also three hundred and twenty acres in Ne- 
braska. He put all of the improvements upon 
his farm and there are some hue majde trees v.diieh 
have grown fj-om the seed that he planted. His 
place is supplied with excellent farm buildings 
and the land is highly cultivated. He erected tli- 
residence on his farm and altogether has one 
of the best farming properties of the county. 
Wliile actively engaged in the care of the farm he 
also carried on live stock business, raising cattle, 
hogs and horses for the market. Thus year by 
year he prospered and at length with a handsome 
competence he retired in 1900, removiug to 
Princeton, where he purchased a fine home on 
East Peru street. He now rents his land, which 
brings him a good income. 

On the Sth of July, 1856, "Sh: Pettee was 
nnited in marriage to iliss Margaret Sinnolt, 
also a native of Vermont, in which state they be- 
came accpiainted. She came to Illinois about 185 I 
with her parents, Michael and Johanna (Bryaid) 
Sinnott. By the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Pettee 
were born five children: Mamie, living at home; 
George P., who is cashier of the bank at Seaton- 
ville and resides in Princeton; John C, who is 
living on a farm near Wyanet; Allie A., who 
died in 1890; William J., who is residing in Chi- 
cago, where he conducts a shoe store and is al-o 
engaged in the insurance business. 

The parents are members of the Congregatinnnl 
church, and on the Sth of July. 1906, they cele- 
brated their golden wedding, about one hundred 
of their friends being present, on which occasion 
they received many substantial tokens of the es- 
teem in which they are uniformly held and alto- 
gether the occasion was a most enjoyable one to 
all who participated therein. In his political allil- 
iation '^lv. Pettee was a stalwart democrat, cast- 
ing his first presidential ballot for James Ihi- 
chanan in 1856, but he is now independent in 
polities. He served as school director for many 
years and the canse of education finds in hini a 
warm and stalwart friend hut he has never souglit 
or desired other offices. When he came to Illinni? 
he had no capital but resolutely set to work to 
achieve a competence and has been very suece--- 



■"- ;^, 



G. 1". PETTKE, SK. 



PAST AND ITxESKXT OF BUKEAU COUNTY, 



cor 



fill. Ill business he possesses exeellcnt jurlgiueiit 
and liis enterprising spirit lias made him a pros- 
perous citizen, while his genuine personal worth 
and devotion to the public good have caused him 
to be numbered among the useful and desirable 
residents of his adopted county. 



HAKVEY il. TRIMBLE. 

Harvey Clarion Trimble^ who resides at Prince- 
ton, Illinois, was born near Wilmington, in Clin- 
ton count}', Oliio, January 27, 1S42. His father's 
name was Mathew Trimble, and his mother's 
maiden nani.e was Lydia Thatcher. The family 
home was removed from Ohio to Illinois, and lo- 
cated on a farm near Princeton, in Bureau county, 
Illinois October 25. 1S43. and remained there un- 
til 1867, when it was changed to Princeton. 

The subject of this sketch was the sixth sou. 
He has two sisters and one brother younger than 
himself. His education was obtained in the com- 
mon schools, supplemented by a partial course at 
Eureka College, Illinois. Ho quit college to enter 
the army. He enlisted as a private of Company 
K, Ninety-third Illinois Infantry, August 21, 
1862, was promoted to sergeant major of the regi- 
ment on the Sth of September of the same year 
and became adjutant of the regiment April 13, 

1864. He served as acting assistant adjutant gen- 
eral of the First Brigade, Third Division, Fif- 
teenth Army Corps, from March 28, lS6o, until 
the ?6th of April following and of the Second 
Brigade. Fourth Division, Fifteenth Army Corps, 
from April 26, 1865, to May 31, 1865. He was 
mustered out near Louisville, Kentucky, June 33, 

1865. and was finally discharged at Chicago on the 
6th of July of the same year. 

WTiile executing orders received from his com- 
manding officer on January 13, 1SG3, while on a 
scout, he was captured by the enemy, near Eidge- 
way, Tennessee, and remained a prisoner fourteen 
days, being released on January 27, 1863, which 
was the twenty-first anniversary of his birth. He 
rejoined the regiment January 30, 1863, near 
Memphis, Tennessee. During the entire period of 
his service, he was on every march (except about 
ten miles, when he was a prisoner), and in every 
battle and skirmish in which the command partici- 
pated. In August, 1863. Colonel Putnam recom- 
mended him to the governor of Illinois, for pro- 
motion to a captaincy. He had no intimation of 
the recommendation until several days had elapsed 
after it was made. When he learned of it, he 
promptly declined the promotion, and so wrote to 
Governor Y'ates, and the commission was not 
issued. 

On January 27. i8G4, Lieutenant Colonel Bus- 
well gave him a military album, inscribed as fol- 
lows : 



'•Headquai-tcrs 93rd 111. lufty. Vols., 
"Huntsville, Ala., January 27th, 'lSG4. 
'•ITaevey M. Tiumblk, Sersfeant Major 93rd 111. 
Inf'ty. 
■■'Allow mo to present to you, on this, your 22nd 
birthday, this album, as a slight token of respect 
for vour manly courage at the battles of Jackson, 
May 14th; Champion Hill, May IGth; Siege of 
Vicksburg, from May 19th to July 4th, and Tun- 
.nel Hill, November 25th, 1863. Also for your 
gentlemanly and soldierly bearing and strict at- 
tention to dutv, whether in Camp, on the March or 
Field of Battle. 

"N. C. BUSWKLL, 

"/./. Col., Comd'g Ecgt." 

On being relieved from duty as acting assistant 
adjutant general of the brigade, the brigade com- 
mander issued and pre.-ented to him the following 
complimentary order: 
"Head Quarters 2nd Brig., 4th Div., 15th A. C, 

"Near Washington, D. C, May 31st, 1SG5. 
"General Orders No. 11. 

"Lieut. H. M. Trimble, having, at hi; own re- 
quest, been relieved from duty as A. A. A. General 
of this brigade, the general commanding desires 
to express his pleasure at the manner in which he 
has performed his duties and his high apprecia- 
tion of him a? an eftlcient officer, in offi^'e, camp 
and field. 

'Tiv order of 

"BiuG. Glx. Wm. T. Clark, 
"L B. Stamopd, Capt. and A. A. A. Gen. 
"To Lieut. H. :\L Trimble, Adjt. 93d 111. Vol. 

Inftv." 

On his return borne, in the employ of the clerk 
of the circuit court, he arranged and indexed all 
tlie cases previously disposed of in thai court. 
On DecemVier 4, 1865, he was appointed deputy 
clerk of the circuit court of Bureau county, Illi- 
nois, and served in that capacity until November 
20, 1867, when he resigned. 

On October 9, 1866. he was married to Miss 
Margaret S. Dakin. They have five sons, namely : 
Winfrcd K., Cairo A., Piobert C, Harvey D. and 
Perry D., and six £;ran.lchildren, as follows: Win- 
fred E.. Clara E., Margiret V., Cairo D.. Cairo W. 
and Robert C, Jr., children of the three oldest 
sons, respectively. 

Immediately after the close of the war. he re- 
sumed the study of law. and was admitttd to the 
bar, licensed as an attorney and counselor at law, 
on November 20, 1867, and has been in regular 
practice continuously ever since, at Princeton, Illi- 
nois. 

He was master in chancery of the circuit court 
of Bureau county, !>v successive appointments, 
made by Judge Edwin $. Leland, from April 1, 
1868, until December 26, 1877, at which latter 
date his resignation of the office, dated T'ecember 
3, 1877 was accepted. 

He was elected as a member of the boar I of edu- 
cation of school district No. 1, in Princeton town- 



COS 



PAST AXn I'KKSEXT OF ])UIiKAU COUXTY. 



ship, April G, ISIS, for one year, to 1111 a vacancy, 
and was re-elected, for terms of three years each, 
successively, April 5, 18?9, Anril 1, 1S82, April 
4, 18S.5, April 7, 1SS8, April 18, 1801, and April 
21, 1891. and served continuously until April 17, 
1S97. And he served as secretary of that board 
of education from April 12, ISSO, until April 17, 
1897, being elected each year by the board. 

He was elected as a member of the board of 
education of the Princeton high school district, 
June 7, 1S81, for two vears, to fill a vacancy, and 
was re-elected, for thT-ce years, June 5, 1883, and 
served until June 1, ISSG. 

On February 27, 1PS6 he v,-as appointed by the 
mayor and confirmed by the city council, as one 
of the first board of directors of the public library 
a.nd reading room of Princeton, Illinois (the liai- 
son library), and served until July 1, 1888, assist- 
ing in the organization of the library. 

He was four times elected county judge of Bu- 
reau county, Illinois, to wit, November 6, 1877, 
November 7, 1S82, November 2, 1886, and No- 
vember G, 189-1. He was commissioned as county 
judge, December 1, 1877, to date from December 
3, f877, and December 1, 1882, to date from De- 
cember 4, 1SS3, and December G, 1886, to date 
from then, and November 21, 1894, to date froin 
December 3, 1894. He served continuously as 
county judge from December 3, 1877, until De- 
cember 4, 1890, and again from December 3, 1894, 
until June 18, 1897. Ho resigned the office June 
8, 1897, and the resignation became effective June 
IS, 1897, when he was commissioned as circuit 
judge. 

He was elected president of tlie lUireau County 
Soldiers' Association at the date of its organiza- 
tion on July 8, 1S9G. and re-elected, at the first 
annual reunion, October 15, 189C, for the term of 
one year. He was elected connnander of Ferris 
post," No. 309, Grand Army of the Republic, De- 
partment of Illinois, located at Princeton, Illi- 
nois, December 9, 1896, and was installed Janu- 
ary 13, 1897 (just thirty-four years after he was 
captured by the Confederates), for the term of 
one year. 

On June 7, 1897, he was elected circuit judge, in 
the Thirteenth judicial circuit of Illinois, com- 
posed of the counties of Bureau, La Salle and 
Grundy. He was commissioned as circuit judge 
June 18, 1897, for the term of six years, and took 
the oath of oflice on that day. Since the expira- 
tion of his term June IS, 1903, he has practiced 
law in Princeton. 



SAMUEL MILES KNOX. 
Samuel Miles Knox, ex-judge of the county 
court of Bureau county, is as widely known as 
any man in the county, his business interests for 
a period of twenty-fivo years bringing iiini in con- 
tact with thousanils of people. He is a native of 



Juniata county, Pennsylvania, born November 11, 
1S2G, and is the son of John and Eunice Knox, 
the former of whom was born in Lancaster, Penn- 
sylvania, and a son of Hugh Ivnox, a native of 
Scotland. The latter was also a native of Penn- 
sylvania, daughter of Samuel Pauling, who was a 
soldier in the Pevolutionary war, serving in the 
regiment known as "Congress Own" and com- 
manded by Colonel JIoscs Ilazen. He enlisted 
December 11, 177G, and servcd_ until 17S1. Sam- 
uel Pauling's ancestors came 'from England tu 
Philadelphia with the Penn colony. Both are 
now deceased. 

The boyhood and youth of our subject were 
spent upon his father's farm in his native county, 
and his literary education yvas completed in Tus- 
carora Academy, teaching during the winter 
months in order to be able to attend scIio'jI in 
the summer. Having a desire to enter the medical 
profession, he studied for two years, still teaching 
during the winter months, but on account of a 
lack of means to complete his course he tem- 
porarily abandoned it. Seeking employment, with 
a view of replenishing his purse, he was for three 
years engaged in diii'erent localities in selling the 
German history of the United States. As a book 
agent he was quite successful, and as fast as he 
accumulated a little money he would loan it to 
some responsible farmer in Bureau county. When 
he desired to resume his medical studies he was 
persuaded to take payment in corn at twenty-five 
cents per bushel. When ready to ship his' corn 
a difficulty arose in the way of securing cars for 
that purpose. Cars were very scarce, and he con- 
cluded the quickest way out of the difficulty would 
be to go to Chicago, purchase a couple of car- 
loads of lumber for the Pond Creek station on 
the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway, and 
unloading fill with grain for shipment back. This 
he did, and, making a fair profit on both lumber 
and corn, concluded to embark in the lumber and 
grain business at Pond Creek. 

Mr. Knox remained at that place but a short 
time and then removed to Wyanet, where he con- 
tinued in the same business and also in general 
nierchandising. He also received the appoint- 
ment of postmaster of the place, being the first 
to fill that position. In lS-37 he commenced 
reading law with Charles Barry, having given up 
the notion of becoming a physician. A year or 
two later he sold out his business in Wyauet, and 
in 1S61 removed to Princeton and read law with 
"Nlilton T. Peters until he was admitted to the 
bar in the fall of the same year. In ISGl he was 
elected county judge of Bureau county, and 
served the term of four years in a very acceptable 
manner. The year previous he was the democratic 
candidate for the legislature but was defeated. 
Mr. Knox, in coinpany with J. I. Taylor, made an 
extended tour in Europe, sailing in 1SC7 ai;d 
returning in 1868. 

Judge Knox contiuucd in the iiraetiec of li'.w 



\ 



/ 



/ 



CI. 



'H/hx^'^ 



PAST AND niESEXT OF BUIiEAU COLWTY, 



uutil 1S7G, but for about four years prcviuus 
irave little attention to it, having in 1S70 coni- 
menced ilealing in real estate in connection with 
the land department of various railroads. For a 
time he was with the Ifissouri, Kansas & Texas 
Railroad, and later with the Leavenworth, Law- 
rence & Galveston Eailroad. In 1873 he became 
connected with the Chicago, Burlington & Quiney 
and the Burlington & Missouri Kiver land de- 
partment, operating principally in Illinois and 
Indiana, selling lands owned by these companies 
in Iowa and Nebraska. In the settlement of 
these respective states Judge Knox was instru- 
mental in locating many thousands of permanent 
settlers. The jdan pursued was by getting up 
excursionsand showing the lauds, selling them at 
a reasonable price on long tinie with low interest 
and crediting the amount gf the railroad fare on 
the purchase nuide. It is said that ho disposed of 
more land in Iowa and Nebraska for these roads 
than other of the twenty agencies. From 1875 
until 1880 the sales of his office averaged about 
twenty thousand acres per month, some months 
running up to fifty thousand acres. Some land 
in Iowa, which he sold from five to ten dollars 
per acre, is now worth from one hundred to uuc 
hundred and fifty dollars per acre. 

In ISSO Mr. Knox took the agency for the 
Union Pacific lands, and did much effective work 
for that road, his operations extending up the 
Platte river. His sales for this road were also 
quite extensive, especially during the years 1SS2, 
1883 and 18S4-; The excursions under his super- 
vision were alwa^-s popular, the judge taking spe- 
cial pains to make everyone comfortable. Famil- 
iarizing himself with the lands by personal visits 
to each locality, spending days in driving over 
them, he was always prepared to give the intended 
settler such advice and suggestions as were desired. 
No one was deceived by him and made to pur- 
chase that which did not suit his taste or not suit- 
able for the purpose intended. 

During all these years the judge had an eye 
to his own interests, and from time to time nuide 
investments in lands in Kansas and Nebraska, 
some of which have proven quite profitable. In 
Allen county, Kansas, he has about five thousand 
acres divided into farms, which he has rented. He 
also owned in Nebraska about fifteen thousand 
acres, most of which has been sold to actual set- 
tlers on long time. In 189-5 he dissolved his 
(jonncction with the Union Pacific, and again ac- 
cepted a position with the Chicago, Burlington & 
Quiney Railroad. The country is now pretty well 
settled along the lines of the road, for which he 
has been employed, therefore as great a volume 
of business may not be transacted in the future 
as in the past, yet the energy and familiarity of 
our subject with the business will develop all 
there is in it to the profit of the road and the 
perfect satisfaction of those with whom he deals. 

Judge Knox and Jlis-; Hannah H. Weaver were 



united in marriage December 31, lS.3i, at Wyanet. 
She is a native of Pennsvlvania and a daughter 
of Obadiah and Elizabeth (Heinibach) Weaver, 
who came from Allentown in that state to Bureau 
county with her parents in 1844. By this union 
five children were born : Anson H., a farmer in 
Bureau county; Mary, wife of Justus M. Stevens, 
of Princeton; Emma L., deceased; Ada L., de- 
ceased; and Samuel F., an attornev of Chicago, 
living at Highland Park. Both daughters were 
well educated, having finished their course in 
Europe, Ada L. spending five years in Dresden 
and Paris. 

The life of Judge Knox affords an example of 
what can bo accomplished by one having the de- 
termination to do. Coming to Bureau county a 
poor medical student, without means to finish 
his course, he commenced work in a calling de- 
spised by snme^ but as honorable as any, one which 
some of the greatest licrocs and statesmen for 
a time followed, and with the means thus obtained 
laid the foundation for the success in life which 
he has attained. In social circles, as well as in 
business affairs, the judge stands well in the esti- 
mation of all. Fraternally he is a Mason and has 
taken all of the degrees including the thirty- 
second. In politics he is a democrat. 



ALBERT R. UMHOLZ. 

Albert R. Umholz, editor of the Bureau County 
Record, published at Princeton, was born in ilon- 
ticello, Illinois, February 14, 18S0. His father, 
August Umholz, was a native of Zurich, Switzer- 
land, and a son of Archibald Umholz. August 
Umholz erected the first building ever put on the 
grounds of the Illinois University. He married 
Miss Caroline Salheim, a native of Germany, and 
died in the year 1898. 

Albert R. Umholz was educated in the public 
schools and entered the newspaper field at eight 
years of age by working after school hours and 
in the periods of vacation as errand boy in a 
newspaper office. In 1893 he left school, being 
then but twelve years of ago, and secured a posi- 
tion in the printing office of the Piatt County 
Bulletin, where he remained for two years. When 
only fourteen years of age he began the publica- 
tion of the Ivesdale News at Ivesdale, Illinois, 
and after a year ho sold the paper, accepting the 
position of foreman on the Piatt County Repub- 
lican, acting in that capacity for four years. A 
year later be est.iblished a job printing business 
on his own account, which h? conducted continu- 
ously and successfully until the lOth of February. 
1901. when he formed a partnership with his 
brother, F. E. Umholz. and purchased the Bureau 
County Record from S. E. Brede. In 1903 the 
business was incorporated under the state laws. 
The brother afterward went to California, and 
■Mr. Umholz. of this review, purchased the con- 
trolling intere-t and has .since continued the pub- 



C13 



PAST AXD PI!i:SEXT OF JiUKKAI' COUXTY, 



lication of the KccorJ. The paper was not in a 
prosperous condition when he took charge, but 
under his management it has become a leading 
journal of the county, with a large circulation and 
good advertising patronage. It is devoted to the 
dissemination of general and local news, and is a 
stalwart champion of many progressive measures 
which have had a direct bearing upon niunieipal 
progress and improvement. 

On the 29th of July, 1900, ilr. Umholz was 
married to Miss Hattie Eshelman, a daughter of 
Wendell Eshelman, of j\Ionticello. They started 
in school together, went through the primaries 
together, and the acquaintance of earlv childhood 
continued until they had atlained adult age and 
were married. They now have two children: one 
son, Darjd, and a daughter, Arva Euth. 

Mr. Umholz belongs to the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, Ben Hur and several other so- 
cieties. He has never been an aspirant for public 
office or public notoriety of any kind, and be- 
lieves that a man may be a good citizen without 
being an active politician. He stands for all that 
is progressive in citizenship, and is a champion 
of those measures which are matters of civic 
virtue and civic pride. He is yet a young man 
and has attained creditable success for one of his 
years. Dependent upon his own resources from 
practically the age of eight years, his life has 
been marked by consecutive advancement and his 
native ability and unfaltering perseverance have 
brought him to the creditable position which he 
now occupies as a representative of the business 
life of his adopted county. 



J. F. TUcWILLIAMS. 

J. F. McWilliams. who for nineteen years has 
resided at his present home on section 5, Leeper- 
town township, where he owns and operates a fine 
farm of ninety-two acres, is serving for the ninth 
year and fourth term as supervisor of the town- 
ship and because of his activity, in public life and 
agricultural circles is numbered among the lead- 
ing residents of this part of the county. He was 
born in Morgan countv, Ohio, April 2, 184-3, a 
son of AVilliam F. and "Mary (Van Wy) Me Will- 
iams, who came to Illinois in April, 18.57, settling 
at Jfaldon, Bureau county, where they resided un- 
til called to their final rest. The father engaged 
in farming and secured a tract of land and good 
home there. Both he and his wife were natives 
of Ohio, having been born in Belmont countv. 
The father died in 18S.3, at the age, of seventy-two 
years, while his wife passed away in March, "lSS7. 
They were the parents of four children : ^lary A., 
the deceased wife of H. H. Piper, of Berlin town- 
ship, this county; S. A. and W. H.. both residents 
of Shenandoah, Iov.-a; and J. F., of this review. 

The last named is now the only one of the fam- 
ily living in Bureau county. lie was in his fif- 



teenth year when he came from Ohio to Illinois, 
and for three years he was a student in Dover 
Academy, acquiring a good education whereby he 
was qualified for teaching, which profession he 
followed for twenty-eight years, while for the pa^c 
nineteen years he has engaged in farming. He 
began teaching in 1SG5 in Bureau county and 
within the period of twenty-eight years devoted lo 
that profession he taught for five winter terras in 
ilontgomery county, Kansas, where he also owned 
and operated a farm. He was a capable educator, 
imparting clearly and readily the knowledge tli^t 
he had acquired and the public-school interests of 
tlie county were promoted through his effective 
labors. For nineteen years, however, his attention 
has been given to general agricultural pursuits 
and he is now the owner of ninety-two acres of 
rich and productive land on section 5, Leeper- 
town township, where he has carried on general 
farming, having placed his fields under a high 
state of cultivation, so that he annually harvests 
good crops. 

Mr. McWilliams \\-as married in this county to 
Miss Mary E. Miller, who was born at Springfield, 
Ohio, in 184-5, a daughter of Mr. and 5Irs. Day- 
ton Miller, both of whom died in the Buckeye 
state. They had a family of twelve children, of 
whom four came to the west, three being residents 
of Bureau county and one of Kansas. ' The mar- 
riage of Mr. and Mrs. McWilliams has been 
blessed with three children: Charles D., who re- 
sides in Leopcrtown; Bertha A., of Chicago, who 
is a stenograplier by profession and has traveled 
extensively for the past few years; and William 
F., at home. They also lost two children: Lulu 
B., who died at the ago of thirteen months; and 
Ada B., who died at the age of twelve years. 

In politics Mr. McWilliams has always been a 
democrat. He has served as assessor and collector 
and in fact has flUed all of the oftices of the town- 
ship save that of justice of the peace. His duties 
have been discharged with promptness and fidel- 
ity and with a sense of conscientious obligation. 
He belongs to Princeton lodge, Ko. 587, A. F. & 
A. jr., and he is well known in the city and 
throughout the surrounding country, his business 
interests having brought him a wide acquaintance 
while favorable regard has ripened into warm 
friendship and he is one of the most highly es- 
teemed residents of this community. 



JOHX G. PREXDERGAST. 

John G. Preadergast resides in Berlin township, 
where he operates a farm of two hundred and 
forty-nine acres, and in its control he displays 
thnrougli familiaritv- with the best methods of 
tilling the soil. A native of X'ew York city, he 
was born July 5, 1S77, and dates his residence in 
Illinois from the 2Sth of August, 1881. His 
parents were Thomas and Bridget (Shanley) 




MR. AXD ^n;.s. J. r. :M,_^viTJ.TA:\rs. 



PAST AXD i'j;i:si:xT of bukeau county. 



Pi-eiidorgast, natives of Ireland. The father came 
t(i tlie United States in 1SG9 and the mother a few 
years hitcr. In tlicir family were six children, of 
whoiii the subject of this review was the hrst born. 
At the usual age he entered the common schools, 
and therein mastered the branches of learning that 
fitted him for the duties vrhich come with a busi- 
ness career. After leaving school lie began farm- 
ing, and has continued in that occupation to the 
present time, bringing to bear in his work the 
practical experience and knowledge which he 
gained in his boj'hood while assisting his father 
at fann labor, lie now operates two hundred and 
forty-nine acres of excellent land and annually 
har\ests good crops. Each year he adds to his 
capital, and he expects soon to invest his money 
so that he can engage in the cullivatiou of a farm 
of his own. 

As a companion and helpmate for life's journey 
Mr. Prendergast chose ^liss Helen Thielen, to 
whom he was married in Kcwance, Illinois, Febru- 
ary 11, 1903. She was born in Chicago, No- 
vembor 2G, 1ST5, and their union has been blessed 
with one child, Helen JI., born December G, 1903. 
Mrs. Prendergast is a daughter of Paul and Mary 
(Gillett) Thielen, the former a native of Ger- 
many and the latter of Illinois. They had nine 
children, of whom Mrs. Prendergast was the third. 
She completed her education in the high school 
at Kansas City, from which she was graduated, 
and for five years she was a successful teacher of 
Bureau count}'. 

Mr. Prendergast belong.^ to Arlington lodge, Xo. 
3111, M. W. A., i!ud in his political views is a 
democrat, while • his religious faith is indicated 
by his membership in the Poman Catholic church. 
He is a self-made man, and his diligence and busi- 
ness integrity are qualities which have brought him 
a good start in life and which will win for him 
still greater successes in the future. He and his 
wife live in one of the best neighborhoods in Berlin 
township, and their excellent qualities have gained 
for them the friendly regard of neighbors and of 
all by whom the}- are known. 



ADAM CARPER. 
Adam Carper is the owner of Pleasant View 
fani! in Jfacon township, a valuable propcrtv 
which in its excellent appearance indicates the 
careful supervision and practical methods of an 
enterprising owner. Long years have passed sinee 
he came to the county, for during more than a half 
century he has resided within its borders. His 
birth occurred in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, 
on the 19th of January. 1S38. his parents being 
John and Catherine ("Smith) Carper. The father, 
aho a native of the Kcvstone state, was born June 
11, 1S07. His entire life was spent upon a farm 
and his educational advantages were very limited. 
In lS-")-l he came to Bureau county and purchased 



eighty acres of land in Macon township, whe.-eon 
he made his home until his death. His wife, also 
a native of the Keystone state, died in Illinois at 
the age of about forty-five years. Both were faith- 
ful 2nendjers of tlie Church of God, and Mr. Carper 
gave his political support to the whig party until 
the organization of the new republican party, 
when he joined its ranlcs and continued to follow 
its banners until his demise. In the family of 
this worthy couple were nine children, of whom 
six are yet living: Jacob S., a resident farmer 
of Bureau county; Heury, who follows farming 
in Clay county, Nebraska; Adam and Frederick, 
who are prosperous agriculturists of Macon to\^'n- 
ship; Christina, the wife of John Ilanley, of 
Buda; and John, a merchant of Buda. One 
daughter, Elizabeth, became the wife of David 
Yount, of Macon township, and died May 22, 
1901, while Christopher, who was a farmer of 
Macon township, died April IG, 1902. 

Adam Carper was reared in Pennsylvania to the 
age of sixteen years and acquired a common school 
education. Although his privileges in youth were 
somewhat meager, he has kept in touch ^vith the 
progress of the times through reading and ob- 
servation, and is now a well infonned man. He 
was early trained to the work of the fann, and 
lessons of industry and integrity were instilled 
into his mind, and in later years have borne rich 
fruit. He came with his parents to Bureau coun- 
ty when a young lad and assisted in the cultiva- 
tion and improvement of the home farm until 
thirty-two years of age, also spending abou: twelve 
years of that time as a thresher in Maeon and 
surrounding townships. The first tract of land 
which he purchased comprised eighty acres on 
section 2S, Macon township, which constitutes a 
part of his present farm. He was able :o make 
only a partial pa}inent, but he worked persistently 
and energetically and soon was able to discharge 
his financial obligations. He also nunle good 
improvements and eventually extended tl.e bound- 
aries of his place by an additional purchase of 
eighty acres. He now has an excellent tract of 
land, covering a quarter section in Macon town- 
ship, and the place is well named Pleasant View 
farm. It is equipped with good buildings, includ- 
ing a very pleasant residence, which he erected, 
together with all the other accessories of a model 
farm of the twentieth century. 

On the ISth of November, 1869, was ceyrbrated 
the marriage of Adam Carper and ^li-s ilary 
Kegarice, a native of Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania, born :March IS, 1S4G, and the s"venth in 
a family of eleven children, whose parents were 
John and Margaret (Inscho) Kegarice. Of this 
family seven are now living. Jacob, who was a 
retired farmer of Scranton, Iowa, died August 15, 
190G. The others are: Philip, a mason by trade, 
who resides at Payton, Iowa; Barbara," widow 
of Robert Spencer, of Peoria; Mrs. Carper, wife 
of our subject: Sallie, wife of E^ra OsVorne. a 



6i(; 



FAST AXJJ TKKSEXT UF J'.LIM-AL" fUL^VJ'V 



furua-r of Ciwtuii, loua; iiargaict, wife of \\'il- 
liaiu Suter, of West Viri,'iuia; Susan, wife of 
George Ernie, a farmer of IJelwoofl, Fennsylvania; 
Kauey, wife of I. M. Eoberts, a grain dealer of 
Douglas, Xcbraska. John Kcgarice was a native 
of Pemisylvania, boru December 10, 1811, and 
died August 30, ISTS. He was a blacksmith by 
trade, and although receiving but a common school 
education, engaged in teaching. He was a member 
of the Seventh Day Advcntists, and iiolitically was 
a stanch republican, but originally was an old-line 
whig. Mrs. Kegarice was a native of New Jersey, 
born June 20, 1S13, and died October 16, 1882. 
She was reared in Pennsylvania, and was also a 
member of the Sevcntli Day Adventists. After 
the deatli of her husband she came west and made 
her home witli her daughter, Mrs. Carper. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Carper were bom seven 
children, of whom four survive. Myrtle is now 
the wife of Eichard W. Eobinson, a prosperous 
farmer of ilacon township, and their children are 
Hairy J., Mary Eose, Mildred and Myrtie Dell. 
Mr. Eobinson is a native of Illinois, was educated 
in the common schools of Macon township and 
also pursued a business course in Davenport, Iowa. 
Politically he is a democrat, and is a member of 
the Church of God. John Irving is a graduate 
of BarkevviUe Academy, of Pennsylvania, of the 
class of 1893, and of Fiudlay College, Ohio, of 
the class of 1896. ■ In one year he completed a 
course in Barkeyville Academy, which usually re- 
quires two years, and in two years at Findlay Col- 
lege he completed the work that usually required 
three years. He is now engaged in the real estate 
business in Des iloines, Iowa, and was married 
August 10, 1898, to Alma Markee, and they have 
two children, Gerald and Dorothy. Josie, born 
September 27, 1876, was married Xovember 30, 
1899, to Bert Bartlett, and they have two chil- 
dren: Clarence Adam and Mary Darline. The 
other members of the Carper family were Mar- 
garet, Ira, Jacob Elmer and one who died in 
infancy. 

Age conferred upon Mr. Carper the right of 
franchise at the time when Abraham Lincoln was 
a candidate for the presidency, and to him Mr. 
Carper gave his support. He has always been a 
stalwart republican, and has been a delegate to 
various county conveutious, where his opinions 
have frequently been a decisive factor in party 
councils. His wife adheres to the faith of the 
Church of God, her membership being in what 
is known as the Bunker Hill church. In various 
church activities she is deeply interested, is a 
member of the Ladies' Foreign Missionary So- 
ciety and for some years was an earnest worker 
in the Sunday school. The family home is an 
attractive and hospitable residence, situated in the 
midst of a fine farm, which is the visible evidence 
of ilr. Carper's life of intense and well directed 
activity. He started out for himself empty- 
handed, but has steadily and por.= istent!y worked 



his way upward, uvercdiiiiug all obstacles and dif- 
liculties in his path. Determination and honor- 
able purpose \\ill always win suecess, and Mr. 
Carper has made for himself an honorable nanit; 
as well as a coinfortable competence as the years 
have ffone bv. 



THOMl'SOX A. ZIXK. 

Thompson A. Ziidx, who for more than two 
decades conducted a meat market in Buda, and is 
numbered among the reliable and enterprising 
business men of that town, was boru September 
15. IS.'iO, his parents being George and Catherine 
(Thcmpson) Zink, natives of Pennsylvania. On 
leaving ihe Keystone state the father removed to 
Ohio and thence come to Illinois in 1843, and the 
motlier in 184-J. They were fanning people, and 
were among the early pioneer residents of this part 
of the state, which they aided in reclaiming for the 
purposes of civilization. 

Thompson A. Zink was reared under the parent- 
al roof, amid frontier conditions, and at the usual 
age began his education, passing through suc- 
cessive grades until he was graduaied from the 
high school of Buda. His training at farm v/ork 
was not meager, for he early took his place behind 
the plow and assisted in other labor in connection 
with the development and improvement of the 
fields. He continued farming with his father for 
five years after c-:-mpleting his education, and then 
started out in life for himself. Subsequently he 
established a meat market, opening a store at 
Buda in 1S81 and conducting it with constantly 
growing success until December, 190-3. He had a 
very liberal patronage, and derived therefrom a 
gratifying income. He is the owner of a good 
farm of one hundred and si.\ty acres in Macon 
towubhip. which he rents, and in his home place 
in Buda has about twelve acres, ^hereon he is en- 
gaged in the raising of poultry. 

Mr. Zink was married to Miss Maggie Eussell, 
of Buda, a daughter of Arnold and Mary (Stone) 
Eussell, farming people, who removed from Penn- 
sylvania to Illinois in 1861. The marriage of Mr. 
and ^Irs. Zinlc was celebrated !March 15, 1877, and 
has been blessed with three children : Mary IL, 
who is a graduate of the Buda high school ; E'stellc 
'Si., at home; and Gail E.. who was born April 2-i, 
1880, and died April 20, 1SS6. 

Mr. Zink is a man who always has the courage of 
his convictions, and his position upon any matter 
of public moment i: never an equivocal one. In 
politics he is a stalwart republican, and for three 
terms has served as aldeniian of Buda, exercising 
his official prerogatives in support of those meas- 
ures which work for general improvement and 
permanent good. Fraternally he is a !\Iason, and 
has served as pa=t master and as junior warden 
in Buda lodg.-, Xo. 399. A., F. and A. M. His 
r''sidenc.e in this county covers a long period, 



PAST AXD PKESEXT OF BUIMLVU COUNTY. 



Gir 



during wliicli time he has wimossed muuy of tlie 
changes tliat have occurred and tlie transforma- 
tion tliat has talcon 2:)lace as business interests have 
been introduced and as the work of improvement 
has been carried forward, winning for Bureau 
county a foremost position among the leading 
counties of this great comnionweaUh. 



JACOB llAXLEY. 

Jacob Hanlev owns and operates a farm of two 
hundred and seventy-six acres in Macon to^vTi- 
ship and is engaged in tlie raising of black Gallo- 
way cattle. A native of Pennsylvania, he was 
born in Blair county, July 25, lS-14, and acquired 
a public-sciiiDol education in that state. His par- 
ents, Christian C. and Barbara (Snowbarger) 
Hanley, were both nati\es of Blair county, Penn- 
sylvania, where their marriage was celebrated on 
the 1st of September, 1836. " For fifty-nine years 
they traveled life's journey happily together as 
man and wife. The father was born !May 5, ISll, 
and the mother was born in June, 18-23. His life 
was devoted to agricultural pursuits and for many 
years he served as supervisor of roads, doing much 
to improve the public highways in his locality. 
Both he and his wife were members of the Dun- 
kard church and died in that faith, Mr. Hanley 
passing away in Taylor township, Blair county, 
September 1, 18S5, wdiile his wife survived until 
October 7, 1904. They had become the parents of 
eleven children, of whom seven are now living: 
Christina, the wife of Christ Markey, of Blair 
county, Pennsylvania ; Susan, who is the widow of 
Peter Kurtz and lives in the sam.e county; Mar- 
garet, the wife of Peter Hite, of. Blair county; 
John S., of Buda, Illinois ; Jacob ; Dnvid C, living 
in Blair county, Pennsylvania; and Andrew S., 
whose home is in Blair county. 

No event of special importance occurred to vary 
the routine of farm life for Jacob Hanley in the 
days of his boyhood and youth. He worked in the 
fields when not occupied with the duties of the 
schoolroom and early became familiar %vith the 
methods then in vogue of carrying on the task of 
plowing, planting and harvesting. In 1866 he 
came to Bureau county, Illinois, ami 1871 he be- 
gan farming on his own account. In the fall of 
1871 he purchased eigldy acres of land, to which 
he has since added until he is today the owner of 
two hundred and seventy-six acres of valuable land 
in Jlacon township, of which twenty-three acres 
is covered with timber. In 1899 he built the 
greater part of the residence which he now occu- 
pies, having in that year erected all of the newer 
portion. . He has modern equipments upon his 
plaee that facilitate the work of the fields and 
everything about his farm is in keeping with ideas 
of progressive agriodture. He makes a specialty 
of the raising of black Galloway cattle. 



In early manhood ilr. Hanley responded to the 
country's call for military aid and on the 13th 
of February, ]Sij3, joined Company B of the One 
Hundred and Xinety-seeond Eegimeut of Penn- 
sylvania Yoluniccrs, to serve for a year or during 
tiie war. He was at the front until August 24, 
1865, when he received an honorable discharge. 

On Christmas day of 1873 he was married to 
Miss Catharine Horton, who was born in Bedford 
county, Pennsylvania, August 31, 1817, a daughter 
of Eli and Mary (Hamilton) Horton, who were 
likewise natives of the same county, the former 
born April 14, 18.-M, and the latter December 23, 
18-33. On the 4th of Xovember, 1854, Mr. Horton 
came to Illinois, settling in Macon township, 
where he first farmed forty acres of land, living 
in a log cabin. ^He was one of the earliest settlers 
of i\Iacon township and aided in reclaiming the 
wild land for the uses of civilization. Later he 
bought more land from time to time and built a 
frame house, in which he and his wife spent their 
remaining days, his attention being successfully 
given to general farming. He served as a school 
director for a number of years and he stood for 
general progrr>> and improvement along many 
lines. He held membership in Buda lodge, 
A. F. & A. if., and he also belonged to the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church, of which his wife was a 
member. He voted with the whig party until its 
dissolution and then joined the ranks of the re- 
publican party, on whose ticket he was elected 
road commissioner, while for a considerable period 
he served as school director. He passed away 
April 34,. 1894, and was survived bv his wife until 
the 15th of February, 1S9S. They had a family 
of eight children, of whom five are yet living: 
^Iis. Hanley; Allen, of Princeton; Thomas, of 
Wyanet township ; Lavica, the wife of Jefferson 
Osboru, of Clav countv, Nebraska : and Charity 
B., the wifi of' 1 let Couch, of Keith county, Xc- 
braska. 

By their marriage ^Ir. and Mrs. Hanley have 
become the parents of five children, of whom four 
still survive: Eva May, born in April. 1876; 
William E., February 8, 1878; Chester G.', March 
4, 1880 ; and Lena E., born March 3, 18S4. 

In connection with his other business interests 
;\[r. Hanley is one of the directors of the Xeponset 
and Macon tov.nships Farmers' Insurance Com- 
pany, with which he has thus been associated for 
the past twenty years. He has served as school 
rlirector for the past eighteen years and for six 
years has been road commissioner, filling the posi- 
tion at the present time. No public trust reposed 
in him has ever been betrayed in the slightest de- 
gree. On tlie contrary he is true to all his duties 
and obligations of citizenship as well as of private 
life. He belongs to Buda lodge, Xo. 575, I. 0. 
0. F., and to Emory post, No." 193, G. A. E., of 
Buda, and through the latter he maintains pleas- 
ant relations with his old army comrades. Such 
is the life historv of Jacob Hanlev. a man secure 



CIS 



PAST AND riiKSJvXT OF BfliEAU COUXTY. 



ill the csteeiii of liia fellowmcn by reason of tin: 
many excellent traits which lie has disphiyed anc 
by his devotion to a liigli standard of ininciples 



BENJAMIN LOl^D SMITH. 

Benjamin Lord Smith, deceased, was one of 
the first settlers of Princeton, locating hero in 1835 
when there were but seven houses in the town. 
He was one of the first merchants and he also 
held county ollices. From tliat time to the present 
the family has figured prominently in the public 
life of the county and the son, Sclby L. Smith, is 
now president of the largest bank in Princeton. 
The name in this locality has become synonymous 
with- commercial integrity and progress, and no 
history of the community would be complete with- 
out mention of him whose name introduces this 
review and who in pioneer days aided in laying 
broad and deep the foundation for the present 
upbuilding and prosperity of the county. He was 
born on a farm near Utica. Xew York, September 
15, ISOG. His father, Benjamin Smith, first 
wedded Abigail Piatt, who died in the state of 
ISiew Y'ork on the ^Oth of June, 1S05. He after- 
ward wedded Abigail Cooper Lord, likewise a na- 
ti%'e of the Empire state. Benjamin Smith was 
born in that state, July IS, 1769, and throughout 
his business career carried on farming, continuing 
in that occupation up to the time of his death, 
which occurred July 11, 1816, while his second 
wife survived until May 1, 1833. 

Benjamin L. Smith, a son of the second mar- 
riage, was reared to general agricultural pursuits, 
assisting in the work of the home farm when not 
occupied with the duties of the schoolroom. He 
pursued his education in the country schools near 
Utica and the fact that he was in poor health in 
his boyhood days induced him to come to the west. 
He remained at home, however, until after his 
marriage, which was celebrated on the loth of 
September, 1S3G, Miss Catherine Seeley becoming 
his wife. She, too, was a native of Xew York, 
born March 26, 1816. Her parents were also 
farming people and both died in the east. Four 
children were born unto ilr. and Mrs. Smith. 
Caroline L., who was born April T, 1839, died Au- 
gust 13, 1813. Laura Ann, born February 25, 
1812, remained at home with her parents and 
cared for them in their old age. She still resides 
in Princeton and owns one of the fine residences of 
the city, which she recently erected at Xo. 30 East 
Peru street. X^athan, born August 5, 1843, died 
February 26, 18 IL Selby L., born December 15, 
1847, is president of the" State Bank of Prince- 
ton and is represented elsewhere in this work. 

On account of the condition of his health Mr. 
Smith, on the day succeeding his marriage, started 
westward, covering the broad e.vpanse of country 
between X"ew York and the ^lississippi valley in 
n wagon. They were four weeks upon the road, 



after wliieh Mr. Sniitli vi.site.l several of the cent- 
ral states and finally cho.-AC Princeton, Illinois, as 
a favorable location, taking up his abode here in 
the fall of 1S35. Soon afterward he established a 
dry-goods store, whicli he conducted for a few 
years, and then purchased a farm a sliort distance 
east of Princeton. He gave his time and energies 
to general agricultural pursuits for several years 
but he found the arduous duties of farm life too 
great a drain upon his health and energy and 
again took up his abode in the city. Soon after- 
ward he was elected county clerk of Bureau coun- 
ty and held that office for eight years, discharging 
his duties in a most promj't and capable manner. 
He then retired from active business life, spending 
his remaining days in Princeton, his death occur- 
ring August 23, 1900, when he had reached tlic 
venerable age of ninety-four years and eleven 
months. His wife passed away July 10, 1904, at 
the age of eighty-eight years. They had traveled 
life's journey together for the remarkable period 
of sixty-five years, sharing with each other in tlie 
joys and sorrows, the adversity and prosperity 
which checker the careers of all. 

In politics ilr. Smith was a stanch democrat, 
thoroughly in sympathy with the principles and 
policy of 'the party. By investing his money in 
town and country property in the early days when 
prices wore low he became very well-to-do owing 
to the appreciation of land and real-estate values. 
He possessed broad business judgment and keen 
discrimination, as was indicated by the judicious 
placing of his investments, which in course of 
years made him one of the most substantial resi- 
dents of Princeton and Bureau county. He was, 
moreover, a man of high ideals as exemplified in 
his straightforv,-ard business career as well as in 
his relat'ions with his fellowmen, and wherever 
known he was held in the highest esteem. As a 
pioneer resident and representative citizen he was 
widely and favorably known in the county and 
his name should be' inscribed among those who 
were the founders and promoters of her best inter- 
ests in an early day. 



MELCHEPT I). GAETEX. 

Melchert D. Garten, an enterprising fanner of 
Ohio township, where he owns thirty-two and 
seventeen hundredths acres of land, situated on 
section 25, was born in that township, ilarch 18, 
1864. He is a son of Azariah D. and Emily F. 
(Browning) Garten, the former born in 1830, and 
the latter in 1S33, both natives of Indiana, whence 
they removed to Illinois in tiro early '50s, being 
among the first settlors of Bureau county. In 
their family were born seven children, of whom 
the subject'of this review is the fifth in order of 
birth. 

]ilelchert D. GartfU received a common-school 
education, and after putting aside his texl-boolcs, 



;^.-V rf. ^...}f- 



PAST AX J) 



IKXT OF J'.LIJHAr Cor.N'iA- 



G-2:: 



started out in life on lii.s own arcoimt. He now 
owns and operates thirty-two and seventeen luin- 
dredtlis acres of land, situated on section 25, Ohio 
townsliip, vhich is a valuaUIu tract, being today 
worth fi'oni one hundivd and fifty to two hundred 
dolhirs per acre. He inlieritod some of this prop- 
erty, but by hard work and good inanagenient has 
added to and improved liis property until he has 
made it an excellent piece of land, on which he is 
carrying on general agricultural pursuits, annually 
harvesting crops, for he is thoroughy familiar with 
the best methods of cultivating the soil and caring 
for the crops. His wife also inherited a tract of 
forty acres, situated on section 2, Ohio township, 
so that together tlicv have a good farm property. 

On the 1st of Feljruary, 1S94, ilr. Garten was 
united in nfarriage to Miss ETuma S. Compton, 
who was born in October, 1873, a daugliter of 
David and Sophia Compton, both natives of Ohio, 
whence they removed to Illinois, settling in Bureau 
county at an early day. ;\Irs. Garten was reared 
and educated in tins county and i.s the yoamgest of 
the five children born unto IMr. and Mrs. David 
Compton. [Mrs. Garten is an excellent lady, pos- 
sessing many sterling traits of clurracter, and by 
the careful management of the household afl'airs 
has proved to her Inisband an able assistant. 

In his political views Mr. Garten is a repub- 
lican, but is not active in the work of the party, 
although he is conversant with the political issues 
of the day. He and his wife liold membership in 
the [Methodist Protestant church at Ohio. .Al- 
though they have come into jjossession of some of 
their property through inheritance, they have dis- 
pla_vecl marked ability, in the management of their 
bnsines,s afl'airs so that they have been enabled to 
add to their interests from time to time and are 
thus meeting with gratifying and merited success. 
They are highly respected young people and the 
hospitality of the be=t homes in the county is 
cordiallv extendeil to them. 



ja:\[ES j. moi;ax, :m. d. 

Dr. James J. [Moran, one of the younger and 
more successful members of the medical fraternity 
practicing in Spring Vallo}', was born in Scotland, 
July 2, lSr.5. His father, Patrick :\[cran, was 
also a native of that country, but was born of 
Irish parentage. He wedded Miss Mary ]Mc- 
Manus, likewise a native of Scotland, and in the 
year ISSl he brought his familv to the United 
States, settling first in Braidwood, Illinois. He 
was a miner and followed that pursuit in his new- 
location. In 1SS6 he left Braidwood and cjme to 
Spring Valley, tlien a recently founded town, and 
again he encased in mining. He still reside^ in 
Spring Valleyr 

Dr. ^[oran was only about six years of age at 
the time of the emigration of the family to the 
new world, and his education begun in the schools 



Spring A'alley, from wliiclr lie was graduated in 
the class of 1S91. For several years "thereafter he 
engaged in teaching school in tliis county, at 
Spring Valley and ilarquette, but regarded this 
merely as an initial step to otlier professional 
labor, for it was his desire to become a member of 
the medical fraternity and while teaching he de- 
voted mucli time, outside of the schoolroom, to the 
study of medicine. In 1900 he entered the Xortli- 
we.steni University at Chicago, as a student in 
tlie medical department, irom which he was gradu- 
ated with the class of ]90.3. He then located for 
practice in Spring Valley, where he has already 
met with very flattering success, having a practice 
that many an older physician might w-ell envy. 

In 1899 Dr. ]\loran was united in nuirriage to 
iliss Aura H. Bari'owman, a daughter of Thomas 
Barrowmau, of Will county, Illinois. They now 
have two sons: Thomas L., born March 13, 1900; 
and James IL, born March 10, 1903. Dr. Moran 
belongs to the ifodcrji \Voodmen camp and other 
societies and is a member of the Eoman Catholic 
church. He has a bright futui'c for he is attentive 
to the duties of his profession, has comprehensive 
Iviiowledge of the principles which underlie active 
]ii-actice and is unusually correct in the diagnosis 
of a case, iloreover, lie is personally popular and 
luis many warm friends in Spring 'Vallev, where 
the greater part of his life has been passed. 



HARRY C. BOOTH. 

Harry C. Booth, supcrinteudeut and treasurer 
of the Illinois Third Vein Coal Company, oper- 
ating at Ladd, has for a number of years been con- 
nected with the development of tlie coal fields of 
Bureau county — one of its leading sources o^f 
wealth. He was born in Xewaric, Xew Jersey, 
Ajiril 10, 1SG4. His paternal grandfather, George 
Booth, still lives in Xew Jersey, at the advanced 
age of ninety-four years, and is a reprcsentati^e of 
an old family of English descent that was founded 
in America in 1607. His son, George C. Booth, 
al«o a native of Xew .Jersey, married Charlotte 
Curtis, a native of X'ew York. Both are at present 
living. 

In the public schools of his native city Harry 
C. Booth began his education, and later continued 
his studies in Bryant iS: Stratton Business College, 
in Xewark. He entered upon his business career 
in connection with clerical and office work in Xew 
York city, and at the age of eighteen years went 
upon the road as a traveling salesman, being thus 
engaged for a number of years. Each change 
which he made was a step in advance, bringing 
liim a broader outlook in the business world and 
greater opportunities. At length he became con- 
nected with the Spring Valley Coal Compan}', and 
he worked his way steadily upward beginning with 
thi' very humble wage of a dollar an.l fortv cents 



65 



PAST ANJ) l"i;KSEXT UF IJL'JIEAU CUUM'V, 



per day. Gradually ho was aJvaiiceJ from oue 
positiou to auotlier uiiLil lie became sales agent for 
the company, oue of the iiiost iniportant positions 
to be fdled in connection with the conduct of its 
business. When tlie Illinois Tliird Vein Coal 
Company was organized, August 2C, 1901, he came 
to Ladd as superintendent and treasurer, which 
constitutes his present connection therewith, and 
in the performance of his duties in this capacity 
ho has contributed in no small measure to the 
success of the enterprise. 

In November, 1S94, ilr. Booth was united in 
marriage to Miss Jennie L. Davies, a native of 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and thev have one son, 
Harold, born February 8, 1S97. Mr. pjooth is a 
n^embcr of the Masonic lodge at Spring Valley and 
the.ehapter at Peru. lie is a member of the Con- 
gregational church, and has taken a most active 
and helpful interest in the cause of education, 
serving now as president of the board of education 
of Ladd, while his efforts have been potent ele- 
ments for advancement along material, political 
and moral lines in Ladd. 



HEXPtA' W. DIMKE. 

Henry W. Immke is one of the oldest pho- 
togi'aphers of Bureau county, located on North 
Main street in Princeton, where he has a large 
and splendidly equipped studio, scarcely surpassed 
in its appointments in the state. He has been in 
business in Princeton since 1SG6 and has been 
located in the northern part of the city since 
1867. His capability as well as the years of his 
continuous connection with the photographic in- 
terests place him foremost among the representa- 
tives of the art and he today enjoys 'much more 
than local reputation. 

ilr. Immke was born in the province of Hessen, 
Germany, in the village of 'Wendershausen, March 
9, 1839," his parents being John and K. Christina 
(Apel) Immke. The paternal grandparents were 
John Henry and Anna K. (Yaeger) Immke. The 
father was an expert weaver of damask linen, pos- 
sessing skill of such superior order that he was 
employed only by wealthy people. He was born 
January 7, 1811, and died in 1818, at the com- 
paratively early age of thirty-six years. Both he 
and his wife were members of the German Re- 
formed church. Mrs. Immke was born January 
28, 1818, and died in Waake in the province of 
Hanover, near Gottingen, Germany, March 31, 
1896, at the age of seventy-eiglit years. Henry 
W. Immke is the eldest of their five children, the 
others being as follows: Maggie, the wife of 
William Blume, who resides near Worthington, 
Minnesota; Henry, who is living near Pontiac, 
Livingston countv, Illinois; ;Marv, the wiriow of 
Fred Wislluiff, who foHouvd farniin- near Chats- 
worth. Lixingslon counf\-: and M. Elizaln-tli, who 



died at Odell, Livingston county, in 1873, at the 
age of twenl3--four years. 

In the schools of his native land Henry W. 
ImndvC acquired a good education and in is55, at 
the age of sixteen years, he crossed the Atlantic 
to America, inaking his way direct to Peru, Illi- 
nois, where for eight years he was employed as a 
farm hand. Feeling that he might enjoy better 
business opportunities in other fields of labor he 
took up the study of photography under the late 
S. M. Fassett, of Chicago, who had one of the 
largest and best equipped galleries in the United 
States during the period of tlie Civil war. Under 
his direction Mr. Immke learned the business and 
in September, 186C, he located in Princeton, 
where he purchased an interest in the gallery of 
"W. H. Masters and has since been identified with 
photography in this city. The partnership con- 
tinued for about five and a half months, when it 
was dissolved, Mr. Immke establishing his studio 
in the north end of Princeton, while Mr. Masters 
remained in the south end. Mr. Immke has since 
been successfully engaged in business, doing all 
kinds of work along his line. He is an artist of 
more than ordinary ability, of which fact incon- 
trovertible proof is given in his pictures. A few- 
years ago he photographed a group of old settlers 
in which are over four hundred faces in a frame 
forty-four by fifty-six inches. As a work of art 
this is an interesting study, being a faithful like- 
ness of those honored pioneers who came to Bu- 
reau county when it was little more than wilder- 
ness. The picture, too, plainly indicates that it 
was executed by a master hand and 3Ir. Immke 
deserves great commendation, not only for the ex- 
cellency of this work, but more for tlie enterprise 
and generous public spirit with which he per- 
formed this difficult utidertaking. He keeps in- 
formed concerning tlie latest processes which have 
improved and revolutionized the methods of pho- 
tography and is not only thoroughly versed in the 
technical side of his art, but also has the keenest 
appreciation for eflFects of light, shade and color 
as well as pose. His work is" certainly of a most 
artistic nature and has gained for him a liberal 
patronage, which places him among the leading 
photographers of this part of the state. 

On the 29th of :May, 18G4, Mr. Immke was 
united in marriage to Miss iMary E. Steinbrook, 
who was born in JMuskingum countv, Ohio, July 
13, 1813. Her father, Henry Steinbrook, was 
born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, October 
1, 179G, but in his v^uth was taken by his parents 
to Muskingum county, Ohio, where he afterward 
engaged in farming and later gave his attention 
to the manufacturing of salt and to coal mining. 
He was, however, a wheelwright by ti'ade. In 
1821 he married Sarah Leffler, who was born Jan- 
uary 28, ISOG, and died in Ajiril. 1892, while his 
death oronrred IMay -1, 1S73. Fourteen children 
were born to them, of whom tl;ree died in in- 
faru-y. Tl,,. „tbers were: Sainnel. Henry, Sarah, 






y"\,- /•• 



fjgam/iiiii 




':;:.U 



I -f 



-^'^^•-^11!! 



PAST AND 1"J;ESI'XT OF r.UKEAU CUINTY. 



Qr, 



Catherine, Pctei-, Cair.linc, .Mai-arct, Anna, Eliza- 
beth, ilary P., George and ilatil.la. Mv. and 
Mrs. Imnike became the parents oC four children, 
of whom two are living. Ifenry William Imnikc, 
Jr., born :Mareh 20, 1805, married Martha S. 
Slaven:?, of Kansas City, Missouri, a daughter of 
Judge L. C. Slavens. They had two children: 
Willianr Lnthor; and [Martha", who died at the age 
of fo\ir months. Henry W. Imnd^e, Jr., is con- 
nceted with the firm of Ilaskins & Sells, of New 
York city, as public acconntaut. 1\. ]\[inetta 
Immke, born January 2-t, ISGT, is now the wife of 
Fred 11. Bacon, of" Canton, South Dakota, by 
whom she had four children: Neva, Amelia, 
Freda and Alberta, but the last named is now 
deceased. .Pansy M. Immke, born January 13, 
187-5, becaiiTo the wife of Walter A. Williamson. 
who is in the employ of the large grocery house 
of P.eid, ]Murdock &" Co., of Chi'eago. She died 
February IS. 1905, leaving one daughter, Mary 
Immke. LePoy S., born April 2, ISSl, died 
March G, 1S1J3." 

JTr. Immke has always been deeply interested in 
educational affairs and has done eft'eetivo service 
in behalf of public instruction while serving as a 
member of the school board. Both he and his 
wife are earnest members of the Presbyterian 
church, contribute generously to its support and 
take an active and helpful interest in its work. 
Mr. Immke has never liad occasion to regret his 
determination to seek a home in the United States, 
for in the new world he has found the business 
opportunities he has sought and has won succes-, 
by his thorough understanding of the business 
which claims his attention, by his close applica- 
tion and reliable methods. He has also made 
steady advancement in his art and hi? position is 
not only that of financial sucees-s, but of artistic 
prominence as well. 



on an indei'.'U.kuL lickri in I'J'JL -Vaothfr brutluT 
is living iu Xans is Cil\, Missouii, and tv.o sisler.s 
are residents of Minnesota, the family thus being 
widely scattered. 

Theodore J. Bergc was largely reared in tliis 
county, whither he accompanied his parents on 
their removal from Tazewell county in his boyhood 
days. The public schools aflorded him his educa- 
tional privileges, and he early became familiar 
with the occupation of fanning, which he has fol- 
lowed to the present time, now owning and op- 
erating a well improved tract of land of two hun- 
dred and eighty acres on sections jG and 17, Fair- 
field township, and also owns property in Minne- 
sota and Kaii;as. He carries on general farm 
work and stock-raising, and his close application 
and unremitting diligence constitute the salient 
features in Jiis success. 

Mr. Berge was married in this ccunty to Miss 
Sabine E. Salzman, a native of Gernisny, and 
they now have four children, all of whom were 
born in Fairfield township, namely: Olga, Emma, 
Kegina and Eudo'ph. In his political views Mr. 
Berge is independent, keeping well informed on 
the questions and issues of the dav, and not con- 
sidering himself' bound by party ties. He has 
served for sixteen years as a collector, and is now 
school treasurer, and the public -luties thus de- 
volving upon him have been discharged with 
promptness and fidelity. Fraternally he is con- 
nected with the Mudern "U'oodmen of America at 
Yorktown, and his religious views are indicated 
by his membership in the Lutheran church. 



THEODOPE J. BERGE. 
Theodore J. Berge, a farmer and stock-raiser, 
living on section 17, Fairfield township, was born 
in Tazewell county, Illinois, in 1SG3, and is a son 
of Ajidrew Berge, who now owns and occupies a 
farm in Fairfield township. The father was born 
in Hesseii Cassel, Germany, and came to America 
in ISGl. He made his way westward to Peoria by 
boat and located in Tazewell county, Illinois, where 
he resided continuously until his" removal to Bu- 
reau county. His wife, who bore the maiden name 
of Mary ifuensterman, was also born in Hessen 
Cassel, Germany, and they have now reached the 
ages of sixty-eight and si.xty-four years, respective- 
ly. In their famiU were nine children, of whom 
Theodore J. Berge is the eldest. Three brothers 
now reside in Lincoln, Nebraska, two of whom are 
lawyers, while one is engaged lu the real estate 
business. G. W. Berge, who is a member of the 
bar there, was a car.didate for governor of the state 



JOHN G. ANDEPSON. 

Among the citizens of foreign birth living in 
Bureau county is numbered John G. Anderson, a 
native of Sweden. lie first oi)euel Ins eyes to the 
light of day on the 17th of March, 1SC3", and is a 
son of Swan and Sarah (Johnson) Ander;on, both 
of whom were natives of Sweden, in which country 
they were married in October, IS-JS. The year 
1866 witnessed their arrival in Illinois, at which 
time they took up their abode in Princeton. Mr. 
Anderson worked^ at farming and railroading, 
continuing a resident of the county seat up to the 
time of his death, which occurred February 15, 
18G7, at the age of thirty-three years The mother 
of our subject is now living in Buda in her sixty- 
seventh year, liavinc been born ilny 3, 1S39. By 
her first"' marriage she had five children, but only 
two are now living, the elder being Matilda J., 
who was born [March 2-5, 18G0, and is the wife of 
Herman laindgren Having lost her first hus- 
band, Mrs. Anderson was married to Samuel A. 
Johnson, who was born in Sweden and died Febru- 
ary 26, 1000, at the age of sixty-five years There 
were six children by that marriage, of whom four 
survive, namely: Hilrna, Nellie, Ida and Minnie. 
The parents were members of the Congregational 



G->> 



PAST AXJ) ri!j;SF,\T OF J!L' 



AT COIX'J'V 



churcli, aud for thirt}-t\vo ycara ^[;-. Johiisou was 
in the employ oi' the Chicago, Burlington v.'^: Quiaey 
Eailroad Company, acting as section boss for lu'cu- 
ty-t\vo years. 

John G. Anderson was only thrse years old when 
brought by liis parents to Bureau county, Illinois, 
and he attended the public schools until ten years 
of age, when he began earning his own living by 
working in a grist and planing mill at Galva, 
where he remained for about three years. He then 
secured employmetrt as a farm hand during the 
summer aud attended school during the winter 
months, being imis engaged until twenty yeai's of 
age, with the exception of a period of a year and 
a half, which was passed in the Hoxton steam- 
heating works at Ivewance. Re began farming on 
his own account about the time he attained his 
majority, aud when his labor and economy had 
brought him suffic'ent capital he bought seventy- 
five acres of land lu ilacou townsb'p. He is now 
cultivating one hundred and fifty acres of excel- 
lent farming land near I>ud;i, ai'd derives there- 
from a desirable inioi"" 

On Christmas day of ISSO Jlr. Anderson was 
married to Miss Auuie E. Crismau, ^^ho was boru 
in Macon township, July 23, 1SG5, a daughter of 
William and Elizabeth Crisman. Mr. aud Mrs. 
Anderson now have two children: l^ath E., born 
April 23, 1893, and William C, .A.pril 23, 1903. 
The parents are members of the Baptist church, 
and politically Mr. Anderson is a republican. Al- 
most his entire life has been passed in this county, 
and the success he has achieved has come as the 
direct reward of his own labors. Starting out for 
himself when on^' ten years of ago, he has been 
the architect and builder of his own forttines, and 
deserves much credit fi^r what he has accomplished. 



MICHAEL in' AX. 
Michael L'yan, to whom has been vouchsafed a 
well earned retirement from active business life, is 
now living in Shefl'icld, where he has remained for 
a number of years, having put aside the more ar- 
duous duties of a business career. He ^^■as born 
in the village of Gloucester, King's county, Ire- 
land, on the l-5ta of August, 1819, and was reaied 
to farm life, remaining at home with his parents 
until thirty-two years of ago. On crossing the 
Atlantic to America iu 1S-")1 he joined his brother, 
thea living in Scher.ectady, Xew York, an-l he first 
earned his living in the new world by vrcrking in a 
brickyard at nine shillings per day. Ho managed 
to save a little money, but his first wages were sent 
home to his mother, and he later T)aid the passage 
of a niece from Ireiand to X'ew York. For a year 
he was employed in an engine manufa'-tory at a 
wage of a dollar per day, and the succC'ding two 
years were devoted to railroad work in Ohio, after 
which ho returned to Schenectady. X'ew York, 
where he was employed at general labor for twenty 



dollars per month l.y a firm engaged iu the lumber, 
coal and hardware business. For seven years he 
reiiuuncd in that f-mplo}-— a fact which indicatr^s 
that he was faithCul to the duties iiitrusted to him 
aud was tlioroiighly reliable at all times. 

On the 22d of Fibruary, IS-dG, Mr. Kyan wedded 
Miss Catherine O'llare, a native of County Down, 
Ireland, who was brought to the United States 
when ten years of fge. They have one son, Wil- 
liam. In ISCO Mr. liyan came to illinois making 
his way to Princet-n, where resided his wife's sis° 
ter. To provide for the support of his family he 
worked at farm labor until 1SG2, and then, puttin<T 
aside all business and personal c:.nsideration, he 
joined the army iu defense of t'le Union cause, 
enlisting on the 3d of August of that year as a' 
member of Company I, Ninety-third lUiuois \'ol- 
unteer Infantry, under Colonel Putnam of Free- 
port, Illinois. He remained in the service until 
hono]-ably mustered out, August 2G, 1865. With 
his company he tool: part in the battles ci Yicks- 
burg, Fort Gibson, Paymond, Jackson and Cham- 
piou Hill. During ihe siege of Yicksburg, which 
lasted six weeks, every day or two he was in the 
rifle pits, and on the 22d of :May was in the charge, 
after which he was on patrol duty. After a thirty 
days' furlough he rejoined his regiment and took 
part iu the battle of Missionary Eidge, where 
Colonel Putnam was killed, and after that en- 
gagement only thirteen men of his company were 
fit for duty. The division then went with Mc- 
Phersou to Iluutsville, Alabama, to guard rail- 
roads, but was ordered back to Chattanooga to 
guard a train on its way to join Sherman In an 
eugagenient at Hail on, Georgia, in July 1S64, his 
knee and back were severely injured from a ball, 
aud he was sent to the field hospital at Chatta- 
nooga. As soon as able for service "he was placed in 
the Yeteran Peser e Corps and did guard dutv at 
the hospital u:itil h"? discharge. He now rece'ives 
a pension, as he has never recoverjd from the in- 
juries sustained at ihe last active engiio;ement in 
which he participated. 

FoUowiug his mditary service Mr. liyaii at once 
made his way to Princeton, and the succeeding 
3-ear took up his abode on a small farm in Manlius 
township, where he still owns one hundred aud 
sixty acres of rich and productive land He also 
has eighty acres '.n Concord township, and his 
farming property is the visible evidence of his life 
of thrift and enterprise. For twenty-sc/en years 
he made his home upon his first purchase, bu"t for 
a long period before leaving the farm he left the 
active work to others, on account of his health. 
He, however, gave personal supervision to its man- 
agement, and liis business affairs were so capably 
conducted that he gained a goodly m-;asure of 
success, and is now in possession of a co-ufortablo 
competence. He resided upon his farm until about 
1892, and erected there a fine residenc-;. In the 
year mentioned. h->wever, ho rcnvived to Ottawa, 
where he purchased property which he still 



PAST 



A>;: 



rJIKSKXT OF iw 



w corxi'v. 



owns. Then he removed from Ottawa to Shcllield, 
whore he and his eitimable wife still reside. They 
are devout members of St. Patrick's Catholic 
church, and have been generous contributors to 
its support. I'olitically Mr. Pyan is a republican, 
and while never an cflioe seeker he has always been 
interested in those questions which affect the wel- 
fare of county, sidte and nation. He has now 
passed the eighty-seventh milestone- on life's jour- 
ney, being tlius one of the venerable citizms of the 
county, and in a review of his record it will be 
found that throughout, the entire period of his 
manhood he has displayed most com.niendable traits 
of character — honesty in business, fidelity in cit- 
izenship and trustworthiness in friendsbip. He 
can therefore look back over the past without re- 
gret, and Ke receives the veneration and respect 
which should tver be accorded to one of his years, 
whose life has been worthily passed. His son 
AVilliam, who manages tlie property, and is at 
home, is also a republican, and a member of the 
Catholic church. 



:\racCLAPF.Y W]-:KIvS, M. 1). 

Dr. :\[acCLn-ey Weeks, a reprejeulative of the 
medical fraternity in Ladd, practicing along mod- 
ern scientific lines, was born in Chicago, I^Iarch 20, 
1871, and is a son cf Charles B. and Irene (Rice) 
Weeks, both of whom were natives of Illinois. The 
father was born in liOckport, and is a lawyer by 
profession. He is now residing in the Indian Ter- 
ritory, but liis wife passed away in lS9-i. 

Dr. Weeks pursued a public school education in 
Kansas, to which state he removed with the family 
in 1878 when a yo''.ith of but seven years. After 
completing a public schi^ol course he pursued the 
study of stenography, and for a num.bc; of years 
was employed as a stenographer in offices in the 
west. Later he took up the study of medicine, and 
was graduated from the Xortbwestern University 
of Chicago, completing the medical course with the 
class of 19i)2. He then located for practice in 
Spring Valley. He had previously gone to that 
place in 189.3, at which time ho entered the employ 
of the Spring Valley Coal Companv as a stenog- 
rapher, ref^iining his connection therewilb until he 
went to Chic. 1:^0 to enter upon preparation for the 
profession in -vhic.'. he is now engaged. Follow- 
ing his graduation he was associated in practice 
with Dr. Frjnklin, of Spring ValLv, for two years, 
and in 1905 he removed to Ladd, where he has 
since remained. Here he has built up a good 
patronage and has demonstrated his ability to suc- 
cessfully cone with the intricate problems which 
continually confront the physician in his efforts to 
check the ravages of disease and restore health. 

Dr. Weeks was married in 1896 to iTiss ilarth.a 
Nelson, a daughter of James Nelson, one of the 
early residents of Bureau county. Tv/o children 
grace this union : Herbert Nelson, born March 



12, 190,2, and Dorothy, born February 1, 1904. 
Dr. and Mrs. Weeks are well known a.ad prom- 
inent socially, and their own homo is the scene of 
many delightful social functions. The Doctor is 
a nicni])er of Dalzell lodge. No. 805, A. F. and 
A. M., at Spring Valley, and is in hearty smu- 
pathyw'ith the principles and tenets of tjic craft. 
His time and attention, however, are given most 
largely to his proCessioiial duties, which he per- 
forms with a sense of conscientious obligation, and 
in his administration of remedial a?encies he ha; 
sliown himself thoroughly famili u'" witli moderj; 
methods of prjcticc. 



CHAPLKS W. FOPDHA.M. 

Charles W. Fordli.im, who for forty-one years 
has been a resident of Walnut tow7iship, and has 
spent his entire life in this county, was born iu 
Wyanet township on the 20th of November, 1S57. 
His parents were Charles and Elizabeth (Morgan) 
Fordham. The father's birth occurred in Cam- 
bridgeshire, England, in December 182-5. and the 
mother was born there on the 13 th of November, 
1829. They became residents of Illinois iu 1856, 
settling in Wyanet township, and the father re- 
mained a resident of Bureau county until called 
to his finad rest, his death occurring in September, 
1902. His widow still survives. 

Charles W. Fordham, was a you^h of eight years 
at the time of th(j removal of the family from 
Wyanet to Walnut township. Througli the sum- 
mer months he aided in the work of the fields on 
the home farm, and in the winter season., pursued 
his education in the public schools. He has always 
carried on general agricultural pursuits, finding 
in that line of life ample opportunity ^or the ex- 
ercise of his native talents and energies. He is 
now the owner of t«'o hundred acres of choice land 
which woidd oomn-imd the highest market price. 
It is situated on sections 21 and 28, Walnut town- 
ship, and constitutes a very valuable farm, which 
Mr. I'ordham has acquireil through hard work and 
good management. 

On the 25th of February, 1877. Mr. Fordham 
was united in marriage to Miss Floi'ence Ferris, 
who was born February 27, 1859 They have be- 
come the parents of two cliildren: Delia B.. born 
March 5, 1878, and Sylvia B., born February 11, 
1880. Mr. Fordham exercises his right of fran- 
chise in sujjport of the men and measures of the 
republican party, and is thoroughly in sympathy 
with its principles and policy. He keeps well in- 
formed on the important issues which divide the 
two great parties, und is thus able to support his 
political position by intelligent arcrumeut. In re- 
ligious belief the family arc orthodox. Mr. Ford- 
ham is a member of the Masonic I"dge, No. 722, 
and also holds membership relations with the ^lod- 
ern Woodmen of America. He ha? been school 
director for a number of years Tnd as.^.esscr for 



PAST 



AXi. VllKSEST Oh- KUKEAU COLXXy 



sevuial years, aii,l juattcis ivlaUa- t,, ilv ,r,,,,,,,,| 
wcllarc and tl.o U].ln„ldii,y of Uie coiuUv mviu' 
his indorsement and eo-operatioi; Hi/liie Ins 
beou diaracterized by unfallorin>^ dili-vnee' uhu'l, 
IS always one of tJie essential eoneoiniUaUs 'r,f .ue 
cess and it has been through this mean, tint e 
mn fmvn'T'"'" "'' '''' ''^'''^^^^^^ ^-^-^nner. of \val- 



to jiin 



anuth 



a.Kl trading these fo^? llm^^'y^k^ni oxen he Un.: 
,,;,'■ -'^■'■^^^ the country to California m Ls^n 
in '1- '"^eantinie, covering a period of si.x or sev^ 



nn ,-. --^^"'^'^iUXi'MulMLVSy. 
llie hte reeord of few men better illustrate. 
he value and .ure rewards of character than doe 
tnat of Anthony Morrasy, who for nuu^ vearl 
was a prominent and honored resident of Sheflirh) 
■Deprived m his youth of many of the ad« m -' 
whicji most people regard as 'essential to si,!- ^.-^ 
in hte, he nevertheless developed his native talents 

ties and b] determined purpose, unfaltering per- 
severance and real strength of character },e worked 

^uJ'^' T^'^^' ''^'''''^' °«''""o simultaneous V 
■ success and an honored name 

ISO, T^ °i ^T\°^- ^^' "''"^' «^' Xovember, 
lS2o and when but eighteen months old was 
brongh to the United State, by lus pare 
.ho set led npon a farm near Baltimore,^ .Va y^ 
and After a few years they removed to Wash- 
ington county, that state, and the father died 
when his son .Anthony was but twelve years of 
age Tliere were six cliildren in the fam Iv, and, 
bov fo,?n r-T'''' ^'''''"'^ circumstances,, the^^onni 
boy found It necessary to seek employment, "which 
famir "urf "'^^ -distant^elative'of th 
tamil\ Af er two years he accompanied his em- 
ployer to Ohio, and when a year had pas' d n 
that state they started for Missouri. After travel 
ing nearly all summer thev found themselves in 
August, 1840, at Peru, Illinois. In 1S41 Mr 
Morrasy not being able to make a definite con^ 
of i-":,'thl"°^'' "''' I"^ employer, tied up all 
Wf H -■ P?!5C-'^^"s m a handkerchief and 

eft the place which to him had become a horn 
to seek employment. After two davs of lonev 

srtaiit\'r ?""^^■^" i^^ ^°^^' ---^' ^- 

and lodging. During the evening and the suc- 
ceeding morning he made himself =o u=efulTn 

DecaniP in crested in him and proposed to emnlov 
Jrni for six months at a wage of six doll^rTner 
-n^K and t,,e succeeding six monlhs'he'ws^to 
hr?' 1 1 u"^ mornings and Saturdays for his 

opposite La Salle and thus he w"d ,' It' . tTer 

vo.u,gcouworthtw..ntv-ro,..d.,n:!:"''V!;:^.:!j,j 



years, he had saved enough money to purcin , 
en acres ol thnber land^nd to inake^a iS 

urK,Hi^°'l ''f'{ r'' '' P— l-'l e 
ip to tins date he had at no time rorelvp.i , 
than fifteen dollars per month "^ '""'' 

Starting for- the Pacific coast, he made the lon.^ 
; H auluous journey across the prairies of the 
uKldle west, over the hot stretches of sand ■ml 

Golde-n state. He was fairly successf-ul in h 
operations on the coa.r and in the year ISV' 
'e returned to Illinois., where he purcliased tw^ 

li^nr-ii^t-^ts^r^^^^ 

short time he returned to his farm in Gofd towr- 
^hip in the year 1854, and for nearly a half 
Snr?-nT'V?"''''''^ "^"^ "^° agricultural de- 
and^ , 1 , T^^ '""^^y- ^^ ^^'^ pvivations 

d ?sof tn 'H'f °^\^°^^Pi°^^^- times, the long 
ance o f' ' °}f *' ^""''"'^ "" '''"'' «ie endu,^ 
ance of storms, cold and heat, tlie fording of un- 
bndged streams, the breaking of the prairies 
these and a hundred other obstacles which Mr! 
S^/i-"'! r*^ overcame, only those who are 
ul y retr '''\'''^"f^' ^^ Gold township can 
ng of budges and schoolhouses, the drainincr of 

of u e burdens and m many of those enterp.-ises 
he wa= an able leader. In a public way\AIr 

of twentv years and represented this district for 
two terms, ISSr and 1SS9, in the house of repre- 
?ion o7t °\?'' ''^'"°=^ legislature. In pS- 
h .nl? T^ ^! ^f'. '''" ^°""^' t° te a man of 
absolute integrity, faithful in hi., duties and un- 

jiSe:^ '" ^'' '^"""*'"" '" "" "^^"=^ ^^ *^"ffi" ''"J 
Mr. Morrasy was married to .Miss Esther A 

t7rS\\'-j't''''- ^''''' ^°""^>-' Ohio; 

f P^ f • l;^'^^- , She was born at that place in 

To ;, J' '^'' • '""- ^°J°-^-'"? goo/health. 

To them three children were born: Robert D. 

vZt-^- ^''r °°'' ^"''^ ^" Dorch.e.ter. Nebraska ; 
shfn o ^ \^^"'T-'' e-^-^^'pervisor of Gold town- 
ship: and :\rary Irene, dec-iased. 

Mr. Morrasy held membersh'ip in the ShcfTlcld 

Lnitarian church and was a constant attendant 
upon Its services until prevented bv the infirmities 
of old age. He was alwav? an ea-er listener and 
was interested m all those things which promofn 
rhe refinements and nobler aspirations In ]S.V-> 
he joined the ifasonic lod-« Yo 1.3 of Xovid' 



PAS'J' AXD rJtKSKXT OF J'.LIiKAU COUN'J'Y. 



G3:J 



Uitv, CalilViruia, ami in 1S.">J diiiiittL'tl tu Aiiie:= 
lodge, -No. ll-J, A. F. & A. .M., uf ShfllR'kl, of 
winch at tlii' tiiiuj of his death he was the oklest 
iiieiiiber. J[e held all of tlie chairs in the order, 
and at all times was au exemplary represeutative 
of the craft. Ectirinj;- from his farm in ISST, 
he became a resident of Shcflield and practically 
spent his remaining days in the enjoyment of a 
well merited rest, the supervision of his property 
interests being largely left to his son F'rank. 

The Bureau County Tribune, speaking of his 
political associations, said: "In the passing of 
Anthon}' Morrasy, democracy lost one of its 
stauchcst friends, advocates and defenders; and 
one who was never at a loss to give reasons for 
the faith tjiat was in him. He was a democrat 
because he" believed the common people are the 
salt of the earth, and the only foundation on which 
a republic can endure. Thrifty and prospei'ous 
himself, he had no toleration for tlie slothful and 
improvident, but lie believed iu a free field ami 
fair opportunities for all. He was most radically 
opposed to special privileges for the rich, and 
therefore to the so-called 'economic system' with 
a high soujiding name, but which instead of pro- 
tection for the American workinginan, is but a 
subterfuge and a method of dicker, barter and 
sale between politicians and wealth, and by 
which the politicians secure the support of wealth 
in return for license to plunder the entire people. 
Mr. Morrasy was a thinker and a man of action, 
and prompt and determined in the execution of 
his purpose. He was a Jaeksonian democrat. 
Party was much more than a mere sentiment to 
him — not the party name or the party organiza- 
tion, but the old democratic creed, as familiar to 
him as his own name, was to him a living princi- 
ple, pointing along the only pathway by which the 
common people had ever obtained liberty and re- 
lief from the insolent exactions of wealtli and the 
oppressions of 'rule by divine right.' He thor- 
oughly believed that 'Eternal vigilance is the price 
of liberty,' and that strict construction and rigid 
adherence to the principles of democracy as taught 
by the fathers of the republic is the only safe 
course for the common people and the only bul- 
wark against the greed of wealth and tlie secret 
plottings of a purse proud aristocracy which dis- 
owns its country to dwell among titles and kneel 
at the foot of a throne. And he would tolerate 
no heresies in even his own well loved party. In 
the old days Mr. Eckels used to say of ^Mr". j\[or- 
rasy, 'that he was one of the most meaty talkers 
he had ever known.' 'Mr. JForrasy was "quite an 
able speaker, and in conversation he had a re- 
markable faculty of saying a great deal in a few 
words — of stating a proposition or expressing an 
opinion tersely, directly and to the point and 
with a peculiar originality all his own. With 
more favorable opportunities and under more be- 
nign conditions during his youth, he would have 
been a man of mark bevond the bounds of his 



euuuty. i'er^oiially, his methods were, yes and 
no. ile would or he w<juldu"t, and you knew 
wliiuli as soon as he decided, llet ween" man and 
man the golden rule wa.s the line he hewed to, 
and he was therefore a good citizen, neighbor, 
luisbaud and father. As well as he loved democ- 
racy ^Jr. ilorrusy lived the last seven years of his 
life and died a man without a party. After a long 
life spent iu active participation in all the efforts 
of democraey he positively refused to countenance 
the free silver movement, and withdrawing from 
the party, mourned as a father over a wayward 
cliild while warmly resenting any intimation that 
he was not a di/in.>ciat." 

Although men dill'erea from Mr. Morrasy in 
opinion, all who knew hiui respected him because 
of his fidelity to his honesi convictions. He had 
the unqualified confidence of those with whom 
he was associated in his business relations and 
his life was actuated by high principles and 
manly purpose. He certainly deserved much 
credit for what he accomplished. He started out 
on his own account peDir!le=s and each forward 
step in his career was the result of careful tliought 
and study concerning the situation and of able 
iise of his opportunities. Such a life record 
should serve as a source of inspiration and en- 
couragement to all who read it. He passed away 
October 2-1, 1003, when almost seventy-eight years 
of age, leaving behind him a valuable estate as 
the visible evidence of a life of thrift and enter- 
prise and also the untarnished name which is 
rather to be chosen than great riches, and today 
upon the roll of P)ureau C'-unty"? honored dead is 
engraved the name of .\n*I;onv ^furrasv. 



CHAPEES E. PEXHEETOX. 

Charles E. Pendleton, a farmer, residing on sec- 
tion 29, Princeton township, was born in this 
county, September 23, 1S39, his parents being 
A. Bj and H. X. (Eoomi?) Pendleton, who were 
natives of Connecticut. The fatlva- was born De- 
cember 29, ISOr, and tlie mother ifay 7, lSl-5. 
They were married October 5, 1S3.3, and in 1838 
came to Bureau county-, Illinois, from Tolland 
county, Connecticut. By trade the father was a 
carpenter, but during the greater part of his resi- 
dence in Bureau county devoted his energies to 
farming, and made substantial progress financially 
in that undertaking. He died June 21, 1879, and 
for a long period was survived by his wife, who 
passed away May 30, ISf-S. They were the par- 
ents of four children, of whom "Miry and Erastus 
died when young, whilo a son and daushter reached 
years of maturity. The latter, Harriet, born 
March 20, 18.51, was married December 2SJ 1871. 
to AV. W. Powell, of Putnam county, and died 
February 2.5, 18SS, at the nge of tliirty-seven years. 

Charles E. Pend'etou. the only =urviving mem- 
ber of the familv, was reared and educated in 



PAST AXD riiKSEXT OP BUREAU COl'X'iT. 



his native county, where he has always resided, 
aud his traiuiut^ at farm labor in his yuutli well 
qualified him to take up the same line of business 
when he roaeliod man's estate. He was associated 
with his fatlicr iu general agricultural pursuits, 
and he is now the owner of one hundred and sixty- 
six acres of laud ia his home farm, besides other 
farming property. In connectioji v/ith the tilling 
of the soil and the production of the crops to which 
it is best adapted, he has always been engaged in 
the stock business, breeding, feeding aud ship- 
ping, and he still handles some stock, both horses 
and cattle. He is watchful of every opportunity 
pointing to success, and manifests keen discrim- 
ination in business .-jffairs, combined with excellent 
executive ability. 

In 1882 was celebrated the marriage of ilr. 
Pendleton and Mrs. Sarah Bennett (nee A'aill), 
who was born in Wethersfield, Illinois, a daughter 
of the Eev. William F. Vaill, deceased, who con- 
tinued in the ministry until his death, which oc- 
curred when he vas about eighty-two years of 
age. Thus was ended a long life of usefulness 
crowned with the honor and respect of his fellow- 
men because of his devotion to the welfare and 
moral advancement of his race. Mr. and Mrs. 
Pendleton have twu children: Porter, living in 
Peoria, Illinois, and H. Grace, at home, and by 
her former marrirge ilrs. Pendleton had a son, 
William D. Bennett, now living in Los .-Vngcles, 
California. 

Mr. Pendleton is a republicau, and the family 
are members of the Congregational chureh^ Their 
home is pleasantly located about two miles south 
of the courthouse in Princeton, and here Mr. Pen- 
dleton is carrying on farming and sto( k-raising 
with good success, his ability and encrgv having 
gained him place with the representative agri- 
culturists of this p '.rt of the state. 



CLAEEXCE H. DELANO. 

Clarence H. Delano, conducting one of the old- 
est established mercantile enterprises of Prince- 
ton, but with a record which fully sustains the rep- 
utation that has always been attach.ed to the fam- 
ily name, was born in Pittsfield, Mnssachusetts, 
and is a son of John H. Delano, pioneer merchant 
of Princeton, represented elsewhere in this work. 
He was an only son, and was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Princeton, to which city his parents 
removed in 1855. On the completion of his edu- 
cation he joined his father iu business as a sales- 
man in the store, and in 1876 was admitted to a 
partnership under the firm style of Delano & Son. 
Under the able management of Clarence H. De- 
lano the business has grown and developed until 
he now carries one of the most select and extensive 
lines of goods iu this section of the state. His 
store is a credit to the city, and is a commercial 
enterprise which contributes to general prosperity 



as well as to indivdual success. He is ah;o a di- 
rector of the Eirst National Bank. 

In ISSG ilr. Delano was married to Miss Lizzie 
McConihc, a daughter of ]j. H. McConihe, of 
Princeton. Four children have been born unto 
them : Martha I., John II., Pobert C. and Isabella 
il. The parents are members of the Methodist 
church and are advocates of all that tends to ad- 
vance material, intellectual and moral progress. 
Mr. Delano is pwisident of the school board and a 
man of many admirable qualities, being genial and 
public spirited as well as progressive, alert and 
enterprising in his business life. He is spoken of 
as "a worthy sou of a worthy sire," and his name 
stands not only as a synouv-m for business suc- 
cess here, btit also for business intewritv. 



JA^IES GRAHAM 

James Graham is now practicallv living retired, 
but still resides upon his farm of two hu.-idred and 
eighty acres, lying on section 2, Fairfiehl town- 
ship. For many years he was identified with farm- 
ing and stock-raising. Ho came to Bureau county 
about 1S50. His birth occurred in Quecis county, 
Ireland, eightv-threo years ago, ani v.Iien a young 
man he crossed the Atlantic to the new world, 
establishing his home in New York, h'ving for 
some years in Ithica. In his native country he 
had learned the business of sorting wool and he was 
thus engaged in Ithica, working in a factory there 
for a number of years. Consideration of the busi- 
ness outlook and the opportunities which he 
thought were before him in the west led him to 
the determination to seek his fortune in the west 
aud accordingly he came to Illinois, settling in 
Bureau couuty. He bought a farm of forty acres 
in Fairfield township, to which he has added until 
it has reached its present acreage. Foi a long 
period he was active in the work of +he fields and 
also successfully engaged in stock-raising and thus 
as the years passed by his fmancial resources grad- 
ually increased and now with a comfortable com- 
petence he is living retired, the fruits of his for- 
mer toil supplying him with all of the comforts 
and many of the luxuries which go to make life 
wortli living. 

Mr. Graham was married in the sta'e of New 
Yo:'k to Miss jlaiy Ann Sterling, who died in 
1901, at the age of about seventy-seven years. She 
was a nr.tivc of nOi'lhern Ireland, born in County 
Antrim. Mr. aud Mrs. Graham became the par- 
ents of three children, two daughters and a son: 
Mrs. Caroline Adams, who is residing in Fair- 
field to\*nship; Eli-abeth, who became the wife of 
Peter Burke, a resident of Whiteside county, and 
died a number of years ago, leaving three daugh- 
ters and two sons; and Alfred J., who operates the 
home farm. He married iliss ?Iavy .7. Wisely, 
who died in i;)03, leaving one son, Alfred Leo, 
now eleven years of age. They had also lost a 



/ 



C. n. DELANO. 



]'j;i:sj;.\T of i;li;i:au colwj'Y. 



637 



Ellon, wli„ died wli, 



old/ 

Politically ilr. Gijiiam ha- aluayi voted tlio 
deiiiocratic ticket since he became a naturalized 
Amciican citi7.cn. He has served as school di- 
rector and in other township ofliccs. lie was reared 
in tlie Church of England but joined the Catholic 
church about five years ago. He ha.s now traveled 
far on life's journey and can look back over the 
past without regret, for he has alway.-^ been a man 
of strong purpose and of high principles, en- 
deavoring to do to others as he would have them 
do to him, and finding that while following 
straightforward business methods he could at the 
same time achieve a measure of success such a.- is 
desired by all who enter business life. He now 
receives the' "veneration and respect which should 
ever be accorded to one of his years and it is with 
pleasure that we pi-esent to our readers this record 
of his career. 



DEXXIS B1!ADY. 

Dennis Brady, living in Macon to^\n.-liiji. came 
to Illinois in ISoO and to Bureau county in 1S-">1. 
Although his residence here has not been continu- 
ous tlirough the intervening period, he has resided 
u])on his present farm since ISGS. He was boi'U 
in County Armagh, Ireland, September 10, lS'3o, 
and is a son of Francis and Xancy (O'Xeil) 
Brady, who were likewise natives of the Emerald 
isle. They were married in that country, and on 
a sailing vessel went from Belfast to Xew York 
city in 1S3S, arriving at the Atlantic port after 
eight weeks spent upon the water. They then 
proceeded up the Hudson river to Albany and by 
canal and team to Eochester, Xew York, -where 
the father worked as a brickmason and stonemason, 
having mastered the trade in his native country. 
Later, when his capital was sufficient to enable 
him to purchase a farm, he invested in land at 
the mouth of the Genesee river, where he lived for 
a long period. He was a member of the Eoman 
Catholic church, and gave his political support to 
tlie democracy. Unto him and his wife were born 
four children, three of whom survive, namely: 
Dennis, ^Irs. Xancy Lynch, and Francis, who is 
living in California. Having lost licr first hus- 
band, the mother became the wife of Thomas 
McMauus, now deceased, and unto them were born 
four children, of whom two sons and a daughter 
are yet living. 

Dennis Brady was only three years old when 
brought to the United States by his parents, and 
his education was acquired in the public scliools 
of X'ew Y'ork. He remained a resident of the 
east untib twenty-five years of age, when, in the 
fall of ISoO, he journeyed westward to Hlinoi.-, 
eventually reaching La Salle. He was both a 
brickmason and plasterer by trade, and worked 
in La Salle throudi the summer of ISoL He 



then remo\ed to Indiantoun, now Tiskilwa, Bu- 
reau eount\-. and subseijueutly v^'cnt to Henry, 
Mar.-hall county. In the spring of lS.5-2 he made 
his way to St. Louis, Missouri, afterward to Yicks- 
burg, and on to X'ew Orleans, where he was em- 
ployed on the government custom house, then in 
course of construction. He afterward engaged in 
steamboating, and made a trip up tlie Cumberland 
river to Xasliville. Subsequently he returned to 
Xew Orleans and afterward proceeded up the Mis- 
sissijipi and Ohio rivers to Cincinnati. He w-as 
then again at St. Louis, and worked on the grading 
of the Illinois Central IJailroad at a tinie when 
the dirt was conveyed in wheelbarrows, for the 
modern machinery of the present time was then 
unknown. Jfr. Brady, however, was the first man 
to use a scraper for grading purposes. In the fall 
of 18.33 he returned to Xew Y'ork. where he re- 
mained until tlie spring of 1851. He no.xi made 
his way to Iowa City, Iowa, and at a hiter date re- ' 
turned to Indianto^\'n, where he was engaged at 
his trade. He afterward again went to the Empire 
state, and, following his marriage he returned to 
Indianti.iwn. Since ISCS he has lived upon his 
present farm, comprising three hundred and tweu- 
t}- acres of rich and productive land. He has now 
a well improved property, arul in 1891 he erected 
thereon a fine residence. He breeds shorthorn 
Durham cattle and also Poland China hogs and 
Xorman horses, shipping his cattle and hogs to 
the Chicago market. 

On the 22d of December, IS.Vi, :\Ir. Bra ly was 
nrarried to Miss Emily iloxon, who was born in 
Doylestowu, Bucks county, Pennsylvania, January 
2J:, 1S"2(J, the wedding being celebrated in Char- 
lotte, Xew Y'ork. ilrs. Brady was a daughter of 
John and Martha (Aldous) Moxon, both of whom 
were born in England, v\here their marriage was 
celebrated July 3, 1813. Tliey had si.x children, 
all born in England with the exception of Mrs. 
Brady. The father, whose birth occurred June 
28, ITSG, died Julv 20, ISTS, while his wife, who 
was born May 27," 1787, died Augu.st 21, 1829. 
They came to this countiy in. 1823 by sailing ves- 
sel and took up their abode in Doylestown, Penn- 
sjivania. removing thence to the state of Xev,- 
York. The father purchased a farm, which was 
partially improve'], in ilonroe county, Xew York, 
and at one time was the owner of two good farm 
properties. He held the ofBce of school director 
for a number of years and wa-s supervisor of the 
county poor for a considerable period. His interest 
in public affairs was deep and sincere, and was 
manifest by tangible support given to many move- 
ments that proved of public good. His political 
allegiance supported the democracy, while both he 
and his wife were baptized in the Church of Eng- 
land. L'nto !Mr. and ^frs. ^[oxon were born six 
children, of whom three still survive. Charlotte, 
the eldest, is the widow of Captain E. S. Church, 
and resides in St. Louis. Alfred wedded Mary 
Llovd and is now livinLC in Kansas. 



PAST AM) FJJHSKNT OF BUKEAU COU^'J'Y. 



Unto Mr. aud An. Brady liavj been Ijoru ui-ht 
childreUj of whom five still siK'\ive, as folliiwi: 
Eduard B., Frederick C, John D . JIanha E. and 
Arthur B. The family arc -svell known in the 
community as prominent, influential and respected 
citizens. Mr. Brady is a dcmocra:, and has served 
as school director for eight or twelve years, but 
has not been active as a politicia.i in the sense of 
ofEce seeking. He has now pass'id the eighty-first 
milestone on life's journey, and Lis has been an 
honorable and upright career, characterized by 
diligence, by perseverance and by unwavering in- 
tegrity. "While working at his trade ho visited 
many sections of 'his country, but in more recent 
years he has resided iipoii his fawn, and although 
now in the evening of life he yet gives pei'soual 
supervision to his place and its. improvements, 
seeming in spirit and interests yet in his prime. 
Altl]0ugli born across the water, he has ever been 
loyal to the stars and stripes, and has deep attach- 
ment for the institutions of the country. 



EOYAL VICTOIl C VSS. 

Royal Victor Cass, who follows farming and 
stock-raising in Concord township, annually feed- 
ing and handling a lai-ge number of hogs, cattle 
and horses, was born at Arlington, Bureaa county, 
June 17, 1857, his parents being Isaac Ilill and 
Hannah AV. (Blcxham) Cass, who came to Illi- 
nois the former about 18-50 and the latter in 
1853. The father was a grain buyer, who engaged 
in business at Wyanet for some j-ears and later 
turned his attention to the hardware and grocery 
trade. 

Royal V. Cass spent the days of hi^ bo\lior,d 
and youth under the parental ro( f; and was edu- 
cated in the sclnols of Wyanot and Princeton. 
"When twent}--t\\o years of ago he wont to Harper 
county, Kansas, where he renuiin^;d for a year, and 
then worked for one year on a cattle ranch for the 
To Kansas City Cattle Company. He afterward 
went to Cawley county, Kansas, where his father 
owned large interests, and tliere engcged in farm- 
ing for seven years. In 1890 he returned to Con- 
cord township, where he bought nis present home. 
He has a good farm, on wliich he has a modern 
residence and all conveniences that render rural 
life pleasant and facilitate the w )rk of the fields. 
There are good larns and other substantial out- 
buildings, and the farm is divided into fields of 
convenient sixe by well kept fences. He raises 
stock and feeds and markets large numbers of 
hogs, cattle and horses annually, this branch of 
his business proving very profitable. He has be- 
come well known as a stock-raiser and dealer, ami 
in his business is meeting with very gratifying 
success. 

As a companion and helpmate for life's journey 
Mr. Cass chose ^Miss Emma 'SI. I.'arling, whom he 
wedded on the 11th of Octol>er, 1883^ at Akron, 



Kansas. She is a daughter of W'.Uaid Darling, a 
farmei-, and they have become the parents of si.\ 
childien: Asa F., ^[amie M., L^^aac H.. Maitio 
Hannah, ;\[ary and Edith '\^ictor, all at home. 
In his political views Mr. Cass is a stalwart re- 
pitblican, but without aspiration for office. He 
belongs to the Congregational c'nurch, and is a 
school director, tlie cause of education finding in 
him a warm and stalwart friend. He witldiolds 
his support from no movement calculated to prove 
of general good, and as a citizm and in social 
and business relations has made a creditable record. 



MARSH.AL E. PRUTSMAX. 

Marshal E. Pratsman is the ovi'ner of one hun- 
dred and fifty-seven acres of choice laud adjoin- 
ing the village cf Kasbcer. He purchased this 
property in 1899, and has made his horn,, thereon 
since 1901. It is equipped with modern acces- 
sories and improvements, and indicates in its pres- 
ent fine appeara.iee his careful supervision and 
progressive methods. A native of Bureau county, 
Mr. Prutsman wa? born April It, 1859, and is a 
sou of ^\. R. and ifary (.\dams; Prutsman, like- 
wise natives of this county. In tbei" family were 
three children, of whom ilarshal E. is the eldest. 
He is indebted to the public school =:y3tem of the 
county for tlie educational privileges which he en- 
joyed and which prepared him for life's practical 
and responsible duties. He was reared to farm 
life, early becoming familiar wif.h the work that 
falls to the lot of the agriculturist; as he plows and 
plants his fields dnd harvests his crops. 

Having arrived at years of matiP.ity, Mr Pruts- 
nutu was married on ChrisUnas day of 1883 to 
ilis? Xora Adams, who was born in Illinois, De- 
cember 9, 18G5, a daughter of Robert and Amanda 
(Sill) Adams, the former a nati.o of the state of 
Ohio and the latter of Pennsylvania. They came 
to Bureau countv with their respective parents in 
their childhood days and were mai'iled here. Eight 
children were born unto them, and ■Mrs. Prutsman 
is the eldest of the family. She, too, acquired a 
common school education, and renuiined under the 
parental roof until her marriage. Four children 
have been born of this union: Ray 0., who was 
born September 23, 1S8G, and lied August 13, 
1905; Harold C, born July 29, 1895; AVinifred 
B., who was born August 18. 1899, and died April 
1, 1904, and Orletha M., born J'Xie 5, 1906. 

The family are members of fhi "\rcthodist Prot- 
estant church, and in politics Mr. Prutsman is a 
prohibitionist — associations which indicate much 
of the character of the num and his devotion to 
high and honorable principles. Throughout his 
business career he has carried -^ farming, and 
now owns one hundred and fifty-seven acres of 
choice land adjoining the village of Kasbeer, 
valued at from one hundred and seventy-five to 
two hundred dollars per acre. He is entirely a 



I'AST AXD riJESKXT OF BLIJEAU COUNTY 



fi30 



sclf-iuaJo man, staning out ia U'^ oiuply hamlt'd, 
witliout assistance from any source. In IS'JD he 
purchased his present farm, and two years hiter 
took up his abode thereon. lie now rents his 
hind and practically lives retired, leaving the active 
work of the fields to others. Tlicro ^re excellent 
buildings upon the place and lin-j shade trees, and 
the farm is splendidly located. This excellent 
family enjoys life to the fullest extent, and are 
numbered among Bureau county's best citizens. 
The life record of Mr. Prutsman phould serve 
as a source of encouragement and inspiration to 
others, showing what may bo accomplished \vheu 
one has the will to dare and the courage to do, for 
it has been in tliis way that he h-\? attained a 
gratifying mcasuTC of prosperity. 



DAY]]) L. MILLEK. 

David L. Miller has been a most active and 
prominent factor in the prumotion of the interests 
of the town of ilanlius, and at the same time has 
successfully conducted outside business affaii's, the 
extent and importance of which have nuide him a 
representative resident of the community. He 
was born ^larch 21, ISGl, in Manlius township, 
upon the present site of the village, and is a son 
of David Addison Miller, who came to Bureau 
county, Illinois, in 1850 from Clark county, Ohio. 
It was in the latter county that he was born 'May 
2, 18:37. He had no special advantages nor priv- 
ileges in his youth, and started out in life on his 
own account empty-handed. He chopped wood 
and worked at farm labor for some time in order 
to gain money sufficient to enable him to purchase 
land, but as the years passed he eventually amassed 
a comfortable fortune, having at one time about 
six hundred acres of valuable land. He was also 
an extensive breeder of horses, cattle and hogs, and 
for years engaged in stock buying. He likewise 
did business as an auctioneer, conducting stock 
sales, in which connection he became very v,-idel^- 
known. He possessed the unfaltering purpose and 
keen business discernTncnt that enabled him to 
carry forward to successful completion whatever 
he undertook, and he made a splendid record, not 
only by reason of his prosperity, but also on ac- 
count of his business probity and straightforward 
dealing. 

David A. Miller was married in Bureau county 
to Miss Ovanoa Williains, and unto them was born 
one son, 'WilUam W. Miller, who is now residing 
in Wyaiict. After the drath of the wife and 
mother David A. Miller was married to her sister, 
Amanda M. "Williams, and they became the par- 
ents of six children, who are still living, as follows: 
Mary Ann, the wife of Joseph Kulp, of Prince- 
ton; Julia Delplue, the wife of Lylo P. Smith, of 
Manlitis; David L. ; Owen Alonzo; Maud May, the 
wife of T>al[>h Follett ; and Bmtha D., who is at 
homo. They also lost two children. Mr. Miller, 



coming to tlds county in limited financial circum- 
stances, steadily worked his way upwai-d. PJach 
year he made advancement toward the goal of 
prosperity, and the methods which he followed 
were such as would bear the closest investigation 
and scrutiny, so that his name became an honored 
one in business circles aud all acknowledged that 
his success was the fitting reward of his labor. 

David L. Miller, reared in his parents' home, 
entered the public schools at the usual age, and 
when he had mastered the branches of learning 
therein taught he took up the business of farming 
and stock-breeding, thus taking his place in agri- 
cultural circles as one who recognizes the obliga- 
tions that devolve upon the individual as he attains 
manhood. In connection with the tilling of the 
soil he engaged in business as a stock buyer, and 
has also bred stock, keeping fme registered and 
pedigreed horses and cattle. In July, 1905, when 
the town of Manlius was incorporated, he divided 
forty acres from the farm, and on that land the 
railroad built its property and laid out the town. 
He likewise became manager of the Northwestern 
Elevator Company from the tinre its elevator was 
constructed, and thus successfully controlled the 
grain trade until his son, wishing to enter business 
life, became his successor in the management of 
the elevator. 

^Miile his private business interests have claimed 
much of his time aud attention, he has yet found 
opportunity to devote to matters of public moment, 
and has always stood for advancement aud prog- 
ress. In 1901, upon the formation of the drainage 
commission, he was made one of the commis- 
sioners, in wliich capacity he has since served, 
being elected at each succeeding election. He has 
also served as school director for twelve years and 
has filled the ofTice of alderman in Manlius, being 
chosen to the position upon the democratic ticket. 
He believes it to be the duty as well as the priv- 
ilege of every American citizen to exercise his right 
of franchise and to stand in support of those 
measures and principles which careful considera- 
tion and sound judgment indicate to be a correct 
policy. 

Mr. Miller was married December 23, 18S2. to 
Miss liizzie Bowen, of Walnut, Illinois, a daugh- 
ter of Burton and Julia Bowen, farming people of 
this part of the state. The marriage has been 
blessed with eight children, seven of vvhoni are 
living: Burton B., born December 31, 1SS3, who 
is now manager of the Xorthwesteru Elevator 
Company at Manlius, and who married Lulu 
Jones, of Manlius, on the 10th of June, 190G ; 
Bertha L., at home; Julian Stewart ; Perry David; 
Harold Foster; Dorothy Elizabeth; Arminia Dora, 
who was born April 23, 1S9S, and died February 
3, 1899; and Donu'd L.slie, b..,-a Sept-Miber 12, 
1903. 

In every conmiunity are found men of enterprise 
and worth who recognize possibilities and are the 
leaders in those movetnents which bring about 



G40 



r-VST AXi) l>i;KSI^XT OF 1;UJ;kau C'OUXTY. 



iiiaterial piospenty aud sul.stautial c^rouiii aloru^ 



MAXK M. SKEFrJXGTO\ 

Frank 3[ Skeffington, the owuor of vahnMe 
proper^- interests and a :naa of conile a 1 

^ofthe;;,;^1o.S-r'^le;eT^rS 
conhnuor.sb- since 1S9C. His parents were Pat 

-Locath.ii, ; "' '''''"'" ^'^^"^' ^'-^'"^ to Illinois. 
i.ocatjng m Lureau county, their son, Frank At 
was here bom and reared and he eomp lote his 
education m the schools of Arlington. 1^ ou.) 
i t div'"//"'' ^''' ''''T f^llo-ed^rming andi 

He"-a ?olc?, ^th ""^' °' "'^^^''"^^'^^^ "i^^ 
u- r"""b- the owner of eighty acres of hnrl 
on which the l.'oclielle & Northern JfaHwav Coi 
Company ],as located the town of Cher Lvir^ 
a population of about eight hundred ^' ° 

Mr. Skeffington started out in life lar.^ely eniptv 

SfronA-'n V'^ °' ^"^ -arriagelirene 

ear Xr l' f' i ''^' "P°^ ''^''^' '^^ lived for a 

^0 f ' fi".^''i'cli lie removed to the Jlilner farm 

ea.t of Arhngton. There he resided for five yea s 

fevt'anf '",'V?^''^''-=^ °- hiir^efaTd 
he old ,°run I f "'* ^r"''' °^ ^^'^^ ^^^""^ as 
i«Qo '/'"°;'y tarin. He made tJie purchase in 
1692 and ook up his abode tl,ereon iil Ys'?. n 
1304 he so d eighty acres to the Eoehelle Eailroad 
Company lor two hundred and thirty-one dolhr. 
per acre and the same year he houghl of Herma 
Gray one hundred and sixty acres for whin , V. 
pa.d one hundred and seint yle'^SoHa f pe 
tne Old Grundy farm in 1803 His bi,.;inn^. „ 

p'rop.??," '"» '"" '■'-'■ "» '«'»■" upon hi: 

On the 9th Of February, 1838 Mr Sl-effin^u 
was united in n.arriage to M.?s' Teresa cSeT 

of farmmg „p to the time of his death Mr and 
Mrf '^l-el'j/'T '''\'' fo'-owed Iteoce'upat o 
MUrt j--^ ' t'?'" ^'^'''"'^ the parents of three 
children, Joseph, Francis and Anna, and the f- i 

Aili^^fn:"""""^""'^ °^ ^'- f'^'thol.c clulrch of 



3i?l'''n^''f' r°'?" ^'''"-' '^ Woodmen lod^^e No 
He s now e\"° '"' '"^^ V' ^'^''^'^ '^ ^ ^l°>-cna ■ 

c&hrhafi^/S^'^-j?^!;-;:;^^^;^ 

m AVestfield township for nine yc. ben" /,''' 
mcun lent at the present time. hYs good "flu " 
have been manifest in his pro^re^^ivc citX r 
as well as in his private busfnels In^^J^'^ h^ 
Joserves much credit for what he has ac oni, Iil j 
as a farmer h,s success being attributable en i J 
hi. own labors and the assistance of hife t i"* 
able wife, who has indeed been a faithful co" 
panion anc helpmate to him on li e's Irn ' 
llie fact that many of his warmest f riends a ' 
hose who have known him from his boyh od d" 
the present is an indication that he has aha • 
ned as to win uniform confidence and resoe; 
and he deserves tlie admiration of his felloS n 



cnuKCH OF the ]m.maculat£ cox 

CEPTIOX. 

Aniboy and Dixon attended to the spnitS waiit^ 

Eur::;rjndt°"" ;r'^° ^^ the^oiiiieL; ;s 

01 i^uitau and the southern part of Lee counties 
Mass was ceebrated and the saeramen w^-e d" 
inmistered at intervals in the Guc^erty and 0'\. 1 
school houses and in the town h°al ^ £ in.t 

On March 1, 1875, the Rev P T r^ i 
sumed charge of the parish a 'i^ fn-"-f°?'^' ''," 
took up the^work of ^^mpie^ing-^SlhS' H 
.tincture and also put in the handsome oak peu's 

Sorie ' fA 1°' °'-g'"^'=='°S the Father Mathew 

tilTfl^:, ' ^t^ ^'' '^"''■V' ^"^-'^ g°°d^ and which 
stiii tlouiishes as a parish society 

Faafe'r n-R ?'™'^^i^ ''''"^''''' ''^' purchased by 
ous n.^? T' '''^ continued to serve the vari- 
bv fi?e in I^S' "l'";r^''^ ^^"" t^" its destruction 
till S84 . ^^^^''' ^■^'■'^^"^ P'l^'torate lasted 
til lSb4 when Eev. J. A. Fannin- a^sum-'d 
charge._ Father Fanning made mZ" imp o ve 
meats in the church durhig the f ou; y^ r" o h s 

o'?the''n:-- r'' ^''""'^ '^"' *^^ Slit o'f a nuniltr 
of the parishioners, was placed in the tower in his 



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J7-^--^>-^-L C-l^ , O^^L . & /iQ^y^^-^-^-^y 



T»AS' 



AM) I'KKSKNT (JF 



iUJIKAL' COLW'TV 



time. In 18SS tiii' Kuv. James O'ilouikc was 
appoiutod to succeed Father F'anniiig. Father 
O'liourkc was a man of frail constitution, and iu 
December of tiie vear of his aj)pointnicnt he was 
called tn liis reuard. 

Kiiv. 15. H. Corley came to the ]Ku[>h in ISS!) 
and remained its pastor till ISl*'.'. The liL'autiful 
main altar which adorns the thiurh was jjur. li^i.,ed 
by Father Corley. Eev. 11. W. Fm. h suec.eLled 
Father Corley in 1892, and was pastor of the 
church till 1899, when he died. Father Finch 
was the last pastor to occupy the old parochial 
residence. 

On March VI. IXW. Ifev. K. F. Flynn, tlic pres- 
ent pastor, was a]ipointrd to the parish. During 
his pastorate he has erected the parochial resi- 
dence, a beautiful brick structure, which was built 
in 1899. St. Joseph's Academy, also a brick 
building, erected in 190.3, 'and used by the chil- 
dren of the parish as a free graded and high 
school, taught by Sisters of :Mercy of Ottawa, Illi- 
nois, and also in 1904 establi^lir,! a Home for the 
Aged, which is likewise condurtrd by i]\r Sisters 
of ilercy. The parish as at piTSciu coi:stituted 



ICXATirS J. JAGODZIXSKf. 

Ignatius J. Jagodzinski, a popular, respected 
and leading citizen of Spring vallov, who has 
been called to several positions of public trust, 
serving for tlu'ee terms as city tiea=urer, is also 
a leading merchant of the town, g7>d is today 
owner of a most extensive inercanti'e enterj)rise 
iiere. He was born in Poland, a son of Francis 
and Catherine (Smeut) Jagodzinski, who were 
likewise natives of Poland. The f-itiier came to 
the new world when his son Igmtii::- \\;i- but six- 
years of age, and establislied lii^ Imme m ha Salle 
county, Illinois. 

Ignatius J. Jagodzinski wa-; I'dinatcd in tlu; 
pubTic schools of La Salle cuuntv and in St. 
Francis Seminary, at ililwaukee, \Viscon.-,in, and 
also in St. Yiateur College. Flis education com- 
pleted, he engaged in the drug bu.^ine.'^s for a short 
time, after which he was employed iu the ofTice of 
the county clrrk and of the probate clerk in Ot- 
tawa for two \i'ars. On the expiration of that 

barkrd in -mmi m.TrT,:,ndi-rn-, o',!MMidin,- a 
.-toiv. which has unmu to bo tlio nio.i oMcnsixe in 
this place. He carries a large and carefully se- 
lected line of goods, anil has a constantly growing 
trade, which is accorded him in recognition of his 
conformity to a high standard of eomnu;rcial eth- 
ii-; a- ucll as his reasonable prices. Mr. Jagod- 
zinski is also a director and vice president of tlie 
Spiirig \'alley City Bank, and has the agency for 
steamships and for foreign batdv-ing and exchange. 
He is likewise agent for various ti:-e insurance com- 



panies, and his business interests aiv -liiis extensive 
and varied. Tli.n aiv likewise inolll-ible, owing to 
hiscapabl,. coniio: and keen di.-^cnHi, old. 

Mr. Jagodziioki has also liguivd prominently in 
j)olilical circles in lUireau eouniy. ind lias done 

ineiit and |ii-ospeiity of bis city and section of the 
state. Foi- tlire,' leniis he lias served as city treas- 
uivr, and has lilli'd oilier otlices of public trust. 
lie IS a popular man, ivspecb'd !.,■ all and his good 
gu.ilitics are inanv. 



Fl.'AXkldX S. POGFHS. 

Franklin S. Pogers is one of the self-made men 
of Bureau county, vlio at au early age started out 
in life on his own accouirt and through unremit- 
ting toil and business integrity has worked his way 
steadily upward, gaining the respect of his fcl- 
lowmen by bis honorable methods and at the same 
time wini'ii.m a comforiablc conii-teiire. He re- 
sides in La Moillc township and is t.-day the 
owner of six hundred and se\enty-tive acres. He 
was born in ]Morgan count}-, Ohio, February 27, 
18-36, while his residence in Bureau county dates 
from ISdC. His jaivnts were .Tolin and" Su-^r.n 
(Antrim) Po-er..., nalixes of Burl iii-N:,,. Xew 
Jersev. On ler.vin- that stale 'he\- located in 
Ohio ami afteiwatd (ame fo Dlin-,,/ where their 
remainine d:iv> were passed. In I'lei- family were 
eight chiMicn: J. ..iitrim, .'^arali W., Franklin S., 
Hannah. William, Kflwin, ilary aid Charles. 

Beared in the state of his nativity, Franklin S. 
Pogers acrpiir 'd his education in the Tuiblic schools 
there, and when b. put aside hi- t*e\t-books be- 
came a factor in buMne,,- Hfr in couneiiion with 
the hardware trade. He was nianied iu Ohio in 
IS,-,: to Miss h'ebecea J. Yocuni, wlio wa, born 

was educated in the public sd 1. there, and was 

a daugliter of Thomas and Sai.ih Yocum, who 
were natives i,[ I'.clmont countv, vlieie thev spent 
their entire li\cs. dying at the pl„ce of their birth . 
at a good old age. 

In the rear isbb .Mr. Ifogei's brouoht his familv 
to Illinois, settlin- in Buivau cou:it\-. Tnto him 
and his wife were br.rn two danghterM Mr.^. 
Susan W. Grisell and .Mrs. .Marv C. Grisell. After 
coming to this state he turned l:i> attention to 
farming, settling upon the plaie wher> he now 
lives. He first had eighty acres, but he owns alto- 
gether six bundled and seveiity-fiv,' acres of choice 
land, of which till" hundred and twentv acres is 
in Iowa. In iMii; he purchased land, at'fifly dol- 
lai> pel- aire, wlirh is iiou valued at from one 
hundre,! and se\erty-llve to two hundred dollars 
per acre. Tiu' )>bhc i- impnecd with good build- 
ings and all modern e.piipnients, and lie is today 
one of the most substantial farmers of the com'- 
miinitv. 



64 1: 



PAST AND ri;j-:SEXT OF LUKKAU COU.NTY. 



Jlr. liogors was i'onnerly a meii'bci of the Inue- 
peiulent Order of Odd Fellows, but his business 
interests luavc occi.'picd so much of his atteution 
that he luis had r.c time for active idcntiiication 
with fraternal interests. In poli'ics he is a pro- 
hibitioziist, having given his support for eighteen 
years to the party which emhodie.^ his ideas on the 
temperance question.. lie was reared in the faith 
of the Societ\- of Friends or Quakers, to whicli he 
still adheres, but is not a membei- o*' any church. 
His life has been Icnorable, his actions manly and 
sincere and his piinciplcs wort'iv of emulation. 
The years hare b.-ought him suc':esses as tlie re- 
sult of his perseverance and industry, and in all 
of his business transactions he !ias been found 
thoroughly trustworthy and relialjle As a neigh- 
bor., and friend he is held in high esteeni; and he 
well deserves mention in this volume as one of 
the representative agriculturists 'i' the county. 



HOWAKJ) G. GIBBS. 

Honored and respected by all, there is no resi- 
dent of Princeton who occupies a more enviable 
position in mercantile and financial circles than 
Howard G. Gibbs, member of the hardware firm of 
H. I). Gibbs & Sons. It is true that he entered upon 
a business already established, but many a man 
of less resolute spirit would have failed in en- 
larging the scope and activities of the concern. 
His position in public regard is due not only to 
the success he has acliicved but also to the straight- 
forward, honorable methods that he has ever fol- 
lowed and which place him in the front ranks of 
those men who vidiile gaining prosperity also help 
to hold firm the public faith in business integrity. 

He was born in Princeton, Xovember 25, 1863, 
a son of Henry D. Gibbs, who is too well known in 
Bureau county to need introduction to the read- 
ers of this volume, having for many years been 
closely associated with industrial and commercial 
life here. He is a native of Chenango county. 
New York, and came to Princeton in 1857. He 
accepted the position of manager of a tanning 
factory, which was then one of the leading indus- 
tries of the city and later he engaged in the coop- 
erage business, which ho carried on until 1879, 
when he turned his attention to the hardware 
trade, establishing the store which has since been 
conducted as one of the leading mercantile enter- 
prises of the city. In 1890 he'admitted his sons, 
Howard G. and Harry A., to a partnership, under 
the firm style of H. D. Gibbs >1- Sons. The father 
is still active and takes an interest in the busi- 
ness which he established and which he has seen 
grow and prosper until it is now one of the most 
extensive in this section of the state. In early 
manhood he was married to iliss Xancy Windsor, 
a native of Chenango county, New York, in which 
state the wedding was celebrated prior to tlieir 
removal to Illinois. 



Ilouard G. Gibbs was educatL-d in the grauuuar 
and high schools of Princeton and on pultini,' 
aside his text-books joined his father in busine^.!! 
He mastered the trade in principle and detail ami 
in 1890 was admitted to a partnership. He 
brought to the concern the enterprise, energy and 
ambition of a young man, which, added to the 
broad experience of the father, has made this one 
of the strong commercial combinations of Prince- 
ton. 

Howard G. Gibbs has also been active in munic- 
ipal afl'airs, wielding a wide infiuence on public 
thought and action. He has served for two terms 
as alderman of the second ward and for four years 
was supervisor of Princeton to^ii;shi]). In April, 
190G, he was elected chairman of the board of 
supervisors and is the present incumbent in the 
office. With a sense of conscientious obligation, 
he discharges his official duties, and brings to bear 
in their performance the executive force and keen 
discrimination of a practical business man. 

In 1SS7, Mr. Gibbs was united in marriage to 
Miss Mary K. Waldroii, a daugha-r of Z K. Wal- 
dron, of Chicago, formerly a respected resident of 
Bureau county, of whicli he was a pioneer. He 
served at one time as sheriff" of the county and 
has long been a respected and ini'uential resident 
here. He is a native of New York, as is his wife, 
who bore the maiden name of Margaret Arch- 
bald. Mr. and Mrs. Gibbs are prominent socially 
and ilr. Gibbs has attained high rank in Masonic 
circles. He belongs to Bureau ledge F. & A. M. ; 
to Princeton chapter. No. 28, E. A. M. ; to Orion 
council, E. &■ S. M. ; to Temple commandery. No. 
20, K. T.; and to the Order of the Eastern" Star. 
Ho has held many offices in 3Iasoury, was wor- 
shipful master of Bureau lodge f.^- six years and 
eminent commander of the commandery for two 
years. He holds membership in the Congrega- 
tional church and is president of the Congrega- 
tional Church Club. His interest extends to tho.=e 
various movements which work for civic virtue, 
for progressive development in t;;e city and for 
intellectual and moral advancenv?nt. The busi- 
ness policy he has ever followed i^as been that of 
straightforward dealing. His life typifies the spir- 
it of tlie age — the spirit of American progress. 
Prospeiity has come to him as a natural sequence 
of industry and applicition and his success boars 
testimony to his rare judgment in business affairs. 



HAEEY F. COEEY. 
Harry F. Corey is the owner of a valuable farm 
property of three hundred and twenty acres in 
Dover township, and is therefore numbered among 
the prosperous young business ::ien of Bureau 
county. Though he inherited a portion of his 
property, he has added to it, and has made many 
modern improvements, being todav accounted one 
of the progressive and highly re-ipccted farmers 















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HEXJJY i). GIBBS. 



PAST AXD rj;i':,SEXT OF BUREAU COUXTV 



of the conimuuity. His birth cKCiirreJ in tliis 
loimty, Seplcml)e"i- 20, 1876. He was the only 
chilli born to Hamilton F. and Eacliel (Martin) 
Corey, the latter 3 native of Ohio. T}»e father, 
hiiuever, had been previously married to Esthef 
.Mead, and luito them were born five cliildreu. The 
father was born :n Cayuga county, Xew York, 
.Tuly IT, 1811, and in 1S3.J einig-'akd t^ Morgan 
fouaty, Illinois, wlience he came to I'.ureau county 
in IS.'iO, locating in Ohio township. 

At the usual a^e Harry F. Corey entered the 
common schools of the county, wherein he mas- 
tered the clemcnhiry branches of learning. His 
training at farm labor was not meuger, and he 
early became familiar with the uest methods of 
tilling the soil and caring for the crops. Tn early 
manhood he wedded Miss Frona Huffaker, the 
wedding being celebrated on the I'^th of July, 
lS'.i9. She was born in Bureau county, December 
31, 1S74, aad is a claughter of C\'i-us and Anna E. 
(Sabin) Huffaker, also natives of Bureau county. 
Tn ilieir family were fourteen children, of wdiom 
ifrs. Corey was the third in order of birth, and she 
supplemented her early educational privileges by 
study in Dover Academy. The home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Corey has be-n blessed with one child. Hazel 
E., born January 2, 1900. 

The family hon;e is au attract' "e residonce, sit- 
uated in tlie midsi of a beautiful grov^^ of shade 
trees and surrounded by three hunlred and twenty 
acres of choice land, which respor.ds readily to the 
care and labor be.-'.towed upon it. ]\[r. Corey in- 
herited a large share of his property from his 
father, but has added to it in many ways, and is 
thoroughly in touch with the pragressive spirit of 
the times. He keeps a fine autimohile. and his 
farm in all its equipments is modern in every 
respect, ^^'hile he leads a busy .and active life, he 
is relieved of the necessity for strenuou?, unre- 
mitting labor, and has time fo;' the cultivation 
of those social and refining influences which de- 
velop character and add to the aesthetic and moral 
tone of the eommuuity. Both he and hi.3 wife are 
members of the Jfethodist Protestant church, and 
in politics he is a republican, but the honors and 
emoluments of office have no attraction for him, 
although in a pri\ate capacity he is never neglect- 
ful of his duties of citizenship, -and has given his 
aid and co-operation to many movemeuti for the 
general good. Borh he aTul his wife are repre- 
sentatives of prominent old families of Bureau 
county, and with pleasure we present to our read- 
ers this record. 



CHAKLES C. COXLEY. 
Charles C. Conley, who is engaged in fanning 
two hundred and forty acres of land in ilaeon 
township, w^here he is also breeding Xorman ami 
Percheron horses, was Ijorn in tliis township. De- 
cember 3, 18'3-5. His parents were George VT. and 



I'ryphena (Sturtcvant) Conley. His maicrnal 
grandfather. Church Sturtevant, was born at Cen- 
ter Harbor, .Xew Hampshire, Ju:ii> 30, Isn;, was 
a son of Hosaiah and Sally (Paine) Sturtevant, 
and was of ^Vels]l lineage. Fami'y tradition has it 
that a widow and her five sons came from Wales 
to America at an early day in tlu colonization of 
the new -svorld and settled at Bt.fast, ifassachu- 
setts. Hosaiah Sturtevant was a Eevolutionary 
soldier throughout the war for national inde- 
pendence, and, being captured at Stony Point, 
was imprisoned for a year in the old sugar re- 
finery in Xew York city, but was finally exchanged 
and returned to his home in Hahfax. He subse- 
quently removed to Xew Hampshire, settling there 
in the midst of an unbroken wilderness. He took 
up his abode on an island of about three Iiundred 
acres in Squawni Lake and began the cultivation 
of the land with the assistance of hi.s soii. Church 
Sturtevant, who remained at Center Harbor until 
he was twenty-one years of age, during which time 
he attended the crmmon schools and worked on 
the farm. He was married in March, 1S27, to 
Hannah, daughter of Jerry Brown, of Center Har- 
bor, and in 1831 removed to Peaehum, Yermoiu, 
where he carried on agricultural ivarsuit,-. After 
about thirteen years he traded his farm in A'ermont 
for some wild prairie land in Illinois and started 
westward in June, ISl-i, settling in Osceola town- 
ship. Stark county. For five ye^i.'s he lived in a 
rented cabin and then built a baru. in which he 
lived for one winter and two sumns -rs. He liought 
the first lundjcr that was shipped on the Illinois 
canal, and built a pavt of his residence, to whicl!, 
howe\er, he made additions from time to time in 
later years. His home farm consis;ed of one hun- 
dred and si.xty acres of laud, 'nclosed with an 
osage orange hedge, and in addit'ou to cultivating 
the fields he set ou-1 a fine apple .jrchard. and also 
had many cherry tiees upon his plate. L'nto Mr. 
and ^frs. Sturtevant were born eijic children, in- 
cluding Tryphena, who became M^-s. Conley. 

George W. Conley, father of Charles C. Conley, 
was born in Cayuga county, Xe\v York. June 2, 
1829, and died at his home in Puda, Aprd 21, 
1901, in his seveniy-sccond year. He was a son 
of Robert Conley, and was one of a family of 
eighteen children. In the spring of 18-50, at the 
age of twentj-'Oae. he left his n.TLive heath and 
came to Illinois, settling in Osceola township. 
Stark county. This state was then the "far west," 
and many hardships and privations were to be 
borne in the country, wdiicli at that time was 
sparsely settled. The virgin sod v^'as to be sub- 
dued, the cabin was to be built, t'^e clearing made 
and roads and bridges had to be constructed. 
There were a multitude of hardships .to be en- 
dured if the settler would enjoy ihe advantages 
kncv.-a to the older cast, and ilr. Conley resolutely 
undertook the task before him. He was married 
June 2, 1S.")3, on his twenty-fourih birthday, to 
Tryphena A. Stur'evant, who wa- born at Center 



PAST AND I'JiESE-NT OP BUKKAU COUNTY. 



HarlMU-, New Ilaniiisluiv, Maivl; 11, 1S3,S, and 
was the eldest, of teveii eliildieii. Witli lier par- 
ents slie emigrated from tlie old Granite state to 
Illiuois in 18J4, it requiring weeks to make tlie 
trip from Xcw En;;land. The fail following their 
marriage 5Ir. and Mrs. C'onlcy removed to Henry, 
Illinois, settling on what is known as Crow 
Meadow, where they resided for three years, when 
in 183G they boujlit a farm iu Bureau county, 
south of Walnut Grove, in Macon township. For 
twenty-live years thoy resided there and then re- 
moved to Biida, wlicix', with the exception of five 
years spent in Xebraska, they resided until called 
to their final rest. "With these advantages they 
managed, through their economy and thrift, to 
gatlier a competence for their declining years and 
to leave a comfoi table legacy t:- their children. 
Both JEr. and ilrs. Conley became members of the 
ilethodist Episcopal church on the Sth of March, 
1873, and remain; d faithful to lis teachings and 
to their professions, taking an aC-ive and helpful 
interest in church work and contributing gener- 
ously to its support. Mrs. Conley passed away on 
the 10th of February, 1901, at tlie age of seventy- 
two years, ten months and twenty-nine days, her 
husband surviving her for only i brief period, as 
his death occurred on the 31st of \pril following. 
They were a most highly csteemol couple, worthy 
the regard of all who knew them and the respect 
which was so freely accorded them. They were the 
parents of nine children : Abbie, of Buda : Frajik, 
of Princeton; Charles C; Bcr'c, of AVaco, Ne- 
braska; Mrs. Xettie Ziuk, of Buda; and Isabella, 
Jerome, Edward itad Ida, who h.ive passed away. 
Of this number Edward died July 9, 188-5, in 
Waco, Nebraska. He had been married in the 
previous spring and removed to the west with his 
bride. His remains were brought back to Bureau 
county for interment. The daugl'!:er Isabella died 
April S, ISiUi, at the age of forty -two years. She 
was born in Ilenrv. Illinois, and was a resident of 
Bureau county frojn 1S-5G, while of the Ifethodist 
Episcopal church she was a cjnsisti:nt member 
from 1ST3 until htr death. 

Charles C. Conley, whose name introduces this 
record, attended <lic public scho..ls in the winter 
months and worked on the home farm daring the 
summer seasons. His time was thus passed until 
he reached adult age, when he began farming for 
himself ou one huj^drcd and twenty acres of land. 
At the present tin\e he is fanning two hundred and 
forty acres of land, and is accotmtod one of the 
enterprising agriculturists of the community, 
owing to his capable and progressive methods. lie 
breeds some Xorman I'ereheron horses, but his at- 
tention is chiefly given to the development and 
cultivation of the fields, although he is also en- 
gaged in the raising of Poland China hogs. 

On the 11th of January. 1SS9, was celel)ratcd 
the marriage of Charles C. Conley and Ifiss Grace 
Smith, a native of Buda and a da ightcr of Henry 
Smith. She dii.'d on her second wedding anniver- 



sary, leuviiii: one son, Charhs S. C.mlrv. On th.' 
30th of January, 1891, Mr. C.;nley \vas again 
married, his secjiid union being with Lizzie !■'. 
Sowers, who was Ijorn iu I'erry county, I'enu- 
.'jylvaiiia, August i:6, 186-5, a daughter o"f Eman- 
uel and Catherine (Fleishcr) Sowers^ likewise 
natives of Perry county, where they wcrs married. 
Tlie father was born September 1, 1840, and the 
mother October 1 r, 1837. lie is a carpenter by 
trade, and was for many years engaged iu business 
as a contractor and builder, but at present is en- 
gaged in the insurance business. He has served 
as school director, is an advocate of political prin- 
cijiles as expounded by the dennrratic party, and 
is a memiier of the LuHieran cluireh. Of his seven 
children six arc now livinn-; ;Mrs. Conlev, Silas, 
Elsie J., Ennna T., Carrie ']•:. and Harry 6. Three 
children have been born unto Mr. Conley and his 
second wife: Harold S., born March il, 169G; 
Marion E., :\lav 11, I'.M.U, and Edna ilav, No- 
vember 27, 190.5. 

Mr. Conley vot'M with the republican })arty, and 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
His life has been honorable and upright, his ac- 
tions manl\ and sincere, and as a lifelong resident 
of Jbiion to'.Mishi}) he has become widely known, 
\\luli' Ins many g 'od qualities and sterling traits 
of ehai-aeior havu ffaiiicd hiui the confidence and 
good will of all with whom he has been associated. 



EinVARl) GUlTllEi;. 

Edward Guithcr, who owns, occupies aiid ope- 
rates a valuable farm of two hundred and sixty- 
seven acres in Walnut township, is one of Illinois" 
native sons, having been born in La .Salle county, 
July 2-5, 1850. His parents were Henry an"d 
Barbara (Pope) Guither, both of whom were na- 
tives of Germauv. Thev became residents of La 
Salle county in 1818 and the father followed farm- 
nig as a life uork, thus jiroviding for his family. 
A numijcr of years prior to hi- diMtii he removed 
to Walnut, where he retired from active business 
life, spending his remaining days in the enjoy- 
ment of the fruits of his former labor. He died 
June IS, 1905, while his wife pas>ed away Sep- 
tember 15, ISSS. 

Edward Guither, whose mimo introduces this 
record, completed his education in Xajierville Col- 
lege after having studied in the district schools 
of Walnut township. He pursued his college 
course during the years 1872 and 1873 and after 
putting aside his text-hooks began farming in Wal- 
nut township on section 1, where he has since 
resided. As a companion and iielpmate for life's 
journey he chose ^liss Caroline Rapp. to whom he 
was married on the 20th of September. 18711. 
She was born June IG, 1853. in this county, a 
daughter of John and Barbara (Faublc) Kapp. 
both of whom were natives of Germany. They 
became early residents of this part of the state, 



^ "^.. 



/ 



r-v^'// / '// ., y/// w / V ' 



I'A.s'j- AXD rjiESKX'j' OF ];l"i;i:al' lulwtv 



v.-lifre they :ini\cd prior to 1S50. Tlu-y wure 
funning people and livcil near La IFoille, Illinois, 
in Lcc coiuit}-, where they remained until called 
to their final rest, the father parsing away Feh- 
ruarv 5, 18G1, and the mother, who was born 
June 19, lS-23, died in 1SS4. ' Mr. and Mrs. 
Giiithcr iiave a family of four children: Samuel 
W.. George II.. Ezra P. and Florence A. M., all 
yet under the parental roof. Tlie parents and 
eliildren are members of the Evangelical church 
of Red Oak. The two sons, George and Ezra, have 
been attending college at Xapcrville, Illinois, and 
ilr. Guither is providing all of his children with 
excellent educational privileges. The family is 
prominent sociallv and the hospitality of their 
own home is greatly enjoyed by their many friends. 
Jlr. Guither has always followed fanning and 
now has a valuable property of two hundred and 
si.xty-seven acres on section 1, Walnut township, 
where ho raises the cereals best adapted to soil 
and climate and also some stock. His horses are 
of the Xorman breeds, his hogs Poland China, 
and he al.«o raises j)ure blooded shorthorn cattle. 
He likewise owns an interest in a fine Belgian 
horse and he is one of the stockholders in the 
Walnut bank. He is accounted a m.in of sound 
business judgment, carefully controlling his in- 
terests and making safe and judicious inve^tTnents. 
He has served as school director for a number of 
terjns and the cause of education has profited by 
his efforts in it? behalf. His home is a beautiful 
nnd commodious residence standing in the midst 
of great pine trees, and there are other large and 
substantial buildings on the farm. He is regarded 
as one of the most enterprising agriculturists of 
this part of the county and is respected and es- 
teemed by his neighbors and friends. 



WIELIA:\r A. CKISMAX. 
William A C'risman, of ^[aeon township, dates 
his residence in r>iireau county from 18^4, cover- 
ing a period of more than a half century. For 
Tiiany years he has been engaged in general agri- 
cultural pursuits and the raising of stock, and his 
success has come m the legitimate reward of per- 
sistent labor. He was born in Kedford county, 
Pennsylvania. February 13, IS-j], and is a son 
of William and Elizabeth (Bowser) Crisman. The 
father's birth occurred at Denen's creek, in Penn- 
sylvania, June 2G, ISSo. He was the sixth in a 
family of fifteen child -en, whose parents were 
William and Margaret Crismau, of Bedford coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, and his life history covered a 
period of almost el^rhty years, for he passed away 
on the 0th of February, 190-5. He was a self- 
made and self-educated man. He had limited op- 
portunities for schooling, and at the age of seven- 
teen he left hiiiiie [r learn the millwright's trade. 
After serving an apprenticeship of four years he 
'worked at his trade for two vears in Waterside, 



Pennsylvania. On the 2iilh of .\pvil, 1S-!S, he 
wedded ilargaret Bowser, and they made their 
home in the east until April, ISoo, when Mr. 
Crisman brought his wife and three children to 
Buda, having in tin meantime made a prosi>ectiag 
tour through Illinois and Iowa. For three years 
he worked at the carpenter's trade in Buda,' and 
then rented land for two years. Finally he pur- 
chased one hundred and sixty acres of prairie land, 
on which he was able to malcc a small pa}Tnent of 
one hundred dollars. He had a friend who aided 
him at this opportune moment, which enabled him 
to make the required improvements upon the place. 
By hard labor and strict economy he became one 
of the well-to-do farmers of Macon township, and 
as he was always dependent upon his own re- 
sources, the success he achieved was justly earned. 
His political allegiance was given ro the democracy 
in early life, his first presidential vote being cast 
for James K Polk. He voted with that party 
until the organizat.-on of the republican party in 
185(), after which he remained an earnest advo- 
cate of its principles until his death. He served 
as commissioner of his township for a number of 
years, and in him the public schools always found 
an earnest friend. He did effective service in be- 
half of public education, as a member of the 
school board and as school trustee for a period of 
fourteen years, and he always believed in employ- 
ing competent teachers. He was frequently a dele- 
gate to the county and state conventions of his 
party, and was recognized as one of the stalwart 
and leading republicans of 'Macoa townsliip. At 
the time of his death ho was a director in the 
Xeponset and ^lacon Insurance Company. He 
held membership in the Buda Baptist church, and 
from the first manifested an active interest in 
every phase of church work, an interest that was 
intensified witli the passing years. He was a mem- 
ber of the first building committee, and served two 
succeeding times when extensive repairs were 
made. He held the office of deacon nith but slight 
interruption from ISoS until the time of his death. 
In his material interests he prospered, and became 
the owner of four liundred acres, constituting a 
fine farm, pleasantly situated tli've and a half 
miles southwest of Buda. In lSS-3 Mr. Crisman 
was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, 
who died on the 10th of October of that year. She 
was born March 3, 1828, in Bedford county, Penn- 
sylvania, a daughter of John and ^fargaret 
(Hisong) Bowser. She was an excellent mother 
and a faithful and loving wife, ever ready to make 
sacrifices for the welfare of her family. She, too, 
was a devout member of the Baptist church, and 
in her life displayed many sterling traits of char- 
acter. Mr. Crisman survive<l until February 9, 
190-5, and then, in the eightieth year of his age, 
was laid to rest in Hopeland cemetery In the 
family were eight children: Calvin, wh.) is mar- 
ried and follows fanning in itaeon f.wnsbip: Wil- 
liau' A., who is married and is i farmer of the 



6.j4 



PAST AM) riMlSKNT OF llLKilAL' COL.X'J'Y. 



same townsliip: Viola, tiie wife ol" Joliu Ober, 
residiug on the old hoiiiesiead; Jfattit; L. and Ar- 
. thur v., twins; Carrie, tJie wife of Lewis Akin, 
and Anna, the wife of John G. Anderson, a resi- 
dent farmer of Macon township. 

William A. Cris-ian was onh- about three years 
of age when brough.i hy his parents to Illinois, at 
which time the town of Buda cjntained only a 
few houses scattered along the line of tho Chicago, 
Burlington & Quiucy Railroad, which had but just 
been complete!. Tiie father, a carpentei );y trade, 
built one of the luvt frame houses in Buda, wdiere 
he followed carpcitteriug until his removal to 
Macon township. In his boyhood days William 
Crisman attended tiie public scluols through the 
winter months and in the summer sea.sou worked 
upon -the homo far.n with his father, being thus 
engaged until lS7o. when he be'^an farming on 
his own account. He stcirted with only sixty acres 
of land, but Ik has added to this, and at the pres- 
ent tin\e is farming a quarter section, on whicli he 
has made sjdcndid improvements, having all the 
equipments of a model farm of tho twentieth cen- 
tury. In 1903 he built a fine barn. He is a 
breeder of Poland China hogs, keeping on liand 
from fifty to one hundred head, a^.d he j-so raises 
some shorthorn Durham cattle. 

Ou the 10th of February, ISTG, Mr. Crisman 
was married to Miss Alice K. Horton, who was 
born in ilacon township, Jami.iry 4, 18-55, a 
daughter of Allen and Margaret (Zinlv) Horton. 
Her father, the second son of Septimus and 
Wealthy (Foster) Horton, was born near tlie 
village of Stonerstown, in Bedford county, Penn- 
sylvania, December 31, 1S19, and died at his home, 
southwest of Buda. January 5, 1900, at the age 
of eiglity years and five days. He was one of seven 
children, si.x sous and a daughter. The father, 
Septimus Horton, was born in Bedford count}', 
Pennsylvania, November 11, 1795, and died Jlay 
20, 1831, while his wife, who was horn April 9, 
1794, long survived him and died March 3], ISSl. 
Septimus Horton learned the blacksmith"^ trade in 
early life, but made farming his chief occupation. 
He was a democrat in politics, and cast his last 
vote for Andrew Jackson. In October, 1832, he 
emigrated to Highland county, Ohio, where he re- 
mained until his death. 

Allen Horton, f;iiher of Mrs. Crisman, was only 
two years of age at the time of his parent-;' removal 
to the Buckeye state, the trip being made overland 
by wagon and requiring four weeks. When he 
was nineteen years of age he returned to his birth- 
place in Pennsylv.inia, where he remained for a 
little more than a year, during which period he 
began learning the trade of a carpenter and joiner. 
He followeil *hat occupation after his return to 
Ohio, and in 1S40 he again went to Pennsylvania, 
but after a brief period once more took up his 
abode in the Buckeye state. He had had but lim- 
ited educational privih^gcs. The log si-h^olhou.^e 
in which he obtaiiicd his primary cdui-.tiou was 



but sixteen feet square and was built of round logs, 
the chinks being daubed with mud. It was healed 
by an old-fashioned fireplace, and th'^ chimney 
was made of mnd and sticks. Greased paper took 
the place of window glass, and all of the furnish- 
ings were very primitive, but in later years Mr. 
Horton had the opportunity of attending a much 
better school. He was married December 22, 1812, 
in Licking county, Ohio, to Miss Margaret Zink, 
also a native of Bedford county, Pennsylvania. 
She was born January 1.3, 1820, and removed to 
Ohio with her pnnnls in 1812. "''hey bc'-ame tho 
parents of eight children: Alice C, now Mrs. 
Crisman; Addie, tlu widow of John W. McCIain, 
who now resides in Buda. These are the only ones 
living. Septir:.-JS I Horton, of tbi-< fa'.iily, died 
at his home ;rt Santa Cruz, California, where at 
the time of his death he was serving for the third 
year as a niernbor c" the police force. Almost his 
entire life, however, was spent in ra'lioad'ig. For 
one year he served as a soldier ;n tlic Civil war, 
and acted as one of the guards as-.ii'ned to watch 
over the body of the lamented T incolr after his 
assassination. He married Miss Anna Dolan, and 
thev had four childi'en. Septimus Hor^-cn was a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellov.-s, 
of the Grand .^\rmy of the Pepubl'c ind the Mac- 
cabees, and wa? spol en of by the Sinta C'-uz paper 
as one of the best otficers the town ever had. Other 
members of the fanlly of IMr. and Mrs. Allen Hor- 
ton were Mrs. Cat'.'erine Carper, ^fi-s. Mary Car- 
per, Lola, Harvey and Samuel, -ill of wlioni are 
now deceased. 

In the spruig of 1844 Allen n<-.rtou came to 
Bureau county, where he arrived after a three 
weeks' trijj in company with Jchn and George 
Zinlc. After prosp'cting for a time he finally de- 
cided to settle in Fidton county, wh'-'re he resided 
until 1847, when ho came to Macon township, Bu- 
reau county, where he made his home until his 
deatli. He had the honor of naming this township, 
was its first supervisor and reprewnted it on the 
county hoard. He was also sevcrLil times elected 
and served as township collector, and was school 
director of his di.-trict. His duties were ever 
promptly and faithfully performed, and he was a 
public-spirited man, aiding in the advancement of 
various interests in his town and ncighljorhood. 
It was about 1851 Uiat he purchased a farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres on section -^, Macon town- 
ship, for which he paid a dollar and a quarter 
per acre. The land was entirely unimproved, and 
the first house built thorcon was a log cabin. 
When the first survey of the Chicago, Burlington 
& Quiney Railroad was made the line went through 
a corner' of tho house, which was afterward moved 
to the present site, on the northeast quarter of sec- 
tion S, Macon township, and converted int^, a barn. 
Mr. Horton w.is unusuaHy succcisfui in his busi- 
ness afi'airs, rmd became one of the s'jbstantial 
fa'-mer^ of itacon town.ship. His polilical sup- 
port was given to tbe whig party, and he ca^t Iii.> 



PAST AND I'lIHSEXT OK I'.UltHAU COLLXTV 



Go 5 



iirst prwicl-ilial vntc I'or Henry Clay. He be- 
ciiine a standi eliampion of the caase of abolition, 
and wlicn the ropullioan party wa-s forinei^ to pre- 
vent the turtlior extension of slavtry he Joined its 
ranks, and continued one of its advocater until his 
death. He held membership in the Alethodist 
Episcopal clmrch, ai did his wife, and their Chris- 
tianity was evideactd in their every-day life. As 
a citizen Jlr. Hortoa was patriotic and law- 
abiding; as a Christian was conscientious, de- 
vout and pious; as a neighbor obliging and consid- 
erate; as a husband loving, faithful and true; 
and as a father kind, indulgent and firm. He 
had no enemies, as he was every persop's friend, 
and wherever known he was uniformly Icved. He 
survived his wife for only a few months, her death 
having oceiifred April 10, 1899. Mrs. Horton 
was a lady of gentle disposition, and her cheerful 
ways, her kindness cf heart, her cliarily and benev- 
olence and nev real goodness won for hti the love 
and respect of a wide circle of friends dud neigh- 
bors. Only two of the children of the fa;nily yet 
survive: Mrs. Crisman and Mrs. Addie jlcClain. 
The latter was born December 1.5, 18-5?, and on 
the 1.5th of February, 18S.5, she gavt; her hand in 
marriage to John \V. McClain, who was born in 
Troiigh creek valley, Huntington county, Penn- 
sylvania, Mareh lu, 1859. He eavie to Illinois 
about 18S1, and wuh the exception of ei'.rht years 
spent in Kansas, resided continuously in the vicin- 
ity of Buda. In his boyhood he became a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal chur'^b and lived a 
consistent Christian life. After an illness of about 
four years he passed away, July 13. 189=^. leaving 
a widow v.-ho now refides in Buda. 

Tlie marriage of ^Ir. and Mrs. Crisman was 
blessed with a family of six children: Tracey E., 
who was born TDeceiiiber 12, 1877, and is now liv- 
ing in New Mexico; Howard W., born March 30. 
1880 ; Merton A., who was born i'av 23, 1S82, and 
died March 13, 18SG ; Myrle, who v?as born May 
23, 1884; Ada, who was born December 21, 1889. 
and died June 27, 190G, and Clarence W., born 
November 1(1, 1893. The family have a pleasant 
home in Macon to;\nship, in the midst of a well 
developed farm, and in addition to this property 
Mr. Crisman owns a half section o'' land in Barnes 
county, Xorth Dakota, near Litchvills, which he 
purchased in 1901. 

He exercises his light of franchise in support of 
the men and measuces of the republican party, and 
is a member of the ilodern Woodmen of America. 
For twenty years or more he has been a school 
director, and has d' ne efTeetive work in behalf of 
the cause of public instruction h.;re, believing in 
the em])loym''nt of competent teaohfrs an-J in up- 
holding a high standard of education. He has 
long been a witness of the changes that have oc- 
curred in Bureau county, for wh"ii ae came here 
Buda was but a tiny hamlet, and much of the land 
throughout tlie co.nity wns still undcvelcped and 
uniTiiproved. \ow M lias lieen eonvettod into rich 



and produoti\c farni.s do!l._-d hL-r.; ^nd tl eiv with 
attractive and sab.staulial hoiiu.s; and all of the 
evidences of cultu c, learning and :eh..eiiient, as 
well as of business activity known to the older east 
are here to be found. The Crisuian family has 
long figured prominently as upholdeis of the legal 
and political statu- of the county and promoters 
of its intjlle.tua' u\(i moral i!nr:io'CJ;u.-nt; and 
in this cnniKvtiin "William A. Cri-raan bears an 
honorable rerord. 



EDMUND L. ANSTETH. 
Edmund L. Anstetli is classified witli the pinm- 
iiient farmers of Clarion township, where he owns 
and operates one hundred and eighty-nine acres of 
valuable land. He was born in this township, Jan- 
uary 28, 1S6G, his parents being Jacob and Lucy 
(Dayton) Ansteth, the former a native of Ger- 
many and the latter of Clarion township. Bureau 
county. The father is now living retired in Men- 
dota, but the mother passed av,-ay June 15, 1898. 
He became a resident of Bureau county in the 
early 'oOs, and at the age of twenty-six years he 
offered his services to the government in defense 
of the Union in the Civil war, becoming a mem- 
ber of the Fifty-second Illinois Eegiment, under 
Captain Bowen. Ho followed the fortunes of his 
company throughout the period of hostilities, and 
was ever a brave and loyal soldier. He enlisted 
one night together with seventeen other young men 
in the little German church in Perkins Grove, 
Clarion township, and was engaged in many de- 
cisive battles. After his return from the war he 
took up the occupation of farming, which he con- 
tinuously followed until recent years, when he put 
aside the more active work of the fields and is 
novi' living retired. 

Edmund L. Ansteth completed his education in 
the district schools of Bureau county, but has 
greatly broadened his knowledge through reading, 
experience and observation in later years. He has 
always been a great reader, and is deeply interested 
in educational work. He was reared to the occu- 
pation of the farm, and is today the owner of one 
hundred and eighty-nine acres of fine laud, consti- 
tuting one of the excellent farms of Clarion town- 
ship. This he has secured entirely through his 
own efforts, his close application, and his ability 
to plan and perform, combined with keen discern- 
ment in every lliiug relating to agricultural inter- 
ests, have made him a prosperous fanner, and he 
is now classed with the leading representatives of 
agricultural life in Bureau county. He raises the 
cereals best adapted to soil and climate, and also 
some cattle of mixed breeds. 

On the 24th of June, ISSS, Mr. Ansteth was 
married to itiss Emma Shambaugh, who was born 
October 11, 1809, a daughter of Peter and Elmira 
(Bash) Shambuugh. lioth of whom were natives 
of Ohio. Thev came to Bureau couniv in the 



650 



FA: 



A.\i) 1'J;K 



:.\T OF J',lj;kai 



early 'oOs, and tln' fatlier bc-au fanniiiLT lu'iv in 
ordrr tu pru\ido for l,i.- faiiiilv. llr i.> imu liviii,i,' 
retired, h..\vcver, altliough Ik- and his uitV still 
occupy the old home farm. He, lou. is a wti'ian 
of the Civil war, having served with an Ohio com- 
pany for three years during the period of liti-lili- 
ties for the preservation of the Union. 'J'hr liom,; 
of Mr. and Mrs. Aiisteth has been ble,ssed witli si.\ 
children : Key, Arthur, Walter, Harvey, Pearl and 
Edith. Mr. Ansteth is a member of 'the Modern 
Woodmen eainp at La .MoiUe and of the Methodist 
church, associations wliieli indicate miieh of the 
character of tlie man in his upright life and con- 
sideration for others. 



SAMl'Ki. oi'.Ki;*;. 

Samuel Oberg, a iviired farmer, residing near 
Princeton, still owns his farm of one hundred 
acres in Selby townsliip, which is operated by his 
son, Sclby Oberg, and also owns ten acres in 
Princetown township, located near the city of 
Princeton, on which he makes his home lb- i.- a 
native of Sweden, born on the 2l)th of June, is:;i, 
a son of Johannes (John) Andreas nnil Christina 
(Larson) Oberg, who were farming peoj)le in that 
country and died there more than twenty years 
ago. In their family were seven children, four 
sons and three daughters, of whom John and C'laus 
Oberg, and one daughter, ilrs. Gusta Nelson, the 
wife of Captain Nelson, all reside in Princeton. 
Claus Oberg is engaged in the meal business, while 
John is a fanner, of Arispie townshi]). One 
daughter, ilrs. Annie Fairn, still makes her home 
in Sweden. One son, Amlrew Johnson, also makes 
his home in Sweden ami is now eighty years of 
age. Otto and Sarah are deceased. 

Samuel Oberg was reared in his native' country. 
where he received but limited educational advan- 
tages. In 1861 he emigrated to America, lo- 
cating in Selby townshij). Bureau county, Illinois, 
where he purchased fifty acres of land which was 
covered with hazel brush. As his finaueial r.'- 
sources increased he added to this tract untd at 
one time he was the owner of four hundred am! 
ten acres, but he has since sold three hundred 
and ten acres, so that he now has but one hundred 
acres. lie has always engaged in general farm- 
ing, and for ten years conducted a "dairy, selling 
milk in Princeton. 

Mr. Oberg was married forty-seven years ago 
in Sweden to Miss Johanna Earn. Her father was 
a soldier in the Swedish army, and died in that 
country a number of years ago. Mrs. Oberg is 
now seventy years of age. Mr. and- Mrs. Olierg 
are the parents of the following named: .-Mberl, 
born in Sweden, has resided in ilinnesota for Jie 
past twenty years, where he is engaged in '.r'-neral 
farming. He is married and has four sons and 
one daughter. Lavine, horn in Suede;i, is a 
farmer, of Priiieeton tow n-lnii. He has been mar- 



:d by tb. 

.o,ul ,„,. 



d d;ni. 
the w 



AK 



.Mo, lie. I'.uivau county. They liave a son and 
daughter ii\iiig. Selby, who is operating his 
father's farm in Selbv to\raship, was married ui 
this eouiitv to ^[iss "Amanda A.xelson, who was 
born 111 S\wd,.n and cauie to America in the fall 
of ISSli. Slie is a daiigliter of A.xel and Johanna 
A\.'l>oii, and the foniiei died in Sweden in lSi)i, 
while her niotlier now makes her hmne with Mr. 
and Mi-ci. Selby Oberg. They are the parents of 
two daughters. (Iracc and Ilazel, both at honi'j. 
William Oberg is noxc in Cuba, being in the em- 
ploy of the government, engaged in railroad build- 
ing. He is married and has one dautriiiei'. He 



resid. 

going 

]\Ir 

repuli 

Su-ed 



sided 
help,.. 



d fol- 
io fl 

. Obei 
lican 
i.sh M 



il.a. Ida Oberg is at home, 
•g gives his political allegiance to the 
party, and holds membership with the 
issiou church, of wliich he was one of 
eis, and is one of the few surviving 

that organization. Mr. Oberg has rc- 
is (ounty for fortv-two vears, and has 
uake it what it is today". He was for 
an active agi-ieiiltiirist, but since lyOo 
is home in Priie^'-ton township, where 
■njoyiiig a well cariLxl rest, being one 

known and highly respected citizens 
f that township but also of Fiureau 



GLK.XXl S. PlllLLirs. 

Glenni S. Phillips is a self-made man, who, 
starting out in life on his own account empty 
handed, has accumulated a very desirable compe- 
tence and is now the owner of an excellent farming 
property in ^\■alnut township. He was born in this 
township, September 3, ISGG, and is a son of 
Alonzo J. and Alzina Phillips. The father, a 
native of Warren countv. Pennsvlvania, was born 
August 28, 1833, and died October 10, 18i)7, at 
the age of si.xty-four years. His wife was a native 
of Ohio. They became residents of Illinois iu 
18o7, settling iu Walnut township, where for many 
years the father successful!) carried on general 
agricultural pursuits^ there residing until 1805, 
when he retired from active business cares and re- 
moved to the city of Princeton, where he made his 
home until he was calh.'d to his final rest, and 
where his widow yet resides. 

Glenni S. Phillips was reared on the old home- 
stead farm, under the parental roof, amid the re- 
fining influences of a good home. His education 
was acquired in the Bunker Hill district school, 
and his training at farm labor was not meager, for 
at an early age he took his place in the fields and 
followed the plow or the harrow and later aider! in 
the task e,f eultivating and of iiarvesting the crops. 




Mi;. A\J) .Mi;s. S.ULL'KL OilEKG, 



PAST AND PliKSKNT OF BUPKAU COL'X'JY. 



Tliroughout his eiUiiv lil'e ho has carried oJi gen- 
eral agricultural pursuits, and is now the owner 
of a valuable properly of two hundred and twenty- 
two and a half acres of land on sections 28, 21 
and 22, AValnnt township, worth from one hun- 
dred and twenty-five to one hundred and fifty dol- 
lars per acre. This is one of the best farn\s of the 
locality, being improved according to modern ideas 
of agrieultiu-al progress and development. Mr. 
Phillips also owns one of the best threshing and 
corn-sheller outfits in the county, and, in fact, is 
regarded as one of the most prosperous and pro- 
gressive farmers of his township. All modern fa- 
cilities and conveniences are found upon liis place, 
which is altogether attractive in its appearance be- 
cause of the air of neatness and thrift which per- 
vades it. 

On the 31st of May, 1803, was celebrated the 
marriage of Mr. Phillips and Miss Anna L. Dunn, 
who was born May 21, 1873. They have become 
tlie parents of three children: Hazel S., born Sep- 
tember 27, 189-1; Inez E., February 21, 1901, and 
Iva G., January IG, 190G. 

Mr. Phillips gives his political allegiance to the 
republican party, and lias served as school director 
for four years, but has not been active in politics 
in tlie sense of office seeking. He is, liowever, in- 
terested in all that pertains to national progress 
and local advancement, and in community affairs 
has taken a helpful interest. He belongs to Garri- 
son No. 81 of the Kniglits of the Globe, and his 
wife holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal 
church in Walnut. They are botli well known in 
tlie county where their entire lives have been passed 
and where they have so lived as to win and merit 
the good will and tru?t of those with whom tliey 
have been associated. 



CUAPr.ES W. GUXKEL. 

The name of Gunkel is inseparably interwoven 
with the comme'-cial history of fcTi'^iTield, and as 
represented by grandfather, father and son, it has 
always stood for business intcgricy and enterprise. 
For many years a general store was here con- 
ducted by the succeeding generations of the fam- 
ily, continuing from 1857 until 1900. when Charles 
W. Gunkel sold out, and is now living retired. 

His grandfather, George Gunkel was born in 
Pnitlcr county, Ohio, October K', 1814, and was 
a son of John and Catherine (Beakles) Gunkel, 
who wore natives of Pennsylvania and ".-ere of Gor- 
man descent. George Gunkel wis reared upon a 
farm in Ohio to the age of seventeen years, when 
he began learning the v.'heehvrisrht's trade, which 
he after\,-ard followed for nine yea'-s. Ho then 
took up carpentering, and was identified Avith 
building interests until after he came to this coun- 
ty. For two years after leaving Ohio he was a 
resident of Carroll county, Indiana, and subse- 
quently he resided in Tippecanoe county Indiana, 



until his rciiHisal to Bureau coun y in Irsoo. The 
following year he erected a businjss h.ouse for him- 
self in Slielfu'ld and established a go Krai mer- 
cantile store, which ho conducted until his death, 
making him the oldest business man of Sheffield in 
years of continuous connection with commercial 
interests. He also conducted a lumber business for 
a number of years, and was thus an active factor 
in the trade circles of the town, while his reputa- 
tion in business circles placed him among tho fore- 
most of those who have the unqu ilificd confidence 
of the trading public. Moreover ho was both the 
architect and builder of his own fortunes, for he 
started out in life empty-handed, placing his de- 
pendence upon lis energy, firm ri,solution and 
willingness to work. 

George Gunkel was married in Indiana, Febru- 
ary 24, 1837, to Miss Sarah Islev, who was born 
near Dayton, Ohio, while her parents were natives 
of Virginia and of German descent. They had 
two children: Daniel A. and Catherine, the latter 
the widow of Charles H. Bovden and a resident 
of Sheflield. Thj mother died May 14, 1885, and 
the father's death occurred in Novembei of the 
same rear. 

Daniel A. Gunkel, who becaiue his father's suc- 
cessor in business, was born in Jiidi'^na, July 24, 
1840, and was ecliicaled Ln the public schools of 
that state and of Sheffield. He thai joined his 
father in business, and after the latter's death 
conducted the store until his d-j.ith, maintaining 
his place as a leading and representative merchant 
of the city. He built a two-story brick block in 
188S, twenty-six by one hundred feet, upon the 
site of his father's store, and ho kept in touch 
with the trend of modern progress along commer- 
cial lines. He was a valued and prominent mem- 
ber of Ames lodge. No. 142, A., F. and A. M., 
in which ho filled ail tlie chairs, and he also 
held meml.eisliiii with the M.mL.vu Woodmen of 
America. 

Daniel A. Gunkel was married January 1, 18Go, 
to Annie A. Blake, of Concord, Vew Uainpshire, 
who was born December 11, 184.7, a daughter of 
Charles W. Blake, a merchant of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, and of Concord, New .''lampshire. Mr. 
Gunkel departed !his life February PS, 189-5, and 
his wife died March 5, 190G. 

Charles W. Gunkel, their only son, born Sep- 
tember 2.5, 1867, was educated in the Sheffield 
schools and a business college at Davenport, Iowa, 
and thus qualified for the responsibilities of a busi- 
ness career he joined his father iti tho store, which 
they conducted together until the de>'th of Daniel 
A. Gunkel. He was afterward with a partner for 
two years, at the end of which time the stock was 
divided and Mr. Gunkel carried on general mer- 
chandising alone until 1900, when ho retired from 
the trade, his attention nov,- being devoted to the 
sui)ervision of his invested interests. 

On the 2d of September, 1890, was celebrated 
the marriage of C. W. Gunkel and iliss Ada 



G(io PAST A.vi) 1'i;hsi:.\'|- of iiLKi'Ar curx'i'V. 

Soiilua \Vo.»l, or Slirllii'ld, wli . ua. !.(,rii Juh occuiml Ottober 11, ls!is, \\l„.|i li,, was sesviuv- 

21, KsiJii, a (lau.uiutr of .la-^]irr \V(.m,|, mcntioiicil si\ years of agr, for is-.':', was hi-- jiatal year. ![,. 

elsewlieiv ill this woik. Mr. in.] .M r> lluulcol luraiiie the owikt i,f ili.' ,,1,1 Ii,,nic fann. ul„-,v 

now liav,. ,,u,' rliihl, W.MHluai' William, l,„ni his father settl-d, aii,l li,' liv.,1 up..n thai j.hur 

April l.J, LS'J]. Mr. (Iiiiik,! is a Mas„n, beh.iig- fn,m ISnr,, w!i,.n tlie hou.se was huiit tliere, until 

ing to Ames lodge, X,,. \V>. at Shelhehl, and to his ,I,Mtli. II,' ,iveted the residence which is now 

the chapter No. '28 ari,l e,.ini,iai„],iT No. "20, at stau,nng ai.,1 al.-u a large brick dwelling, which 

Princeton. He is n,,w tivaMir, r ■,( the lodge, hav- is one of the tlii,'.-i countrv homes iu the couiiiv 

ing succe,',l,-,l Iiis fatlnT, wh,, ha,l filled tlio posi- Tli,^ farm is w,'ll iin[,r,,v, ,1 and its boundari,'S liave 

tion for years. Unlike in d,tail ami environment, been extended until it lunv comprises three hiin- 

_ owing to tlie changing conditions of the times, dred acres of very rich and productive land, l>,in- 

■ there has nevertheless been much tliat is similar considered ime o"f the best farms of the cimu" 

in the lives of tlie three Gunbls who have been It lies on sections 22, 27 and 2G, Dover l(,wnslii"[,. 

so prominently identified with the commercial ac- and n,, ei|uipment of a model farm is there lack- 

tivity aiul the growth and piusperitv of ShcfTield. ing. In his political allegiance Josepli H. lirig- 

AU have been reliable, enterprising business men, ham was alwavs a republican, unfaltering in his 

iivter<?sted in the development of tlie city to tlie aiK,.,aiy of tfie principles of the partv. and he 

extent of giving hearty co-operation to many move- held all of tli,' t,.unshij) ofnces, including that of 

monts for the public good, and they have wrought supervisor. In earlv manliood he wedded iliss 

along lin,.-s worthy of emulation. " Jane lOlizabeth :\liivi'r, wh,, eaine t,, Illiii,,i-^ fi,,m 

Ohio during the pioiuvr epmli in tli,' hi~t<,rv of 

this state. This uiii,,n was bl,'.ss,.,l \ulh si'veii 

ehihlivn, four, .full, ,111 survive, iiamelv : Svlv,.>ter, 
•lOSKl'II A. r.b'K.IlAM. who ,s ivtin,! and liv,- in Princeton"; Mr.^. Sarah 
Joseph A. ISrigliani, n,,w livino- m Prin,:et,:.u, is Ki-i,k, »li,,~,. h,,i,i,. i,- north of Princel,,u; J,.- 
a retired farmer and a represeiilative of a iii,jii,-er -^epli .\. ; and Mr.-. i:iiza r.artlev. id' s,.utli,'ni Kan- 
family of 1832. His binh ,X'Cnrr,'d in ]),>ver ^as. The iii,,th,M- of the.-^e ehi'blivn ,li,',l in Is]! 
township, r.ureau eonntv. in ISUl, his parents :i'i,l Mv. ISrighaiii afterwar,! married L'anie Dun- 
being J,_,s,.pli II. an,l .laii,' Elizabeth (:\[ercer) bar, of P.ureau county, Illin.ii^. The\ b,-eam,' the 
Brigdiam, th,' f,,iiii,T a native of Xew Hampshire, parents of two children: Charles, iii.u ,,f Iowa; 
and the latter of Old,,. In 1832 J,,sep]i H. P.rig- and Curtis, of Kansas. 

ham with one of his brothers and tb,dr fatlie'r, J,->sepli A. P,righam, wlios..^ naim- inir,,du,es tlii> 

Joseph P.righam, came to Putnam i.-ountv, Illi- n-eonl, was reared upon th,' home I'anu. ,-,,iiipIeied 

nois, where they lived until after the I'.laek Hawk his duration in the Priu,,ton lii-h ^ih,,ol ami 

war. In 1833 they rem,,\e,l t,, I'.iuvau county, tlir,,uglioiit liis entiiv litV ha< f,,liow,'d fanning 

where Joseph P.righam, Sr.. s,;,-uivd a farm of on,' ami si,.,k-iai<ing. with tli,' e\,,pti,,ii ,,1 a v,.'a° 

hundred atid sixtv a,-r, s fr,,i,i ihe -,,\ernment. or tu ,> sp.'iit in Chiea-o. v. li.iv ]„■ wa.- ,'ii.M",-d in 

This land i- still in p,;,-ses>i„n of th- familv. being the ival e>tat,' bii.in.^-s. II,. ,> a bn.Mb-r .^f tin,' 

now own,',] bv .lo.eph P.riuham of this review. Hiavfor,! eatti,-, J,-ts,.v iv,1 li,,-- and tine ,lraft 

The journey to Illiimis fr,.m Xew IIam]i.sliire ha,l Imrses. He emplov, a'man up,.n the farm, uliieh 

been made in- team and canal, ami th.'v w,'re ele\ en is hxate,! four an',1 a half mihs fr,,m l'!iii,-,'ton, 

weeks upon the way. J,isei,li II. P.righam was but he gives u> ihr w,,rk hi. peiM.nal .^up.uvi- 

then a youth of ten v,'ais. Tln' eoinitr\- was at si,)n. an,l is an active, eni'ru,'ti,' auii, ulturist ,,f 

that tiine a vast praiii,' atul wildi-riie.-s iuul onlv soiiml business Judo-meni and pr,.i;r,'^-i\e spirit, 

here and lluue lia,l tli,' sc.mIs of civili/ati,,n l»_'en In January, lS!)(CiIr. r.ri-baui «a- uiarri,'d t,, 

planted, as some venturesome settler or pioneer ^[i>s Martha ^'il■■ll■n, a ,laiiglit,-r i>f K,l\\ar,l P,,,' 

had made his way through the borders of civiliza- ami Anna (Th,>mp-,iii ) \'ir,l,ii. Th,' fatlu'r was 

tion in the older cast and taken up his abode upon b,.rn in X,,rwi,h. ^Muskimiiini , ,>uiit\. Old,,, Mar, h 

the frontier to aid in reclaiming it for the uses 23, 1S3<>, an,l is a S',n ,>r .liium,' an, I Sarah 

of the white race. Joseph Brigham, Sr., was at (Fleming) ^■ir,l,•^, l.,itii ,,f wImiu were natives of 

one time a member of the legislature in Xew Ohio. The fatlu'r was fi,r y.ais engag,'il in th,' 

Hamiishire and was a pr,,min,-nt and intPu'iitial sho,> husin,'ss in his iiati\,- state but later beeaim- 

citizen well fitted for lea,lei>hip. II,' l,ft the im- a >',,ntia,'t,,r on th,' Paltiim.iv \- (»hi,i Pailn.a,!, 

press of his individuality up,.n the eaily ,lev,:'lop- ,h,ing work ab.ng th,' hills ,.f th,' Obi,. ri^,-r. 

ment of this section of the state and tlirough his I'pou the completion of the contract lie r,'mo\,',l 

farming interests contriliuted to -its materiafprog- witli his family to ilouiit Pleasant, Iowa, making 

ress. Joseph TI. P.righam. rearcl upon tlie fron- the journey by team, ami tliere he an,l his wif.- 

-tier amid pioneer en\ ir,.iun,'nts. was educated in died many'years ag... Ililward loie \'ir,l,'n spi'ut 

the common .seh,„,I>. ,'njoyin.L' -u, h a,lvantages as his bovhoo,! and v,)uih in Old,,, and in ]>.")l a,- 

were to be ha,I at that time. Ur spent his entire compani,?d his pan'uis ,.n tli,'ir r.im.v.il t,. M,>unt 

life from the aL',' of t.'ii v.'ars up,.n what is known Pl,'a>ant. Iowa. Aft.'r a \,'ar, h,>w,'V,'r, h,' cam,' 

as the .-,1,1 Pri-bam h.,m,"'stead ami th.re liis death to Prim-,ton ,,n a visit t,," his uiul,'. P. I.aird, a 



^ 



/ 



V. 



ij. A.RRiGM'V 



FAST AND rilKSKXT Or BUKKAU I'OL'NTY 



CG3 



st of til 



lie 



, aihl ,kvi.lc.l t.. IV 
socuml a siluatini, as cleik in tliu haixhwirc .<ln,v 
oi' A. S. & ]■;. C. CliaiJiaan and Loutiiiiinl in ihrii 
employ for six years. Later he purchased an in- 
terest in the store and afterward became sole 
projirietor, conducting the business successfully 
until he sokl out in 1ST6. In 1863 he enlisted in 
tlie army for one hundred days' service as a nieni- 
ber of Company A, Sixty-ninth iri-'inient of Illi- 
nois A'olunteers. and \v,is\(.iiiiiii,"innr,l lirutciiaut. 
On the expiration of thai p-ri.Hl Ii,. rmunrd h,.i,,,. 
but in ISd-i li,, lais.'J a coniiuuv at I'nn.vl-n, 
whirh iMTaiiie C.uiii.anv A. One' ]luiid.vd and 
Tluny-uinlh ];cL;in,r„t uf Illinois Voluiu.vrs. lie 
was coniinissioncd captain of this company and 
with tlie regiment was nuHtend into service at 
Peoria in June, 1804. lie wa~ actively engaged 
in duty in ^lissouri and Ken(ii(];y. rolli)uing TJcn- 
cral Prirr, who ^vas making a raid tliiou-h tli,,sc 
states, lie served out his term of enli<liMeiit and 
returned home, lia\ing been mustered out in Xo- 
vember. ISiM. Tn ISTG Captain Virden and Cap- 
tain Clark Grey ]iui-chascd the controlling inteivst 
in the Farmers National Bank at Princeton, wliieli 
had been organized a year or two before. ;\Ir. \ii-- 
den became president and Captain Giw ea.-liiiT. 
The dividends of the liauk had about ]iaid for the 
original stock and Captain Yirden siii'rendeied 
his presidency in 1891. He also dealt in real 
estate quite largely and was the owner of between 
five and six thousand acres of land in Kansas and 
Nebraska, togetlici- with about three hundred acres 
in Bureau county, Illinois. T'oliiieally he was a 
stanch republican and wa- a m-iulier of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity. 

Un the ^Cth of April. ISGO. Mr. Yirden wa.s 
married to .Mi^. Anna Thompson, of Cambridge. 
Ohio, and the maniage wa.- graced with four chil- 
dren, but their onl} sou, E. L., died at the age of 
seventeen years. The daughters are: Xcllic K., 
the wife of Charles Sapp, of AVyanet township. 
Bureau co'unty; and IMartha and Mary, twins, the 
former the wife of ilr. Brisham. ^Fr. Mnlen 
died July 19. IDiU. and his widow is still living 
with her dauuhter :\Iarv in T'riin-eton. He uas 



eliai.le and 



a man of excellent 
straightforward in all his d.aliliu-. and in citizen- 
ship in days of peace he inaiiire>ied the same lov- 
alty whicli lie displayed when 141011 the battletlelds 
of the south. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bri-hani have one dauuhter, Dm-- 
othv Mav. born Maieli l.s, is-.is. Tliev hold m.'in- 
ber.ship in the Methodist Kpr-eopal' diurch. in 
which lie is acting as an usher, as a member of the 
church board, as ii.ssistant siipeiinlemlent of the 
Sunday school and as president of tie' Ppwrnth 
League. He is an untiring and zealoiK w(uker in 
the churcir, doing nntch for its ad\aneemeiii. 
growth and influence, ami his labors are ed'ective 
and far reaching. In polities lie is a republican 
and is now servin::: as alderman of the fourth 
ward in Prineeton.' He i^ a man of broad mind 



Mini liberal tliouuht. who recognizes that mairs 
aeliulies ^iiuul.l toneh the vai-i.. us inleiv,.t> of ^o- 
ciely, and he has thus beeome a factor in the ma- 
terial. ],oliii,al and moral pivgre.s of liis com- 
munity. He re.-i.l.s at Xo. -i-Hi l-:im street, in 



ALBKPT BOXXKLl,. 

Among the representatives of the farming inter- 
ests of P.iireaii county is Albert Bomiell. who was 
born in La .M..ille. August 1, ISoO. His parents 
were Silas and ilary Ann (Smith) Bonii.qi. The 
father, whose birth oecurred in Bedford coiinty, 
Pennsylvania, came to Bureau county m is.'il, 
bringing with him his family. He harj been mar- 
ried in 1812 to Miss Mary Atui Smith, also a 
native of Bedford county, and as the years passed 
ten cliildren were born unto them, of whom Albert 
is the seveiitli in ord.'r of birth. Tlie father and 
three of the sons .erved in the Civil war, and unlv 
one returned, the otln'i's giving their lives in de- 
fense of the I'nion cause upon the altar of their 
country. 

Albert Bonnell, reared in the county of his 
natiiity. is indebted to its public school system for 
the educational privileges he enjoyed in his boj-- 
hood and youth. He was early left fatherless, and 
in his minority his portion was largely that of hard 
and unremitting labor. After he attained man's 
estate he sought a companion and helpmate for 
life's journey, and was married to Miss Julia A. 
Craft, who was boru in Stark county, Illinois, 
February 1.5, 185S, and died on the 10th of May, 
18S1. They became the parents of two children, 
of whota one died in infancy, while Mrs. Ida Boss 
still survives. 

In order to provide for his family Mr. Bonnell 
followed farming, and is now the owner of one 
hundred and fifty and a half acres of choice land, 
upon which are substantial buildings, standing in 
the midst of fine sliade trees, which add to the 
value and beauty of the place. His farm com- 
prises one of the fine locations of tlie county, and 
IS attractive in its neat and thrifty appearance. 
Mr. Bifiinell is now engaged in raising Poland 
China Imgs, and also buys and feeds cattle, using 
the produrts of his fields in this way. 

He votes with the republican partv, and in re- 
ligious faith is a Methodist, belonging to the 
church of that denomination in La IMoille. Truly 
a self-made man, he gained his start in the busi- 
ness world by working by tlu.' month as a farm 
hand, and after making purcliasc of land he 
labored diligently and persistently, allowing no 
obstacle to bar his path if it could" be overthrown 
by industry and detennination. He is today one 
of the leading and prosjieroiis farn\ers of the coun- 
ty, and is a man trusted and esteemed by friends 
ami neitrbbors. He is assessor of liis township at 



C64 



TAST AND rJIKSE.XT OF JiLliKAU COU-NTV. 



the prcseut writing ami has been seliuol director 
for a niunber of vears. The cause ui cdueation 
finds m him a warm and stalwart friend, and he 
withholds his support from no movement for the 
general good. He has ably fought life's battles 
and has come ofl" victor in the strife, and today 
he possesses not only a good farming property, but 
also an honorable name, his record being in har- 
mony with his professions as a muiubor of the 
church. 



JAMES WAUGH. 

James Waugh is now living retired in Prince- 
ton. For many years he was one of the best knoAvn 
stockmen, not only of Bureau county but of cen- 
tral lllinuis as well, and the extent and impor- 
tance of his business interests in this connection 
gained him a place among the substantial resi- 
dents of the count}', bringing to him a measure of 
prosperity that now enables him to leave the more 
arduous duties of an active business career to 
others, while he enjoys a well earned rest. 

His natal day was November 19, 1S33, and the 
place of his birth Somerset county, Pennsylvania. 
His parents, James and Elizabeth Jane (Parks) 
Waugh, removed from West Virginia to Peimsyl- 
vania at au early day and the father served as a 
soldier in the war of 1812, while both tlic pater- 
nal and maternal grandfathers of our subject were 
soldiers of the Eevolutionary war. On going to 
the Keystone state James Waugh, Sr., became in- 
terested in stage lines there in early days before 
the era of railroad transportation and was one of 
the stockholders in the old stage line operating 
between Philadelphia and Pittsburg. He was con- 
nected with that business there for several years 
and on coming to the west he brought with him 
some of the old stages that had been used in that 
section of the country. Locating in Springfield, 
Illinois, he operated a stage line between that city 
and Chicago for se\eral years and on selling out 
he removed to Peru, La Salle county, Illinois, 
where he purchased the old National Hotel, which 
he began conducting. At the same time he also 
operated quite extensively in land, v>-hich he 
bought and sold. He was very successful in both 
lines of business for several years or until he 
made a large loan of twenty-two thousand dollars 
to an old friend, who swindled him out of this 
amount, so that he lost most of his earnings of 
former years. He still retained large landed in- 
terests but, this being unimproved property, he 
derived no income therefrom. He left Peru and 
went to Lost Grove in La Salle county, twelve 
miles from Peru, purchasing all of the land at that 
grove, where he owned an entire section. His 
house and another dwelling were the only ones in 
that vicinity and at one time Daniel Webster was 
entertained at the Waugh home. With character- 
istic energy ilr. Waugh set to work to retrieve 
his lost possessiors, cleared his land and began 



farjiiing. He also becam.; interested in the old 
plank road between Peru and Dixon and, mal'ing 
his home at Lost Grove, he carried on general 
farming and stock-raising there until his death, 
which occured in 1862, while his wife survived un- 
til 1SG3. There were fourteen children in their 
famil}', nine of whom are now deceased. Most of 
them died in California save one son, who was 
murdered in this state. Of the five living mem- 
bers of the family three daughters reside in Los 
Angeles, California, while Piankin is engaged in 
the live-stock commission business in Chicago. 

James Waugh, whose name introduces tiiis rec- 
ord, attended the public schools of Peru, where 
he acquired a liberal education. After removing 
to Lost Grove he assisted his father on the farm 
and when only a boy he began dealing in stock 
himself, buying and trading and making ship- 
ments to the Chicago markets. As the years passed 
by he increased his operations in that line and en- 
gaged in business in the vicinity of his old home 
until 1857, when he went west to California, lo- 
cating in tlic southern part of that state, where he 
was engaged iu the stock business and in mining 
for five years. In 1SG2 he' returned to Illinois 
and settled in Princeton, where he began to buy 
and ship stock. Also noting a good opening for 
a meat market in Princeton, he established a busi- 
ness of that character and at one time owned and 
conducted two markets here, employing several 
men in the conduct of the business. He traveled 
all over Bureau county and this part of the state 
for many years, buying cattle and other stock, 
and at one time was regarded as the best judge of 
stock in Bureau county. During this period he 
also owned tv>o meat markets in Elnnvood, Peoria 
county, Illinois, which he conducted for a few 
years, carrying on an e.xtensive business in all of 
his retail establishments. 

ifr. Waugh was married in Chicago to Miss 
Elizabeth Wood, a native of Wyoming county, 
New York, and a daughter of Lewis and Soph- 
rouia Wood, who were natives of the Empire state 
and in 1815 removed to Illinois. For a short time 
they lived in Chicago and then became residents 
of Dupage county, Illinois, making the overland 
trip with ox teams. For four years they resided 
upon a farm in that county and then came to Bu- 
reau county, where Jlr. Wood purchased a farm 
in Dover township, carrying on general agricul- 
tural pursuits there until his death in 1863, at 
the age of forty-seven years. !Mrs. Wood died in 
Maiden at the advanced age of eighty years. She 
had two sons in the army, one of whom was in- 
jured at he front and died while in the hospital at 
Covington, Kentuck-v-. Mrs. Wood went south to 
care for him, remaining across the river from 
Covineton at Cincinnati, and while there she 
boarded in General Grant's home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Waugh became the parents of six 
children, of whom two arc now living. Frei], who 
married Ida Burn< of Kankakee. Illinois, nnw 



i r \ 



\ ' 



JA:\[ES WAUGII. 



PAST AND TJiKSKXT 01' Ji 



;kal' col'-XTy 



Gcr 



lives in Davc'iijiort, loua, vvIiltc he is iiiaua,i;er of 
tlie T. A. Wood creaimTV. Gerlriuk' is the wife 
of Henry A. ]\[eacl, manager for the Intirua- 
tional Salt Company in Chicago. Those deceased 
are: Grace, who died at the age of eigliteen years 
and six months; one wlio died unnamed in in- 
fancy ; Bertlia. who pas.-ed awav when eight months 
ohl:"and Katie when fciir mciiths old. 

Mr. Waiigh continued to en-age in the stock 
business in this county umil 1!hiii, wlu.ii hi' de- 
termined to put aside the arduous duties and la- 
bors of an active business career and live retirtd. 
but indolence and idleness are utterly foreign to 
his nature and he cannot content himself without 
some business interests. He therefore travels to 
some e.xtent. over the county and docs a little buy- 
ing and selling. He has never cared for public 
otKce nor has he held positions of political prefer- 
ment. He \otes with the democracy wliero na- 
tional questions are involved, Imt at loeal eleeiinn-: 
casts an independent ballot. 'J'liis work would bo 
incomplete without the record of the AN'au-h fam- 
ily, one of the most prominent of Bureau (Oimt}. 
for during many years Mr. Wangh has been a 
most successful business man and a recognized 
leader in live-stock interests. He owns a nice 
home at Xo. 40i South Pleasant street, where he 
and his wife reside, and the labors of his former 
years make it possible for liim to enjoy all of 
life's comforts and man}- of its luxuries, while 
.his career demonstrates the ])0ssibiliries of the 
simultaneous attainment of success and an hon- 
ored name. 



• HAP?>[OX E. CL'irns. 

Conducting business interests in harmony with 
modern ideas of commercial progress, watchful of 
every opportunity pointing to success, and utilizing 
every honorable means at hand for the ilevclop- 
nient of his trade interests, Harmon E. Curtis is 
now meeting with merited prosperity as a dealer 
in lumber, building materials and coal in Tiskilwa. 
He has thus been identified with the commercial 
interests of the town since December, IfiOO, and 
is the only lumber dealer here. 

One of Bureau county's native sous, his l)irth 
occurred in Sheffield iu 18-3t, his father being 
James M. Curtis, now deceased. He was born at 
Schaghtieoke, Eennselaer countv, Xew "^'nrk, Au- 
gust 2, 1822, a son of Daniel and Mehitalde (Mas- 
ters) Curtis, also natives of the Empire state. 
They removed to Otsego county, Xew York, about 
1823, but in 1S37 returned to the vicinity of their 
old home in Rensselaer county. A farmer by oc- 
cupation, Daniel Curtis followed that pursuit in 
order to provide a livelihood for his familv, con- 
tinuously' carrying on the work of the fields save 
for the period of his service as a soldier of the 
war of 1812. He died in Xew York, while his wife 
passed away in Davenport. Ton a. wh. n nearly 
eighty-seven years of age. In tb.eir family weiv 



nine childreu: i-ha.lus, Abndiam, Jam-s M., 
-Mark 1)., llannou Jl.. I'liiueas, Kobert C, Maria 
and Cyntliia ('. 

^ Janu'S M. Curtis was reared upon a farm iu the 
Empire state, and at the age of sixteen years began 
working for others at a salary of seven dollars per 
month, wdiicli was given tor the support of the 
family. He afterward ietiii-iied to the home place 
and assisted in the eulti\atinii of his father's farm 
until he reached the age of twenty years. His ed- 
uratiou was a^jiiii-ed in tlie public schools of Xew 
York and in the arad.aiiy at West Poultney, Ver- 
mont, so that he was well liti.-d for teaching' which 
occupation lie l)egaii following wlicn uiiift.^-i' vears 
of age. 'J'hr vear L^IS wini.'.M.J his ainviil iu 
Illinois, at whieli time lie located iu Adam.- eounty, 
where he had two uncles living. For throe winter 
seasons ami one sumiiu>r he was engaged in teach- 
ing school there, and in the fall of 1840 joined his 
lirother Mark on a prospecting tour for land. They 
proceedeil by stcaml)oat from Quincy to St. Louis 
and thence to Peoria, where they started on foot 
for a trip through Bureau county, and after choos- 
ing a location they walked to Hixon, where tlie 
government laiid offier' was locate.]. They made 
their entries and tlioiiee proceed^.] in the same 
manner of travel to (hiiiiey. Tiieii' -rlci tion was a 
section of land in Ci.hu.h-iI t':'Wiisliip, the L'.aim of 
dames Curtis eoxeiii.g the soutlu'ast (pi.trter of 
section 18 and the southwest fpiarter of slhiucid IT, 
while bis broiluT .-eeiii-ed the iiortle'ast and north- 
west qiiarlei.- of the same sections. Iu the spring 
of 1840 llicy had taken a trip into Iowa to see 
the country, walking from Qiiiiuy to Xauvoo, 
where they crossed the river and th'-nce proeeeded 
oil foot to iluscatin", where they embarked on a 
steamer for Quincy. 

On the 15th of December. 18.-)' i. James Curtis 
was mnrriod to Miss Helen Maria Steveii,--"n, who 
lived in Adams county, about tea miles east of 
Quincy. She was born in Carroll county. Mary- 
land, February T, 1831, a daughter of Basil D. and 
Henrietta (Wells) Stevenson, who came with their 
family to Illinois in 1837. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Curtis were born six children: Clifton, now of 
Davenport, Iowa; Harmon E. ; Jessie May, the 
wife of Clayton C. Pervier, of Bureau eounty; 
Charles Edgar, living on the home farm ; Helen 
ilaria, wlio died at the age of nineteen years, and 
Carrie Belle, the widow of Bradford Peed Battey, 
of Tiskilwa. The mother passed away Xovember 
7, 1871, and on the 9th of January. i87S, James 
M. Curtis married iliss ^Maria C. Rice, of Han- 
nibal, Oswego county, X'ew Y'ork. There was one 
.son of this union, Robert Rice Curtis. In the 
spring of 1851 the father located upon his land, 
bringing with him to the county a capita! of two 
hundred and fifty dollars. He built a small house 
of lumber, most" of which was sawed at Stepheus 
mill, and he occupied his first dwrlling ur.n"! dur- 
ing the period of the Civil w,ir. v.Iumi h-' erected 
the iv-idriiee now standing on flie place. There 



668 



PAS'J' AND riJKSEXT OF llUKFAU (JUL-.\TY. 



he engaged iu general fanning and feeJiug stock, 
and his farm today is one of the best cultivated 
properties of Concord towusKip. lie resided con- 
tinuously in that township from ISol, and be- 
came one of tile extensive landholders, owning one 
thousand acres of fine land in Concord township 
and seven hundred acres in Gold township. Be 
rose from a humble financial position until he was 
one of the wealthy citizens of the county, and the 
most envious could not grudge him his success, 
80 honorably was it won. A republican in his po- 
litical views, he served for nine years as super- 
visor of Concord township, and was actively and 
helpfully interested in numy progressive public 
movements. He was a member of the Unitarian 
churdi of Sheffield and a man who merited and 
enjoyed the lughest respect of all with whom he 
came in contact, so that his death, which occurred 
in July, 1902, was the occasion of deep and wide- 
spread regret. His record, however, compassed al- 
most four score years, and his life was one of use- 
fulness, activity and honor. 

Harmon E. Curtis, educated in the schools of 
Sheffield, remained at home until ISSG, his time 
and energies being devoted to farming. He then 
went to Union county, Iowa, where he remained 
for two years, after which he was engaged in the 
lumber business for five years at Arcadia, Nebras- 
ka. The succeeding two and a half years were 
passed as a lumber merchant at North Platte, Ne- 
braska, and, returning to Arcadia, he was engaged 
in the banking business there for a year. In 1895 
he again took up his abode at ShefTield, where he 
remained until his removal to Tiskilwa in 1899, 
when he purchased the lumber yard of B. K. Bat- 
tey and has since been accounted one of the leading 
business men of this town. He deals in lumber, 
lath, doors, windows, shingles, lime and cement, 
as well as hard and soft coal, and is conducting 
an extensive and profitable business, having now 
a liberal patronage. He also owns two hundred 
and twenty acres of land in Concord township and 
personally gives his supervision to the operation 
of the farm. 

Mr. Curtis was married in 1878 to ]\Iiss Jennie 
Moore, of ShefTield, a daughter of D. G. ^loore, 
an old settler of Bureau county, now living with 
Mr. Curtis. They have two children: Ma'rk D., 
twenty-six years of age, who married Clara Booth, 
of Sheffield, and lives in Tiskilwa with his father, 
and Claudia, twenty-four years of age, the wife 
of Claude I. Eing, a mail carrier of Tiskilwa. 

Mr. Curtis is a stalwart advocate of republican 
principles, hut has never consented to hold office. 
He belongs to Ames lodge, No. 155, A. F. i!t 
A. M., of Tiskilwa, also the Odd Fellows society 
and the Modern Woodmen camp of Sheffield, while 
in Tiskilwa he is identifcd with the Domestic 
Guild and the Fastern Star, and both he and his 
wife have taken the Eebekah degree in Odd Fel- 
lowship. They have a very w-ide and favorable 



acquaiutanL-e, not only in Tiskilwa, but in other 
parts of the county, and are valued representatives 
of the community. In an analyzation of his char- 
acter it will be seen that enterprise is perhaps Mr. 
Curtis' dominant trait, and he is a prominent busi- 
ness man who has found that success is ambition's 
answer. 



THOMAS E. V/OOD. 

Thomas I]. Wood, a manufacturer of ice cream, 
with a factory in Princeton and one at Earlville, 
La Salle county, Illinois, is numbered among the 
native sons of this state, his birth having occurred 
in Boone county on the 15th of March, 1844. His 
father, Jacob A. AVood, was born in Canada, and 
became a citizen of the United States through the 
constitutional amendment of 1848. He was a 
blacksmith by trade, and for many years followed 
that pursuit in ;McHenry county, Illinois. 

Thomas E. Wood lived in his native county until 
March, 1802, when he came to Princeton, where 
he has since resided. His education was acquired 
in the public schools, and in his youth he learned 
the blacksmith's trade, which he foUov^'cd to the 
age of twenty-six years, after which he devoted 
fifteen years to general farming. He met with 
fair success in that undertaking, and on selling 
his farm he turned his attention to the creamery 
business as representative of the Elgin Creamery 
Company. Seeking a still broader field of labor, 
and one that he believed would prove more advan- 
tageous to him, he came to Princeton in the fall 
of 1891 and built an ice cream plant. In jMarch, 
1892, he removed to this city, and has been op- 
erating his plant since that time. In the spring 
of 1905 he further extended the scope of his labors 
by the establislunent of a plant in Earlville, Illi- 
nois, and he is now conducting an extensive and 
profitable trade. He makes shipments to various 
parts of the county, and his output covers a large 
territory. His extensive trade is indicative of the 
excellent quality of his produL-t, and he justly 
merits the success which is attending his elTorts 
in this direction. 

On November 10, 1SG9, Mr. Wood was married 
to Miss Isabelle Sinton, of ilcllenry county, Illi- 
nois, who was born in 1844. Her parents were of 
Irish descent, and members of the Societj- of 
Friends. In 1832 they located in ^IcHenry coun- 
ty, where they took up government laud and con- 
tinued to make their home throughout the remain- 
der of their lives, dying in 1892. Mr. and Mrs. 
Wood now have one son, Frank E., who is a 
painter and contractor in Grinnell, Iowa. He 
married iliss Nellie Morris, of Grinnell. and they 
have one child, Wilbur. 

Mr. Wood is well known in political circles as an 
advocate of republican principles, and in 1899 and 
1900 he represented the third ward of Princeton 
on the board of aldermen. He belongs to Peace 
lod.'r. No. 12S. I. 0. 0. F.. in which he has passed 



PAST AXl) 1' 



;i;xT OF Bui;j:Ar cul'xtv. 



GCO 



all of tlie chairs and in the wurk of wIulIi he 
takes a ver}- active aTid helpful part. lie is also 
a leading member in the encainpmeut, and is past 
errand patriarch. Ke has assisted in initiating 
more members into the lodge than any other man 
in Bureau county, and his identification with Odd 
Fellowship dates from ISSG, when he joined Big 
Thunder lodge, Xo. 2S, of Belvidere, Boone coun- 
ty, Illinois. lie also joined the encampment, the 
canton of Kewance and the Robekah lodge at Bel- 
videre, and he is deeply interested in this frater- 
nity and its growth and the accomplishment of its 
purposes. He is popular with its representatives 
in this part of the state, and in business circles 
he has made for himself an enviable name. 



MAX PAUL SEIP.EL. 

Among the citizens of Bureau county whose la- 
bors have directly and largely benefited the village 
of Manlius is numbered jMax Paul Scibel, cashier 
of the First State Bank of Manlius and treasurer 
of the New Bedford Creamery Company, lie also 
laid out an addition to the village, whereon are 
found the best business houses and finest residence 
section, and while promoting his individual inter- 
ests he has also contributed largely to geneial jirog- 
ress and prosperity. 

Born in Manlius township, April 8, ISGO, he is 
a son of J. Jacob Seibel, deceased, who was horn 
in Breidcnstein in the archduchy of Hesse, Ger- 
many, November 23, 1S16. He attended school the 
rec|uired number of years and then assisted his 
father on the farm. However, after the day's work 
was done he would walk to the adjoining village 
and attend the drawing school. "While yet a young 
man he learned engineering and for some time fol- 
lowed that business in his native country. In IS.'iO 
he came to the United States, hut being unable to 
speak English he found it impossible to secure a 
situation as an engineer in this country and for 
some time was employed as a carpenter in Ohio and 
later in St. Louis. He then went to California, 
attracted by the discovery of gold on the Pacific 
coast, and after a successful year in the mines re- 
turned to "the states'" by way of the isthnnis route. 
He remained in Pennsylvania for a short time and 
was there married to iliss Priseilla P. Follet, who 
was born in Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania, 
^March 4, 1S2S. The wedding was celebi-aleil Feli- 
ruary 9, 1852, after which they came Lmmediately 
to Bureau county, where Mr. Seibel first purchased 
one hundred and sixty acres of land in Manlius 
township, which he began to improve. Few men 
possessed more energy or stronger determination 
to win success in life, and hamls and brain were 
constantly at work. During the war, wlien it was 
diftlcult to employ labor, he began inventing and 
experimenting on labor-saving machines and was 
the first to begin building harvesters to carry bind- 
ers. He made them work successfully on his farm, 



but it was hard to iuiruduce new niacliiuca and be- 
fore this could be acconiiilishcd otliois had jiat- 
ierned after him and reaped the benefit of his 
genius, so that in the enterprise, instead of making 
money, he lost betwern thirty and forty thou.~aud 
dollars and finally the engine and machinery were 
put into the pla'nt of the Buda ilauufacturing 
Company and after the failure of that company 
the machinery was sold and Mr. Soibcl's estate re- 
ceived nothing. He Avas, however, successful as a 
farmer and stock-raiser and at the time of his 
death owned sixteen hundred acres of land in Bu- 
reau county. He and his son Frank were both 
killed in a railroad collision at Englewood, when 
on their wuv to Chicago with stock, ilarch 11, 
1880. 

In the family were twelve children: Celia K., 
who was born February 17, 18.J.3, and married 
George "\V. Beggs, of Glidden, Iowa; George E., 
who was born November 5, 1854, and married 
Eva McNaughtou; Chloo F., born November 15, 
185G; Charles H., born October 25, 1858; Fred, 
who was born August 6, ISGO, and died at the 
age of six months; Frank L., born November 21, 
18G1; Mark P., born November 27, 18G3 ; Clark 
J., born October 8, 1SG5; Herman M., who was 
born August 30, 1867, and died in August, 1SG8; 
Max P.; Lillv M., who was born Novendjer IC, 
1871, and died April 8, 1S75; and Karl B., horn 
April 30, 1S75. 

Max P. Seibel was educated in the common 
schools and in Elliott's Business College, at Bur- 
lington, Iowa, ■\\hich he attended until 1888. He 
then returned to the home farm and managed the 
estate until the spring of 1809, when he was ap- 
pointed deputy county treasurer, entering upon 
the duties of the office on the 1st of July and serv- 
ing until February, 1002, when he resigned and 
organized the First State Bank of Manlius, of 
which he was elected cashier on the 21st of March, 
1P02, the liank opening for business on the 14th 
of June of the same year, with 'William C. Dale 
as president. The directors arc William C. Dale, 
Max P. Seibel, F. J. Anderson, R. A. Lathrop 
and "W. S. Rudiger. The records of the baidc pre- 
sent a most creditable showing, for the institu- 
tion has been attended with success from the be- 
ginning, under the able management of 5Ir. Sei- 
bel. In other lines of business he has also been 
active and other enterprises have felt the stimu- 
lus of his co-operation and energy. He was secre- 
tary of the New Bedford Creamery Company until 
1890, when he resigned on becoming "deputy 
county treasurer. At the present writing he is 
treasurer of the creamery company. The town of 
Manlius owes much to his eft'orts for its improve- 
ment, as ho has laid out a fine addition, con- 
taining seventv'-soven lots, on which are four of 
the best brick business houses in the town as well 
as the finest residence portion. 

Mr. Seibel was married, December 1. 1S02, to 
Miss Emma E. Nelson, a dausrhter of Peter and 



670 



PAST AXli I'KKSKX'J- OF Jinn-AT tijlNTV 



KIU'U Nelt^dii, faniiiiiu' pcojilr of Maiiliiic; town- 
ship. Tliivo olillilroii w-oiv li.ii-ii to tllom, but 
Poarl James nnJ aiiothrr .Il.I iii iiilaiicv ami tlio 
mother died :\larLh 1, IS'.i'.i, ka\iii- a "son, Ulio 
Page, born Sfpti^iiiber 11, 18i'3. 

In politics Mr. Soibol is a ropidilieaii and takes 
an active interest in party work, desiring tlie suc- 
cess and adoption of its j)rinciples. He tilled the 
ofHce of town clerk for eiglit years and all pidjlic 
trusts reposed in him have been faithfully dis- 
charged. Fraternally he is connected with the 
Odd Fellows lodge at Xew Bedford, of which he is 
noble grand. Ilis entire life has been passed in 
this cotinty and his enterprise and energy have 
proven potent factors iu the progress and up- 
building of this conuaunity and at the same time 
a saurce of gratifying revenue to himself. All 
who know him esteem him and those who con;e 
within the closer circle of friendship have for 
him the warmest personal regard. 



...hip d. 



for 



.da lo. 
ulucl 
deae<,I 



RUBKirr FL'GE-\E WEP.l'.. 

Hubert Eugene Webb, a rcpre.-jeutative of tlie 
farming interests of Bureau county, is still living 
in Concord, his native township, where he was 
born April 15, 18?-,^ He i> a .-..n of Frank D. and 
Augusta M. Webb. I'lie father, a farmer by oc- 
cupation, came to lllini.u,- m ]s."i], arriving at 
Buda on the 12th of October. He journeyed 
westward from his former home at Skowhegan, 
JIaino, and here devoted his energies to general 
farming and stock-buying, becoming one of the 
leading business men of the community. 

Rubert E. Webb acquired his education in the 
schools of Buda and has devoted liis entire life 
to general agricultural pursuits, having received 
ample training in the w-ork of the fields through 
the period of his boyhood and 3"0uth when not 
busy with his te.xt books. The practical experi- 
ence which he thus gained has proved of immense 
value to him as he has managed his individual 
business interests. He now lives in Concord town- 
ship, where he operates one hundred and seventy- 
five acres of land, constituting a well improved 
and vahiable property. Ke is a breeder of Here- 
ford cattle and Poland China hogs. 

Mr. Webb was united in marriage to Miss Grace 
Curtis Mosher, a daughter of B. H. and Julia 
Mosher, of Buda. where the father is successfully 
engaged in merchandising. The wedding of Mr. 
and ^Irs. Webb was celebrated on the 4th of 
March, 1896, and has been blessed with one son, 
Frank Daniel Webb, born ^[arch 12, 1900. 

In his political views ilr. Webb is a stalwart 
republican, taking an active interest in the work 
of the party in botli county and state, and his ef- 
forts have been an active factor in its local suc- 
cesses, while his opinions have carried weight in 
its councils. He has acted as school director for 



nine ycar.s an- 

He is a prom 

339, A. F. & A. M.. at 11 

served as both junior ami 

junior warden. He is thoroughly in sympatliv 

with the teachings and tenets of the craft ami is 

recognized as one of the prominent representatives 

of its local lod-e. 



BEX.IAMIX F. WILLIAM.S. 

Beiij.uiim F. Williani-. dceea.ed, was well 
known in trade circles in Shetlield and Bureau 
county as an extensive dealer in grain. He was a 
self-made man who met with excellent success in 
his undertakings, being far-sighted and posses- 
sing good business judgment. His life record be- 
gan in Xew Jersey on the 29th of June, 1827, 
and in his youth he accomi)auied his jjaieiils ou 
their removal to Ohio, being engaged in merelian- 
dising at :\rer)onaldsville, that ^stat.-, for a lime. 
There he was marrie.l at tlie a-e of twentv-thrce 
vears tn ^l,-> Mariiaret C. Palmer, the ^eddin? 
being celebrated November 12, 185o. Mrs. Wil- 
liams vas born in Hagerstowu, ^laryland, Septem- 
ber 7, 1S32, but was only two years old when she 
accompanied her parents on their removal to 
Ohio, where she was reared. At the age of seven- 
ty-four years she is still hale and hearty and is 
an active member of the Unitarian church. 

Tn 18.52 Sir. Williams removed to the Iloosicr 
state and for four vears was engaged in merchan- 
dising at Lakesville, Indiana. At' the end of that 
period, thinking to enjoy better business oppor- 
tunities west of the Mississippi, lie made his way 
by wagon to Iowa, and passing through Sheflleld, 
Illinois, while en route for that state, he noted 
with interest the prospects of the little town. 
After two years spent in Iowa he returned to 
Sheflicld and for several years dealt extensively 
in furs, which he bought of the Indians through- 
out the state. He also engaged in tlie boot and 
shoe business for a few years and then entered 
the grain trade, which he conducted continuously 
and successfully up to the time of his demise, 
whicli occurred on the 22d of December, 1S94. 
Through his operations in grain he furnished a 
good market for the jjroducers in this section of 
the state and he made large shipments, so that 
his commercial interests broueht him a good finan- 
cial ineoioe. 

I'nto :\lr. and :Vlr^. Williams 
chil.lren: T.eoia A., the wife 
Booth, a merchant of ShefTield : 
the wife of William W. Dewey. 
Henry: Lila. who resides at home with her 
mother: and Benjamin S., a sirain merchant of 
ShelReli!, who succeeded his father in business. 

On the 10th of .Ansnst, 18r..-, Benjamin F. Wil- 
liam.- wa- made a :ilason in Ames bulge. No. 142. 
of .Slunield. and becam'- one of the most valued 



wer,' burn four 
of lleiirv W. 
ifay Arabella, 
a merchant of 



■\ / 



^^^^/...^ 



PAST A\J) 1'I;KS1:XT of m'UKAL' LULXTV 



673 



menibers of tlie i'ratt.'inity in this coi 
He took a deep interest in" the work of 
and was iii thorougli sympathy with iis [ 
and teachings. In all of his business 
he was found reliable and trustworthy, n 
ing advantage of the necessities of his fc 
in any business transaction. He stood, 
good citizenshiji and for public progre-s 
nuiuity affairs ami his co-operation coul 
be counted upnn for tlie furtherance 
movement that promised to prove of 
Shetlield and Bureau county. In his so( 
tions he also manifested conimendablc 
character, so that hi-^ death wa^ the occ 
wiilc spread and iiiiifdrm regret. 



K-ipie. 
ations 
■r tak- 



WILLIAM 11. ]\1KYK1;. 

William H. ileyer is one of the progressive 
and prominent farmers of Clarion township, own- 
ing a valuable tract of land splendidly ecjuipped 
with all mudeni improvements. His residence 
stands ill tlic midst of a beautiful grove of shade 
tree- v.hieli he planted. There is a natural gas 
well on the jilacc whii h supplies the house with 
heal and light, and with telephone connection 
and free mall delivery there are none of the ad- 
vantages of city life which are lacking, while 
those of a rural existence are likewise enjoj-ed. 

IFr. ]\Ieycr was born in Clarion towusliip, De- 
cember 2, 1S51, his parents being John F. and 
Barbara (Gcutlier) Meyer, both of whom were 
natives of Germanv. The father's birth occur- 
red at Hilla in We.s'tphalia, Germany, October 25, 
IS 19. In the year 1844 he became a resident of 
Charleston, South Carolina, and in 1S47 removed 
to La Moille, Illinois, where he engaged in farm- 
ing. In 1849 he purchased what is now known as 
the old homestead on which his daughter, Jlrs. 
Kroton, with her family, now resides. There were 
four sons and one daughter : William IT. ; John 
C, now in Spring Hill, Whiteside county, Illinois ; 
Henry A., of Eric, Illinois; Herman, a resident 
farmer of Clarion township ; and ilrs. H. Kroton, 
who occupies the old homestead. The father died 
October 2, 1903, while the mother's death occui-red 
June 24, 1866. He had continued actively in farm 
life up to the time of his demise. 

William II. Meyer acquired his educatinn in the 
public schools of his native township and in the 
village school of La ^foille. He was reared to 
the occupation of the farm and has always fol- 
low-ed general agricultural pursuits with the e.M- 
ception of a period of three years spent in a 
store in La Moille, from 1877 until 1880, and 
about three months passed as a clerk in a store 
in Juniata, Nebraska. He afterward engaged 
in farming for three seasons in Nebraska and 
later returned to Clarion townsh.ip. settling on 
section 21, where he yet mak'es his home. He is 
aetivelv engageil in farming ami that his life 



is one of industry and enti'iprisr is indicated 
by the splendid appearauee of his place. He is 
now the owner of one hundred and fortv-one 
acres of fine land in the home farm, in addition 
to which he lias three hundred and eighty-four 
acres in Nebraska and three hundred and twenty 
acres in Texas. He has here a beautiful residence 
which he built himself and the well kept lawn is 
adoi-iied by many fine shade trees that were 
planted with his own hands. All of the build- 
ings upon the place are model and substantial 
structures and there is a tvventy-six pound pres- 
sure gas well which supplies heat and light to 
the house. There is likewise tele^ihone connec- 
tion with tile surrounding towns and a daily mail 
delivery. The mode of living of the farmer" today 
is in marked contrast to thai of fifty years ago, 
when he who lived upon a farm was cut oil" from 
many of the advantages enjoyed by residents of 
the cities. There was also much hard manual 
labor in connection with the development of the 
fields, for nearly all of the work was done by 
hand. The improved machinery has revolution- 
ized all this and every equipment and convenience 
of city life may now be enjoyed by the farmer. 
Mr. Meyer, as a progressive citiz>'n, has secured 
all of these advantages for his family and has 
now one of the model places cf the. county. 

llai)pily mairied Deeemhcr 11, 1884, the year 
of his return to Illinois, ^Ir. iMeyer chose as a 
companion and helpmate for life's journey Jliss 
Z\Iary C. Krooss, who was born in La Moille town- 
ship, June 14, 1SG7, and is a daughter of Henry 
and Sophia (Weigmann) Krooss, both of whom 
were natives of Germany, the former born in 
Ecdcrkesa and the latter in Hanover. The pa- 
ternal grandfather was born in the same country 
Octolier 30, 179-3, and lived to be nearly nini;ty- 
seven years of age, dying on the 19th of July, 
1S92, in La Moille, while making his home with 
his son. He lived with a son in New York city 
from 1SG7 until 1872, but preferring country 
life he came to La I\Ioillc. When a youth of 
seventeen years he served as a soldier of the war 
of 1812 and throughout his entire life his sol- 
dierlv bearing and carriage were manifest in 
marked degree. To the end he renuiiued as erect 
as when he was in military training. Henry 
Krooss, father of ]Mrs. ]\[eyer, came to the United 
States in 1864, landing in New York city, where 
for one year ho engaged in cderking in his brother's 
store. He then came to the middle west and set- 
tled in Bureau county and engaged in farming. 
The following year he was joined by his wife 
and thev lived with their family upon the farm 
for about three years. On the expiration of that 
period they remove<l to Mendota. Illinois, where 
they remained for a year and subsequently they 
took up their abode "in La Moille, where Mr. 
Krooss purchased the brickyard which he owned 
and conduet.'d up to the time of his death, pass- 
ing awav November o, l.<^86. His wife continue.! 



PAST AND PJiJ'SJoXT OF BUKEAU COUxNTY. 



the busiiiL^i until her demise on the 1st of Oc- 
tober, 1901. In their family were two sons and 
two daughters: Mrs. Meyer; Ferdimind C. 
Krooss, now in Triumph, Jliuuosota; 3Irs. Henri- 
etta F. Brown, living at ilaple Park, Illinois; 
and Henry H., who occupies the old home at La 
iloille and is engaged in the conduct of the 
brickyard at one time owned by his father. 

Unto Mr. and ^Irs. I\[eyer have been born four 
daughters; Alma Henrietta, born December 6, 
188 J ; Eda Justina, July 4, 1887; Leola Cath- 
erina, April 14, 1890; and Eeuetta Marie, Novem- 
ber 16, 1891. The family circle yet remains un- 
broken, the daughters being still under the paren- 
tal roof. Mr. Meyer and his family are all mem- 
bers of the German Lutheran church and they 
are 'people of social pi'ominence, occupying an 
enviable position in the community where they 
reside. 

Politically Mr. Meyer is a stalwart republican 
and is entirely satisfied with the administration 
of the party. Ho has held the office of tax as- 
sessor for three years and for fifteen years was 
school director in Clarion township. His offi- 
cial duties ha\e been discharged with promptness 
and fidelity and in all life's relations he is recog- 
nized as a man of genuine personal worth, merit- 
ing the esrecm vs-hieh is so uniformly extended 
him. He represents one of the old and prominent 
families of the county and well deserves mention 
in this volume. 



NATHAX RACKLEY. 

Nathan Eacklev, deceased, was a valued and 
prominent factor in pioneer life in this county, 
and the history would be incompleie without men- 
tion of him. Born in Orange county, Vermont, 
on the 1.5th of December, 1800, he was reared in 
New England, and while still living in the place 
of his nativity was married to iEiss Susan Judd, 
who was also born in Orange county, March 6, 
1801. The wedding was celebrated on the 2Sth of 
January, 1S90, and after living for a number of 
years in the Green ^Mountain state they came to 
Illinois in the spring of 183C. A few Indians 
still lingered in this part of the state, although the 
greater number of the red men had left after the 
Black Ilawk war. Jluch of the land, however, was 
still unclaimed and uncultivated, and was covered 
with its native prairie grasses. Mr. Rackley se- 
cured a tract of land in Berlin township and re- 
mained upon the farm, which he there developed 
and cultivated, until called to his final rest. He 
and his wife were among the earlier pioneers, and 
experienced the hardships incident to the estab- 
lishment of a home on the frontier. There were 
many hardships to be met, difdcultios to be over- 
come and obstacles to be borne. The Indians 
would frequer.tly visit the neighborhood and de- 
mand food of the white settlers. Tin-re were manv 



uild prairie wolves, and on more than one oc^;a- 
sii-n Mrs. Packley, who was renowned as one of 
the bravest women of this part of the country, 
stood with an axe to protect herself from the wild 
animals. It is said that she could light a prairie 
lire witli any man in the county, and it was 
necessary to do so at times, for tlie fires would 
break out in the dry prairie grasses in the late 
fall and hazard the safety of the homes and 
sett]i?rs. In 1837 it became necessary for Mr. 
Paekley to return to New Y^ork to settle up an 
estate which he left there. He was gone so long 
that his wife became alarmed and the supply of 
provisions ran low. Starvation seemed to s'tare 
the family in the face, but Mrs. Paekley with res- 
olute spirit faced the situation and fanned out a 
bushel of wheat by hand, after which she took it 
to the old red mill that then stood on the bank 
of Bureau creek, but is now no more. The miller 
told her that he could not grind her wheat that 
day. That was more than she could stand, and 
the resolute woman broke down in tears. Seeing 
her necessit}-, the miller then ground her wheat 
the next hour, so home she wene with the flour 
that meant so much to the family, for they liad 
had nothing to eat for several days. In those pioneer 
times Phebc Paekley on many an occasion would 
go a mile for coals in order to light the fire. 
I'here were no matches, and if the fire would go 
out they would have to borrow a little fire from a 
neighbor in order to again siart the flame in their 
own fireplace. They used for light at that time 
a piece of rag in a disli of grease. All of the farm 
work was done by hand, and there were many hard- 
.shijis and privations to be borne, but the family 
resolutely set to work to overcome these, and in 
course of time prospered. 

L'nto Mr. and Mrs. Paekley v,-ere born four 
cbildrnn, two sons and two daughters: George, 
Louisa, Nathan F. and Pht-be A. Of these only 
two are now living: Mrs. D. K. Morris and 
George 

■ The father was a prosperous farr.ier, and at the 
time of his death o^^'ned a good tract of land of 
one hundred and twenty acres, which had been 
cultivated and improved through Lis own labor. 
He kept in touch with the spirit of modern prog- 
ress as manifest in agricultural development. In 
his later years, when he became enfeebled, both 
he and his wife went to live in the home of their 
daughter, Mrs. Morris, and from there were laid 
to rest, the latter passing av>-ay on the 14th of 
June, 1892, while the death of Mr. Eackley oc- 
curred on the 25th of April, 1894, when he was 
ninety-four years of age. He was one of the most 
venerable citizens as well as one of the earliest 
settlers of the county, and as such was every- 
where respected and honored. The strong traits 
of his character had won for him the confidence 
and good will of all, and v>-herever he was known 
he was highly esteemed. His politi. al allegience 
was L'ivcn to the republican party. The home ever 




XATilAX liACKLEY. 




:m!;s. xA'riiAN i;a''Ki.kv. 



PAST AX[) r 



?KXT or BLi;i-AU COL-XTV 



al»oiindrd with tiic olJ-tiiae spirit of fruiuior hos- 
}ii{u!ilv-, tun! was esxT open I'or thu reception of 
the luiiiistcrs of difl'ereiit denominations who vis- 
ited tJij county, and who ahva}-^ received a warm 
welcome there. Mr. llackley was not onl}' a wit- 
ness of, but was actively associated with, many 
events whicli have left their impress upon the his- 
tory of the county in its development and up- 
building, and he was especially helpful in reclaim- 
ing the wild laud for the uses of civilization when 
the county was converted from a frontier di.^trict 
into a region of rich fertilitj-, constituting uiie of 
the leading counties of the commonwealth. 



ZOrilER PIIILEMOX HU.AinUIEYS. 

Zopher Philemon Humphreys, deceased, was 
born in St. Joseph, Michigan, October 13, 183 1, 
and came to Sheffield, Illinois, about 18-18 ere the 
town was organized. He was then a young man 
of seventeen years and for about three years he 
engaged in farming. When the railroad was ex- 
tended as far as Sheflield he became a fireman on 
the engine and was thus emjiloyed until about 
1855, when he invested his earnings in a farm of 
eighty acres near Sheffield. He also bought tean-is 
and began the development and improvement of 
that property, which he cultivated until the early 
'60s, when he sold out and bought three hundred 
acres of land in Mineral township. Upon the 
latter farm he continueil to reside until 1801, 
when he disposed of that place and invested in 
three hundred and forty acres in ilineral town- 
ship, whereon he resided until 1005, when he rented 
that place and bought an eighty acre tract ad- 
joining Mineral, ten acres being within the cor- 
poration limits. Here he built a residence and 
made it his home until his death. He was a 
wide-awake and energetic agriculturist, keeping 
in touch with modern methods of farm work, and 
his well tilled fields brought forth generous har- 
vests, his indefatigable energy constituting the 
basis of his success. 

On the 13th of December, ISGl, Mr. Humph- 
reys was married to Miss ^Mary Jlarrilla Case, a 
daughter of Gilbert and Martha ("Wright) Case, 
who came from Ohio to Bureau county in 1850, 
establishing their home in Sheffield. " Tnto lir 
and Mrs. Humphreys wore born the following 
children: A\'illiam Walter, who was born January 

5, 18C3, is a carpenter and farmer living in Mon- 
tana. Charles Edwin, born January 25, 18Gr, 
and now following farming, was married January 

6, 1896, to Jfiss Amelia Gingrich, a daughter of 
Otto Gingrich, a farmer. Dora 'Slav, born August 
1, ISrO, was married October .■]0, ISO:?, to William 
B. Carr, of Shemdd. Effie Emeline, born Janu- 
ary 5, 1873, became the wife of Owen :Meeks, a 
farmer of Sheffield, on tlie 11th of September, 
1S91. Frederick Lee, born June 26, 1878. is en- 
gaged in general agricultiiral pursuits. Hiram 



Eranklin, born January 15, 18Si, is a fanner 
and was mai-ried April 4, 1905, to Ada, daughter 
of John Eiley, of ilineral township, and they 
have one cliild, Wilb,.!-. Opal Blanch, born Oc- 
tober 13, 1887, died on the 15th of February, 
1888. 

The death of the juisband and father occurred 
July 11, 1906, and was the occasion of deep and 
widespread regret among his many friends as well 
as to his iinri-iediate family. He served as school 
director and was also road commissioner and he 
gave not only approbation but heart co-operation 
to many progressive public movements. He stood 
as a leader in agricultural progress and was one 
of the foremost farmers of the county. He 
brought the first traction engine and thresher 
into his township and carried on his business in- 
terests so carefully and ably that he soon ceased 
to be a renter and as the years passed added to his 
holdings until he had a very valuable and well 
improved farm. 'Mr. Humphreys was a self- 
made man and the first forty acres of land which 
he purchased he gave to his father in order to 
prevent him from moving farther west in order 
to get cheap land. He then went to work to 
make a new start and at length jirosperity came to 
him. Ho always abided by the golden rule and 
was highly resjjccted by all who knew him. His 
wife is still living and continues to enjov (jnod 
health. 



C. F. OLSOX. 

It is ever a matter of wonder the progress made 
by foreign-born citizens in America who, coining 
to this country without knowledge of the language, 
customs or habits of the people, readily adajit 
themselves to altered conditions, improve their op- 
portunities and work their way steadily and rap- 
idly upward until they occupy foremost positions 
in the various communities in which they live. To 
this class of citizens belongs C. F. Olson, now 
numbercil among the representative residents of 
Arispie township. Bureau county. 

Born in Sweden in 1847, he is a son of Olaf and 
Christine Ericsou, who were born and died in 
Sweden. The son acquired his education in the 
public schools of his native country, and. realizing 
that the chances for advancement were compara- 
tively few i;i his native land, he resolved to enjoy 
the broader opportunities furnished by the new 
world, and in 1867, when twenty years of age, 
came to the United States, making his way direct 
to Princeton. For two years he was employed as 
a farm hi'iid and afterward occupied a position in 
the plow factory in Princeton for eight years. In 
the meantime he had become owner of a house in 
Princeton, which he traded for forty acres of land 
in Arispie township. He afterward tradeil his 
farm for a tract of eighty acres, which he later 
sold and then bought a one hundred acre farm 
upon wliicli he now resides, in 1806. He has prae- 



I'AST AND I'Ui^sKXT OF i;l];j;al' COr.X'J'V. 



tirally iiiaile all of tlir iiiii,n,vfni.'iUs liriv ami 
ha6 viimpiml hi- [Amv with the hkmIciii arir<- 
sorics and convt'iiicni cs whirli go to farilitate farm 
work and runder rural life ]ili'asant. 

In 1SG9 Mr. Olson cho^c a companion and help- 
mate for life's jouriiey_. being married in that 
year to ^liss Anna Matilda Johnson, who was 
born in Sweden. 'I'hev heraiiie tlie j.arents of 
se\en ehildieii. of « horn Siino,,. the eldest, was 
killed in Kau.as Tity. -Mi-m.iui. uhile engaged on 
the construction of an elevator. The others are 
Oscar, Sclma, Henry, Jennie, flulda and Joseph. 

In his political views Mr. Olson is indejiendont, 
and although he is not neglectful of the duties of 
citizenship he has never sought or desired otliee, 
preferring to aid iti tlio advauceinent of public 
progress as a ])rivate citizen. He belongs to the 
Swedish Baptist church and is interested in all 
that pertains to the material and moral iinprove- 
raent of the community. His r~ a notable ami 
creditable record. He landed in Xew York with- 
out capital or friends, ignorant of the language 
and cu^tiJHis of the people. In his need, however, 
he met a fellow counlrynum who was coming to 
rrinceton and they journeyed together, reaching 
their destination five days after leaving Xew York. 
In tlie early years I\Ir. Olson had a hard struggle, 
but he has conquered and is today one of the sub- 
stantia: 1 representatives of farming intere.-ts in th.e 
county. His industry-, native intelligenee and un- 
faltering honesty have been strong clement.-^ in his 
success and he has worked his way steadily up- 
ward from a humble position to one of allluence, 
and liis fine farm is the visible evidence of his 
life of thrift and industry. He has seen many 
change- in the county during the years of his resi- 
dence here and no native son is more loyal to its 
interests or takes more genuine delight in its 
growth and development than does C. F. Olson. 



MICHAEL F. COFFEY. 

^Michael F. CotTcy, owning an intiTcst in a 
valuable farm of one hundred and seventy-three 
acres, situated in Berlin township. Bureau county, 
was born December 3, 1874, in the county which 
is still his home. Ilis parents are Michael and 
Ellen (Catiipon) Cofiey, both natives of Ireland, 
whence they emigrated to America in early life 
and were married in Illinois. In their family 
were six children, of whom two daughters and 
the subject of this review still survive, while 
three have passed away, and the father is also 
deceased. 

Michael F. Coffey, the only surviving son of 
the father's family, 'was educated in theVunmon 
schools of Bureau county, and on putting aside 
his te.\t-books engaged in farmini:, the oecupatioti 
to which b.c had been reared. !!,■ i.- nud.ing his 
hom^^ with his mother ami sisters on a farm 
of one hundred and seventv-three aere^ of valu- 



able tanning land .-itualed in H, rlin lowu-lin, „, 
whicii estate he ha- an int Te.-t. lle,e he eani.-'o,i 
general agrieultiir.d jmr-uits, lai-iuL' thc' eecaU 
best adapted to soil and elimale. ( )n the place are 
found nuiny modern iinproveiueui.,. and he keep- 
e^e^ytlling in e.vcellent -.Uhlitio,.. ,-,. that tie 
farm is one of the best in I'.eiliu lounship. lie 
di.splays splei„lid ability in the matiai,'emeiit of 
his business atfair,-, .-o that he ii,,t onlv derives 
individual benetit but a!.-o adds to the'finaneial 
resources of his inoth.r and .-isfr-, to whom he 
gives every care and atttution. 

Mr. Coffey gives Ids political supiwrt to the 
democracy, aiid socially is connected with the 
Knights of Colundnis, wliile in religious faith 
he is a communicant of the Itoman Catholic 
church. He has ever been honest and straight- 
forward in his busines.-, dealings, and bv careful 
management of his farming intei'csts has made 
this place one of the best properties of Berlin 
township. He is a noble young man, devoted 
to the comfort and welfare" of his mother and 
sisters, and lie is one of the most respected citi- 
zens in Bureau county, wliere is entire life has 
been passed, and where he has n;iineroii.< friends 
and acquaintances. 



GEOBGE T. NELSON. 

George T. Nelson, deceased, in whose death the 
comnumity lost a representative and valued citizen, 
was a native of England, having been born m 
Manchester, September -27, 1831.^ He was a son 
of James Nelson, who died in that country. In the 
year IS 14 the subject of this review came to 
America with his uncle and in IS-'j.j became a 
re.sident of Illinois, locating on a farm of two 
hundred acres on section 7, Indiantowu township. 
Bureau county, where ho spent his remaining davs 
and where his widow now makes her home, havim^ 
lived here .inee ISG:;. 

-Mr. Nel.-on married :\[i^s Sarah :d. Kohu. who 
was born in Wayne comity, Ohio, a daugiiter 
of Dr. Joseph S. Kohn, a native of Pennsylvania, 
who came with his family to Illinois in 18.31 and 
located in Tiskilwa. He jiracticed his profession 
in Tiskilwa for several years and then removed to 
Stark county, where he spent his remaining days, 
pa-sing away there in 1886. His wife survived 
him for ten years and departed this life in ISOG. 

The marriage of ^Ir. and JErs. Nelson was blessed 
with ten children, five sons and five daughters, 
all of whom are yet living, namely: William J., 
who married Lula Evans and resides in Te.xas; 
Lizzie B.. the wife of W. A. Caldwell, a resident 
of Tennessee; Minnie J., the wife of Willis Mar- 
shall, living in Siou.x City, Iowa ; Frank G., who 
is a traveling salesman from Ciiicagc; Nellie B., 
the uife of Warren Grange, of Wheatland town- 
ship, r.ureau county; Clifton H., at home; Fred 



K 






PAST AND PRESENT OF BUP.EAU COUNTY. 



1.. \vlio iiiaki's liis hniiie in C'lucai^o and is the 
inventor of the secnic aerial trannva}' used in 
parks, etc.; Sarah B., at lionie; Thomas K., wlio is 
now in business Avitli his brother Fred in Chi- 
cago; and Grace ]M., who is the wife of George 
Putnam, chief electrician of the Hotel Pelniont, 
Isew York city. 

Througliout his active business career Mr. Nel- 
son carried on general agricultural pursuits and 
brought his farm under a high state of cultiva- 
tion. He was one of the early residents of Bureau 
county and aided in its substantial improvemenl, 
continuing an active supporter of those measures 
and movements which he deemed of public good 
up to the time of his death. Por many years 
he served as school director and took great interest 
in educational matters pertaining to the public 
schools. He passed a^-ay January 22, 1S96, in 
the faith of the Congregational church of Provi- 
dence, of wliich he was an officer. His wife is 
also a member of that church. He was deeply 
interested in the moral development of his com- 
munity and ever stood for all that is just, true 
and right. jMrs. Nelson is a most pleasant woman 
and has reared a family of wliich she has every 
reason to be proud. Her son, Clifton H., remains 
upon the home farm, which he operate; for his 
mother, and they have a beautiful country prop- 
erty with good buildings and well tilled fields, the 
residence being supplied with all the comforts and 
many of the luxuries of life. 



FRANK C. THACKABEPRY. 

Frank C. Thackaberry is a prominent farmer 
and breeder of thoroughbred Poland China hogs, 
shorthorn cattle and Oxford Down slicep. He re- 
sides on his well equipped and finely improved 
farm on section 9, Fairfield township, and has thus 
been engaged in business here since 1SS5, with the 
exception of three years spent in California. A 
native of Pennsylvania, he was born in Chester 
county in 18o9, and is a son of Israel and Ruth 
Anna (Stanley) Thackaberry, who were natives 
of Pennsylvania, where they spent their entire 
lives. The father was a contractor and builder, 
and for many years was identified with building 
operations in Chester county. He was a son of 
Henry Thackaberry, whose grandfather was a sol- 
dier in the Napoleonic wars and who came to 
America from Ireland. Taking up his abode in 
Pennsylvania, he there followed the occupation of 
farming and reared his family. Unto Israel and 
Ruth Anna Thackaberry were born twelve children, 
of whom the following are living: Milton, Mrs. 
Lizzie Albright, ilrs. Florence Adams, ilrs. IjOU 
Davis and Mrs. Lorena Morris, all of Coatesville, 
Pennsylvania ; Norman G., who is living in Phil- 
adelphia ; Harry C, a resident of Grants Pass, 
Oregon, and J. W., of Princeton. 

The other surviving member of the family is 



Frank C. Thackaberry, of this review, who was 
reared and educated in Pennsylvania, and, after 
completing the common school course, he learned 
and followed tlie milling business for four years. 
He then came to tlie middle west, for a considera- 
tion of the business outlook led him to believe 
that he might have better opportunities in this 
section of the country. For some time after his 
arrival in Bureau county he was engaged in me- 
chanical pursuits, devoting four years to such work 
in this county and in California. For twenty years, 
however, his attention has been largely g'iven to 
general farming and stock-raising, and" he is now 
one of the prominent agriculturists and breeders 
of thoroughbred stock in Fairfield township. His 
home is pleasantly and conveniently located on sec- 
tion 9, and there he tills the soil, bringing forth 
good crops, wliile at the same time he is extensively 
engaged in breeding and raising thoroughbred 
Poland China hogs, shorthorn cattle and O.vford 
Down sheep. At the fair held in this county in 
1906 ho made five entries and carried ofi: five rib- 
bons, all being first premiums on the sheep which 
he exhibited. His flock is headed by an undefeated 
buck that carried all first honors in ilichigan from 
the time that he was placed on exhibition. Mr. 
Thaclraberry also keeps about two hundred liead of 
I'oland China hogs and about fifty head of sheep, 
keeping only the highest grade stock. His farm 
is thoroughly equipped with all modern accessories 
and conveniences, his buildings being specially ar- 
ranged for the care of his fine stock, and through- 
out the county it is regarded as one of the model 
farms. 

Mr. Thackaberry was married in 18S2, before 
going to California, the lady of his choice being 
Miss Alvaretta Thackaberry, a daughter of Marcus 
Thackaberry, who is mentioned elsewhere in this 
volume. She was borji in Fairfield township, and 
by her marriage has become the mother of five 
children, of whom two were born in California. 
Frank is now preparing for the ministry at Eureka 
(Illinois) College, and has been engaged in teach- 
ing, and filled a professorship at Big Rock, Illinois. 
Wayne died in 1803, at the age of eight years. 
[Mamie V. is attending college in De Kalb, Illi- 
nois. Harold, who was born in California, died in 
1893, when sixteen months old. Forrest G., who 
was born in Fairfield township, is at home. The 
family has resided continuously in Fairfield 
township since 1892, and in tlic intervening years 
Mr. Thackaberry has given undivided attention to 
his stock-breeding and raising interests, which he 
has very successfully controlled, being recognized 
now as one of the leading stockmen of this part of 
the state. He has a new residence upon his farm, 
and it is a most splendidly improved place. Ho 
has served in various local offices, and was a candi- 
date of the prohibition party for state b.^ijislatar,-!, 
at which time he made a good run. Socially h'> is 
connected with the Modern Woodnien of America 
and with the Mystic Workers. They are also mem- 



6Si 



PAST AND rj;KSi:\T UF JILKKAL' COf.N'J'V. 



bci-s of the Cluistiaii cliiuuli. Mr. Tliackabern is 
public-spirited and rOLOgnizes the duties and obli- 
gations of citizenship and at the same time finds 
pleasure in aiding in support of the measures and 
movements which he deems of benefit to the 
county. His life is illustrative of the fact that 
prosperity and an honored name may be won 
simultaneously, for while gaining success in an 
active business career he has at tlie same time 
so directed his affairs that lurught is said against 
his integrity and tlic methods which he pursues in 
conducting bis business interests. 



SIDNEY W. SCOTl'. 

Sidney W. Scott, engaged in general farming 
and stock-raising in Xeponset township, \\as born 
in Henry count}', Hlinois, August 29, 1S57. His 
parents were Kobert and Deborah (Dunfee) Scott. 
The father, a native of Jefferson county, Ohio. 
was born January 10, ]S"?5, and is now living in 
Neponset. His parents i\ere John and Nancy 
(Crouch) Scott, the former a native of reunsyl- 
vania and the latter of ^laryland. They died, 
however, in Jefferson county, Ohio. The great- 
grandfather of our subject was James Scott. 

Eobert Scott had but meager educational privi- 
leges, spending only six months in a schoolroom, 
but his desire for knowledge has been satisfied by 
constant reading and he has become a well in- 
formed man. He was reared in his lurtive county 
and at the age of twenty-two years enlisted in the 
American army, serving for six months in the 
Mexican war. He then returned to Ohio and lived 
for five and a half years in Washington county. 
On the .31st of October, 18-52. he married Deborah 
A. Dunfee, who was Iwrn at Torch, Athens county, 
Ohio, !March 21, 183.5, a daughter of Thomas and 
Sarah (Styles) Dunfee. They became residents 
of Illinois in October, 1851, making the journey 
from Ohio by wagon and settling near Kewanee. 
There Jlr. Scott followed farming for about three 
years, after which he removed to Xeponset town- 
ship, where he purchased one hundred and twenty 
acres which he afterward sold and then purchased 
three hundred and sixty acres of land, carrying on 
general farming and stock-raising. He continued 
actively in the businesb until 1880, when he re- 
tired with a handsome competence, gleaned from 
his labors as the years passed by. He has since 
enjoyed a well earned rest at his home in Xepon- 
set, where he is widely and favorably known. His 
political support was given the republican party 
until Grant's second term, since which time he 
has voted with the democracy. His life illustrates 
the fact that success may be achieved by deter- 
mined and unfaltering diligence, for in that way 
Mr. Scott overcame all the difFicuUius ami obsta- 
cles in his path and steadily worked his vay up- 
ward until prosperity rev.ardi.-d him. T!;r family 
numbers tv,o sons and two dau^hfers: Mclvin 0.; 



Sidney W.: l.uura A., the wife of T. X. r.cnncU; 
and Josephine E., tlie v.ife of Edward F. X^jrion. 

Siilncy \V. Scott pursued his education in the 
public schools of Xeponset and was reared to the 
work of the field.s, early becoming familiar with all 
the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the 
agriculturist. At the age of twenty-one years he 
started in life on his own account as a farmer and 
in 18b"? he bought one hundred and twenty acres 
of land. In 1S8S he i)urcha.sed one hundred and 
sixty acres and in 1897 made purcba=e of one hun- 
dred and twenty acres, while on the 2Sth of Aug- 
ust, 190G, he became owner of three hundred and 
twenty acres of land in Manitoba, thirty-nine 
miles from AVinnipeg, Canada. He has always 
carried on general farming and stock-raising and 
has lieen well known as a stock-buyer and feeder of 
cattle, feeding from eighty to one hundred head 
of cattle annually and sometimes as high as one 
hundred and illty head per year. He also feeds 
about three carloads of hogs each year and in 
former years lie engaged in raising sheep, keeping 
at one time from two hundred to two hundred and 
twenty-five head upon his place. His business in- 
terests have been carefully conducted and he has 
beceme known as one of the leading stock-dealers 
of the county. 

On the 23(1 of February, 1882, .Mr. Scott was 
married of !Miss Elizabeth BatdorfT, who was born 
in Xeponset township, January 26, ISGl, a daugh- 
ter of Michael and Sarah (Xortou) Batdorff. Unto 
Mr. and ilrs. Scott have been born the following 
named children : Lucy, born jMarch 6, 1881 ; Eob- 
ert A., June 4, ISSG; Albert E., January 23, 1893 ; 
Xellie M., Seiitemlicr 28, 1891; Blanche, Septem- 
ber 28, 1S9G ; and Velma, August 10, 1893. Tliey 
also lost one child in infancy. 

In politics "SIt. Scott is independent, voting for 
men and measures rather than party, but he has 
little time or opportunity for political work, pre- 
ferring to give his attention to his business inter- 
ests. He is justly regarded as one of the foremost 
farmers and stock-raisers of Xeponset townsliip, 
for his business has now reached extensive propor- 
tions and in its control he shows keen discernment 
and marked enterprise. 



EDWAIin H. MAKKIOTT. 
Edward H. Marriott is proprietor of a meat mar- 
ket in La ^loille, his native village. He was born 
February 28, ISGO, and is of English lineage. He 
was one of two children whose parents were Henry 
and Jane (Perry) Marriott, natives of England", 
who came to the United States in 1857 and settled 
in La Moille township, Bureau county, Illinois. 
Th-^ other eliild of the family died at the age of 
six years. The fatlu'r is living at Kearney, Xe- 
brask'a, but the mother passed awn\- Xovember 
2.5, 1878. 



PAST AND ]' 



;XT oj' i;lj;kal' county. 



esj 



The boyhood daj.s of Eduard 11. :\laniott were 
quietly pasied, iiiunarked by any event of spceial 
importance. The duties of tlic schoolroom and the 
pleasures of the playground occupied his attention, 
his education being aecjuired iu La Moille. After 
leaving school he entered into the meat marlcet 
business and has since continued in this line, being 
now proprietor of a good establisluncnt of this 
character. It is -well equipped iu its various ap- 
pointments for the care aud preservation of meat 
and his shop is at all times neat aud well con- 
ducted, so tliat he has a liberal patrouago. His 
business methods are so strictly honorable and 
straiglit forward that he enjoys the confidence of 
the entire public and his trade is iu consequence 
continually growing. 

On the irtlr of September, lSS-1, llv. Marriott 
was married to Miss Sarah E. Lingel, of Sterling, 
lllinoi.-, ^^•ho was born in renusylvania, June 10, 
1862, and was brought to Illinois when only two 
years of age by her parents, John and Frances 
(Finafrock) Lingel, who were likewise natives of 
the Keystone state, born in Franklin county. In 
their family were six childrcu, of whom ilrs. ilar- 
riott was the youngest. Her girlhood da3s wore 
passed in tliis state and her education was acquired 
iu tlie schools of Sterling. Three cliildren have 
graced this marriage, Pare, Xed and Beth. The 
second son is now iu the state of Washington, 
while the elder son and tlie daughter yet remain 
at home. 

Mr. Marriott iu his fraternal relations is con- 
nected wit'u the Mystic Workers lodge. Xo. 2-?7, at 
La Moillo, and since castiug his first presidential 
ballot for Kutherford B. Hayes, of Ohio, lie has 
been a stalwart republican in his political associa- 
tion. He owns in La iloille an attractive home 
and six acres of land, also a brick business block, 
in which he conducts his market, and other prop- 
erty. He had no special advantages at the outset 
of his career, but he stands today among the lead- 
ing business men of La Moille, having a good pat- 
ronage, while iu his township he is known as a 
man of kindly and genirl disposition, whose defer- 
ence for tlie opinions of otliers and whose genuine 
personal worth have gained him the confidence 
aud goodwill of a large circle of friends and ac- 
quaintances. 



JA^rES S. FULLER. 
James S. Fuller, engaged in general agricul- 
tural pursuits, who iu former years gained more 
thau local reputation as a school teacher and is 
now making a creditable record in farming 'circles, 
resides in Ohio township. His birth occurred in 
Geneseo, Illinois, on the 2rth of January, 18G1, 
his parents being Charles and Catharine (Drady) 
Fuller. The fatlier was born in Ithica, Xew York, 
and came to Illinois in 1820 when all the northern 
Fcctiori of this state was- an almost uninhabited 



district, giving little prumise of Us present devel- 
opiucut and progress. He married ifiss Brady, a 
native of Pennsylvania, and of their family" of 
nine children James S. was the sixth iu order of 
birth. 

Xo event of sjiecial iuqiorluuce occurred to vary 
the routine of farm life for James S. Fuller iu his 
early boyhood days. He pursued his preliminary 
education in the public schools of Henry county 
aud afterward enjoyed the advantage of instruc- 
tion iu the Xorthwestei-n Xormal school at Gene- 
seo, Illinois. When his studeut life was ended he 
became a teacher and for ten years followed that 
profession with excellent success, proving an able 
representati\e of the system of public instruction 
in this part of the state. He was an excellent dis- 
ciplinarian and, moreover, jiad the ability to im- 
part clearly and concisely to others the knowledge 
that ho had acquired, itis entire attention is now 
given to general agricultural pursuits aud he ov.ns 
eighty acres of laud which was the old homestead 
property of Mrs. Fuller. The farm is now well 
improved, the fields being richly cultivated and 
divided into tracts of convenient size by well kept 
fences. The buildings arc in good repair and 
everything about tlie place is indicative of the 
careful supervision and practical methods of the 
owner. 

On the 3d of April, ]S89, James S. Fuller was 
married to i\[is3 Ella Haines, who was born in 
Bureau county, July -1, ISGS. She, too, completed 
her education in Xorthwcsiern Xormal at Gene- 
seo, Illinois. Her parents were A. J. auil Julia 
(Williams) Haines, natives of ^Mainc and of reiin- 
sylvania respectively. They became early pioneer 
residents of Bureau county, settling here in 1335, 
at which time they cast in tlieir lot with the citi- 
zens of Ohio township. Both, however, are now de- 
ceased. In tlieir family were four children, of 
whom ilrs. Haines is the third in order of birth. 
The marriage of our subject and his v.iie has been 
blessed witlTa son aud daughter: Albert A., born 
ilav U, lS9i; and Mildred G., born Maivh 30, 
1900. 

Kcgarding it the duty as well as the privilege of 
every American citizen to support the political 
principles wliicli he believes are most conducive 
to general good and the best government, he gives 
a loyal support to the republican party. Frater- 
nally he is connected with lodge Xo. 61, Knights 
of tiie Globe, and he and his family are members 
of the ifethodist church, in the work of which 
he is interested, while to its support he contributes 
liberally. The family are now comfortably sit- 
uated in life and 5Ir. Fuller is deserving of credit 
for what he has accomplished in the business 
world. He had little assistance when he started 
out on his own account, but he realized that the 
e.~.sential qualities of success are close applicaliou, 
unfaltering perseverance and trii>tw()rtliiness, aud 
upon that foundation he has builded the super- 
structure of his present prosperity. He is an ad- 



6S(j 



PAS'j' AXJ) rj;i:si:.\'j- 



]^l'j;i;al: coiwjy 



vocate, too, of education aiiJ of all tliu=e things 
which {jroiiiotc esthetic, intellectual and niordl cul- 
ture am] liis influence ii ever ou the side of the 
ri;:ht, the true and the beautiful. 



LE KOY HUDSUX i;i:ED. 

Le Roy Hudson IJeed, \\hosc name is now on the 
roll of Bureau county's honored dead, was born 
in Perry county, Ohio, July 13, 1841, and be- 
longed to that class of citizens who are true and 
loyal to public interests and who in private life 
manifest many sterling traits of character. His 
father, the Rev. John Eeed, was a native of ;Massa- 
chusetts and a minister of the Methodist Episco- 
pal ckurch. With his family he removed to GranI 
county, Wisconsin, in lSo4, and there lived for 
ten years, coming thence to Bureau county, Illi- 
nois, in lS6-i, where he spent his remaining days. 
His political views were in accord with repub- 
lican principles. 

Le Eoy Hudson Reed was educated in the com- 
mon schools and was reared amid the refining in- 
fluences of a good Christian home, so that the 
seeds of honorable manhood were early planted 
in his mind through the training and teaching 
which he received under the parental roof. On 
the 7tli of August, 1806, he w-edded Miss Sarah 
F. Britton, who was born in ]Mason county, Illi- 
nois, May 20, 184C. She was one of the eleven 
children of Deacon Andrew and Eunice (Benja- 
min) Britton. Her mother was from Allegany 
county, New York, and her father came to Bureau 
county from Mason county, Illinois, in 1850, ac- 
companied by his family. He lived upon his farm 
until 1872, when he retired from active business 
life and took up his abode in Bradford. Both he 
and his wife have now passed away. Unto Mr. 
and ilrs. Reed were born eight children, six 
daughters and two sons, all of whom are yet liv- 
ing. Adda E. married John M. Christman, a 
farmer and stockman living in Xevada, Iowa, and 
has one daughter. Stella is the wife of Baxter 
Sharp, a dentist of Mendota, Illinois, and has 
three sons. Cora Etta is the wife of George Smith, 
a farmer of Marshall county, Illinois, and they 
have one son and one daughter. Sarah Grace, 
DorlesquG J., M. Viola and Frank B. are all at 
home; and Clark L., the youngest of the family, 
is attending college at Ames, Iowa. There is also 
an adopted son, Christopher King, who studied 
law in Chicago and has now practiced his profes- 
sion for seven or eight years with offices in the 
New York liife Building in Chicago. Before tak- 
ing up the profession of the law he taught school 
for several years and he is a young man of strong 
intellectual force and ability. He married Lottie 
Hutton. of Chicago, Septenlber 15, 1906. 

During an active life Le Roy H. Reed became 
till' owner of the land upon which his father first 
settled on coming to Bureau county and always 



lived upon the ohl homo place. He had altogether 
three hundred and twenty acres in Milo township, 
where his widow now resides, and he improved the 
farm, making it a nice property equipped with all 
modern conveniences and accessories. It is located 
on section 31 and about three miles east of Brad- 
ford. The farm work is now conducted by their 
sou Frank, who is extensively engaged in the rais- 
ing and feeding of cattle, horses and hogs and 
also buys and sells stock. 

Politically ]\rr. J?eed was an earnest republican, 
believing llrndy in the principles of the party. He 
served as school director and road commissioner 
and was an active member of the ^Methodist Epis- 
copal church at Bradford, of which he served as 
trustee for many yeaj-s. He was deeply interested 
in the material, intellectual and moral progress of 
his community and he stood for all that is right 
and ju.5t in man's relations with his fellowmen 
and for all that tends to ameliorate the hard condi- 
tions of life for the more unfortunate ones of the 
world. His good qualities were so many and his 
friendships so sincere that he was well liked by all 
and his death, which occurred April 29, 190C, was 
the occasion of deep and widespread regret. His 
widow ;till resides upon the old homestead and h.is 
many friends in the community. 



THO:\IAS EARL VAUGHX. 

Thomas Earl Vaughn, deceased, was a man 
whom to know was to respect and honor, and in 
Bureau to^rnship, where he had very wide ac- 
quaintance, his memory is cherished by man} 
friends. He was born at Xew Bedford, Massa'- 
chusetts, in July, 1832, a son of Stillman and 
Lucinda (Washburn) Vaughn, both of whom were 
natives of the old Bay state. On leaving Ntsv 
England they located in ZanesviUe, Ohio, and re- 
moved thence to Bureau county, Illinois, where 
they arrived when their son, Thomas E., was a 
young man of ein^htecn years. This was about 
1850 and through almost a half ceutui'y he re- 
mained a resident of the county, identified with 
its agricultural interests. 

On the 9th of Xovembcr, 1855, Jlr. Vaughn was 
united in marriage to Miss Lydia J. Ilollings- 
hcad, a daughter of Thomas and Sarah lloUings- 
head. Her father's death occurred in this coun- 
ty and her mother passed away in the spring of 
1891. The marriage of IMr. and !Mrs. Vaughn 
was blessed with a family of twelve children: 
Lewis, John A., Xatban F., Julia A., Lillian M., 
Thomas C, Enuna L, Fannie E., Maggie S., Earl 
S., Verna V. and Xcllie L. The daughters Lil- 
lian and ^faggie, are now deceased. 

As the years passed by ilr. Vaughn became the 
owner of a valuable farm property comprising 
one hundred and si.vty acres of land, in addition 
to which he owned fifty acres of timber land. 
This, however, did not C'-.mprise the extent of his 




TiKJ^iAS E. ^■AUG^^^ 



PAS'j' AXJ) ]'i;kse.\t or buj;eau couxtt. 



G89 



acreage,' for as liis fiuaiicial resiiureei iueieasoJ lie 
made judicious iiivestineiits in iiropcrty and dur- 
ing liis life time owned five liundred and tliirty 
acres, beiiig one of the large landholders of this 
part of the county. lie also engaged in mer- 
chandising in the Town of \\'yanet for a number 
of years, dealing in hardware and clothing and 
afterward in groceries. lie secured a libci-al 
patronage in his'store, owing to his earnest elTorts 
to please his customers, his reasonable prices and 
his straightforward dealings. He was a man of 
good business capacity and of executive force and 
his labors resulted in the acquirement of a very 
handsome competence. He was always interested 
in matter.^ relating to the general welfare ami 
though he never sought or desired public office 
he kept well informed on issues of the day and 
generally gave his support to the republican party. 
He did not con.-ider himself bound by party ties, 
however, and frequently cast an independent bal- 
lot. His religious faith was indicated by his 
membership in the IMcthodist church and was, 
moreover, evidenced by his daily life, his con- 
sideration for the riglits of others and his hon- 
esty and integrity under all conditions. He passed 
away February 9, 1890 in his sixty-si.Nth year 
and the community thereby lost one of its valued 
citizens, his neighbors a fflithful friend and his 
family a devoted husband and father. 

Mrs. Vaughn is also a devoted and zealous mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church. She still 
lives upon the old homestead and her son Lewis 
and dauHiter Emma J. are still livimr with her. 



DAinrS MTLEEPv. 
Darius ^Hller, lirst vice-president of the Chi- 
cago, Burlington & Quincy railway, with office in 
Chicago, was born in Princeton, Illinois, April 3, 
1859. Almost his entire life has been devoted to 
railroad service, in which he has made steady prog- 
ress, his ability gaining recognition in promotion 
which has made him consecutively stenographer 
in the general freight office of the ^Michigan Cen- 
tral railroad from Xovember, 1877, until June, 
ISSO; clerk in the general freight office of the St. 
Louis, Iron ilountain & Southern railway from 
June, 1830, until February, ISSl; chief clerk to 
the general manager of the ]\femphi3 ..l- Little 
Eock Itailroad from February, 18S1, until October, 
1883; general freight and ticket agent of the same 
road from October 8, 1883, until June 1, 1887; 
general freight and passenger agent of the St. 
Louis, Arkansas & Texas railroad from June, 
1SS7, until July, 1SS9; trafTic manager of the 
same road from July 1, 1889, until December 15, 
1890; traffic manager of the Queen & Crescent 
route from December 15, 1890, until ]^Iay 20, 
1893; traffic manager of the ^[is'^ouri, Kansas & 
Te-tas railway from May 20, 1893, to September 
1, 189G ; vice president of the same road from Sep- 



tember 1, is'.KJ, until Xovember 15, 1898; second 
vice presi.leiit of th.j Cr.Mt Northern railway from 
November l.j, 1898, t<j Deeeml^cr 3J, 19i>j ; and 
on the 1st of January, 1902, he became first vice 
jjresidi'ut of the Chicago, Burlinglon & Quincy 
railway. His rise has thus been rapid to a posi- 
tion of proniiiii'iuc, m.iking him one of tlie well 
known factors in railmad ciivles in the counlrv. 



JONA'J'HAN N. PETTIGPEW. 

Jonathan N. Petligrew- is a retired farmer liv- 
ing on section IG, Milo township. He lias fol- 
lowed the natural course of events in a bu.-y life, 
for nature seims to have intended that man should 
enjoy a period of rest in his later years. In youth 
he is full of energy and hope and these later are 
tempered by sound judgment and business experi- 
ence and when industry is well applied and when 
perseverance is unceasing he eventually earns a 
competence which in the evening of life permits 
him to enjoy a well earned rest. Such has been 
the record of Mr. Pcttigrcw, a most respected citi- 
zen of ililo township. He was born in iJearborn 
county, Indiana, December 10, 1831, a son of 
Nathan Pettigrew, who spent his later years in 
this county and here passed away. In the family 
were nine children, of whom there were seven sons, 
Jonathan N. l)eing the youngest. Ho now has 
one sister living, Mary Frances, of Martinsville, 
Indiana. 

Mr. Pettigrew of this review was edueated in 
the connaon schools of his native stale and also 
attended school for two winters after arriving in 
Illinois. He came to Bureau county in 18 tO when 
a youth of sixteen years, arriving here with only 
fifteen cents in his pocket. His financial condition 
rendered immediate employment a necessity. He 
had driven across the country with one horse, an 
old buggy and a saddle hor.so, and after reaching 
his destination he worked at anything that he 
could get to do that would yield him an honest 
living. Thus he made his start, carefully saving 
his earnings uittil in 1851 he had a sum sufficient 
to enable him to purchase three eighty-acre tracts 
of land, for which he paid three hundred dollars. 
He has since lived upon the farm which at that 
time came into his possession. He now owns 
eighty acres where he resides, together with fif- 
teen acres of timber land, and has a well developed 
farm property, his home being pleasantly and con- 
veniently situated about five miles from Bradford. 
He has seen the country grow from a rough prairie 
into one of the rich agricultural counties of the 
state and has done much toward making it what 
it is today. 

Mr. Pettigrew was married to Miss Di.uia E. 
Blaisdell, of Peoria county, Illinois, who was born 
in Mercer county, this state. They had four chil- 
dren : Jay, who married ilrs. Towilliger, by whom 
he lias a' son and a daughter, and lives in P.rad- 



(i90 



rvsT AX]) rJ!i;si:\'i' of bi"i;j:au county. 



ford, llliuoij; Lou, who died m HHJl, leaving a 
wife and two children; Laura, the wife of Asa 
Lake of Stark county, Illinois; and Benjamin, 
who married a Miss Webster and lives upon his 
father's farm. He has one child. 

Politically Mr. Pettigrew is a rejiubliean but 
has never had aspiration for ollae nor has he ever 
identified himself with fraternal organizations. Ho 
and his wife are yet very active and he is a self- 
made man, deserving much credit for what he has 
accomplislied. He has been both the architect and 
builder of his own fortunes and the result of his 
labors has been gratifying. 



OLT\'Er.: WELLS :\rcKE.\ZTK. 

Oliver Wells ^McKenzie, who died on the i^^d of 
•July, 1S92, was a citizen of sterling worth who 
for many years had resided upon his farjn just 
south of Yorktown in Fairfield township and 
who was honored and respected throughout the 
community and wherever he was kno^vn. Coming 
to this country at an early day, he demonstrated 
in his life record that success and an honorable 
name may be won simultaneously, for he started 
out in life empty handed and worked his way 
steadily upward until he was numbered among 
the prosperous residents of the county. Moreover, 
he was closely associated with many early events 
which have left their impress upon the develop- 
ment and upbuilding of the community. 

A native of iSTew York, ]\Ir. McKenzie was born 
in Port Henry, March S, 18"3.3, his parents being 
John and Betsy (Havens) McKenzie, who were 
likewise natives of that place. They came to the 
west accompanied by their family of nine chil- 
dren, including Hiram, Eliza, John, Oliver W., 
He Lafayette, Jjyman, Louisa, Eobert and Chaun- 
cey. Of these Lyman, Robert and Chauncey are 
still living and the last two are residents of this 
county, while L_vman makes his home in Wood- 
ruff, Kansas. The father purchased a farm near 
Yorktown in Fairfield township, constituting a 
part of the property now owned by his son P.ob- 
ert. He devoted his remaining days to the ardu- 
ous task of developing and improving a new farm 
on the frontier and here passed away July 3, 
1857, at the age of si.vty-three years, while his 
wife died on the 5th of March, 185 K at the age 
of fifty-eight years. 

Oliver W. ^McKenzie, whose name introduces 
this record, accompanied the family on their re- 
moval westward to Bureau county in the spring 
of 184t). His education had been acfjuircil in the 
schools of his native state and there he had 
learned the blacksmith's trade, which he followed 
prior to his marriage. He was the first blacksmith 
and storekeeper in Y^orktown and thus he became 
closely associated with the early growth and im- 
provement of the community and with the work 
of establishing its industrial and commercial 



status. Following his marriage he turned his at- 
tention to farming, settling ou sectiou 7, Fairfield 
township. He was a prosperous agriculturist and 
in addition to the tilling of tlic soil he was ex- 
tensively engaged in raising cattle, horses and 
hogs. Whatever he undertook he carried forward 
to completion and his unfaltering perseverance 
and his diligence, which enabled him to overcome 
all the difliculties and obstacles in his path, at 
lengtli gained him a place among the prosperous 
men of the county. He added to his original 
holdings until at one time he owned nearly seven 
hundred acres of land, of which one hundred and 
si.xty acres was in Whiteside county, while the 
remainder was in Bureau county. He continued 
actively in business until about sixteen months 
prior to his demise and therefore his was a most 
useful, active life, while his business integrity 
also stood as one of the salient features in his 
career. 

Mr. McKenzie was married in Priucetnn to 
Miss Emily Dow on the 20th of Marcli, 1S50. 
She was a sister of Benjamin F. Dow, who is 
mentioned elsewhere in this work, and for thirty- 
eight years she proved a faithful companion and 
helpmate to her husband on life's journey, at the 
end of which time she was called to her final 
rest on the 5th of Xovcmber, ISSS, when fifty- 
eight years of age. t'nto Jlr. and Jtrs. McKen- 
zie were born si.x children, Eliza PI., the eldest, 
born February 3, 1S51, was married on the 13th 
of February, 18G8, to William M. Brooks, who 
was born August 27, 1846, near Cato, New Y'ork, 
and ill 1859, when a youth of thirteen, accom- 
panied his parents on their removal to Gales- 
burg, Hlinois. The family, however, was soon 
afterward established in Fairfield township. Bu- 
reau county, where the parents made their home 
until death. William ]VL Brooks was a son of 
Earl S. and IMargaret (Jewell) Brooks, the former 
passing away February 27, 18S3, at the age of 
seventy-si.\- years, while the latter died on the 
21st of April, 1901, at the advanced age of eighty- 
four. Mr. and Mrs. William M. Brooks now have 
three children. Clinton A.., who was born JIarch 
12, 1S72, and is now residing near Center Chapel 
in Fairfield tow;iship. was married ilarch 25, 
1891, to ]\riss Nettie Bunker and has three chil- 
dren: Eva Doll, born September 6, 1895; De 
Wayne, born February 5, 1901; and Clara Y\'., 
who was born February 12, If'O-i. Glenn E. 
Brooks, born February IG, ISSI, and now engaged 
in farming in Fairfield township, married Miss 
Lena Eowc on the 19th of March, 1902, and has 
one son, Gordon. Blanche ^L Brooks, born June 
23, 1SS3, became the wife of Le Hoy Darnell 
on the 27th of August, 1903. They reside just 
south of YorktowT. and they have (wo children: 
Evelvn ami Kenneth. Julius Adelbert ^[cKcnzie, 
born" July 11. 1S53, died September 22, ISoG. 
Raymond" H., b.>rn Xovembcr 30, 1854, and nov.- 
living retired at Tampico, was married to Lovina 



\ / 



\ / 



(P'i/\^/^M"^'^ 



PAST AXI) l'];i:SK.\'T OF BUREAU CoUNTV 



We.4 and [hey have tliroe chiMnjii : Le Roy, 
Fern and Clyde- William E., bom October 20, 
1S56, died November 25, 1858. Oliver Wilson, 
born July 5, 1850, died July 3, 1SG3 ; and one 
child, born Septenibor 27, ISGl, died when only 
three weeks old. 

Oliver W. McTCenzie was always a stalv.art dem- 
ocrat in his political faith but frequently cast an 
independent ballot at local elections. He was 
the first constable and also the first assessor in 
Fairfield township and was closely identified with 
public progress whether in office or out of it. He 
lived in the county in early days when its homes 
were largely pioneer cabins and when much of its 
land was uncleared and uncultivated. His mem- 
ory compassed the time when the houses were 
heated with fireplaces and lighted by candles and 
when the farm work w-as done with very crude 
machinery as compared to the improved agricul- 
tural implements of this day. However, he kept 
in touch with the trend of modern progress and 
at all times he stood for every interest that tended 
to benefit the county along material, intellecturd 
and moral lines. He was always straightfor\rard 
in his business transactions, considerate of his 
friends, kindly in manner and of unquestioned 
integrity of purpose, and thus he left behind 
him a record which is indeed worthy of emulation. 



GEOEGE WASHIXGTOX HEWITT. 

George Washington Ib.'v.itt is proprii'tor of the 
Hickory Grove farm, situated just at the corpora- 
tion limits of the village of Maulius. It comprises 
one hundred and eighty acres of land which is 
well improved and in the further development 
and cultivation of this place ]\Ir. Hewitt spends 
his time and energies with the result that his 
labors are attended with good success. He was 
born in Orange, Ohio, October 9, 18-10, a son of 
William and Eoxena (^[etealf) Hewitt, who were 
originally from Massachusetts. The father was 
a farmer by occupation and, emigrating westward 
in 18-19, he passed through Burea\i county. Later 
he returned to Cleveland, Ohio, but in 1852 he 
made a permanent settlement in this county. Here 
he engaged in farming up to the time of his death, 
which occurred in 1903. He had for a numlicr (if 
years survived his wife. 

George W. Hewitt was educated in the common 
schools of Bureau county and farmed with his 
father until after the outbreak of the Civil war, 
when he enlisted in defense of the Union, becoming 
a member of the Si.xty-fourth Illinois Volunt-'cr 
Infantry in 1SC2. The regiment was mustered in 
at Springfield, and he participated in the battles 
of Franklin, Lookout Mountain, Dalton, Eesaca, 
Ack-vvorth, Xew Hopi' Church, Kenesaw ilnun- 
tain and Marietta. He was also in the siege of 
Atlanta and in the battle of Peach 'Tree Creek. 
Subsequent to the capitulation of .Vtlantu the 



regiment to which Mr. Hewitt belonged man-bed 
to Jonesboro and on to Savannali, then through 
South Carolina to Goldsboro, Xortli Carolina, and 
to Ealeigh. Later they proceeded to Washington, 
D. C, where he participated in the grand review 
on the 23d of May, 18Go, this being the most cele- 
brated military pageant ever seen on the western 
hcmisplicre. The regiment was mustered out at 
Louisville, Kentucky, in June, ISuo, and with 
a creditable military record Mr. Hewitt returned 
home. 

He resuTuod farming in Bureau county and 
was thus engaged up to the time of his marriage, 
which was celebrated on the 17th of February, 
18G6, j\riss Mary JIartin, a daughter of James and 
Permelia Martin, becoming his wife. They have 
lost two children and have si.K living children: 
Xora, the wife of William Caskey, a resident 
farmer of ^Maidius township; Eva M., the wife of 
Fred A. Plumley, who follows farming in Jfan- 
lius township ; Elsa P., the wife of Fi-anklin Dab- 
ler, an agriculturist of the same township; Allen 
D., who follows farming; Frank S., who married 
Gertrude Pluralev, a farmer of Manlius township, 
and Stacy H., who is on the home farm and is 
attending school at Princeton. 

The family have an attractive and pleasant 
home, for the Hickory Grove farm is conven- 
iently situated on the eastern edge of the town of 
Manlius. The fields are highly cultivated and 
nearly the entire tract of one hundred and eighty 
acres is devoted to the cultivation of grain. 
Everything about the place is neat and thrifty in 
appearance and indicates the careful supervision 
of the owner. I'or thirty years ilr. Hewitt has 
been a school director and fraternally he is con- 
nected with the Grand Army of the Eepublic, 
while politically he is a republican. The family 
attend the Wesleyan ^lethndist church and are 
widely and favorably krinv\n in the community 
where thev reside. 



J. P. BUTLEi;, ^1. D. 

Dr. J. P. Butler, who in addition to faithfully 
I'eri'orniing the duties connected with a large 
and growing medical and surgical practice is 
serving for the second term as mayor of Ladd, 
belongs to that class of representative men whose 
business interests, though extensive and important, 
do not exclude active participation in those inter- 
ests afi'ecting the general welfare or in those 
movements which promote public progress, and as 
mayor of Ladd Dr. Butler is giving tangible evi- 
dence of his devotion to the public good. 

A native of Xew York, Dr. Butler was born in 
Onondaga county September 10, 1854. and is of 
Irish lineage. His father, Patrick Butler, was 
a native of Ireland, and when twenty-five years 
of age came to the United States, seltliug in the 
Emnire state. Ho married Catherine Bannon, also 



G94 



PAST AM) l'J;i:SE.\T OF iiUIiEAU COUM'Y. 



a iiativu of the Kuioralil islo, and they rwireJ 
tliuir family iu New York. 

Dr. Butler acquired hi.s more speeifirally liter- 
ary education in the public scliools of Cliitteuaii- 
go, iSew York, aud on putting aside his tc.vt-books 
engaged iu farm ^vork, and in other labor of va- 
rious kinds, until 1SS3, when, ambitious to direct 
his energies into other channels demanding greater 
mentality, he took up the study of medicine and 
was giad'uatcd from llahueniann ^fedieal College, 
of Chicago, in the class of ISHO. After one year 
spent in practice in Michigan he came to Illinois 
and entered upon the active work' of the profession 
in Ladd, where lie has since remained. He is 
careful and accurate in the diagnosis of a case aud 
seldom, if ever, at error in the administration of 
remedial agencies, and he keeps in touch with the 
mosl advanced thought of the profession through 
reading and investigation, so that he is continually 
broadening his knowledge and pron^otiiig his elTi- 
cency. 

In pubic affairs Dr. Butler has manifested a 
most coinmendaljlc and public-spirited interest, 
aud his re-election to the office of mayor is indica- 
tive of faithful, prompt and capable service dur- 
ing his first term. Fraternally he is connected 
with the Modern Woodmen, Knights of Pythias 
and Foresters. Hapjiy in his home life, he was 
married in 1S93, to !Miss Catherine Lehman, a na- 
tive of Putnam county, Illinois, and they now have 
two daughters: ]\Iildred, born in October, 1S91, 
and Florence, in November, 1895. 

Dr. Butler, without special advantages in his 
youth, has gained a position of prominence in 
the community where he makes his home and in 
the profession to wliich he devotes his energies, 
and the innate strength of his character, his laud- 
able ambition and strong determination arc the 
concomitants which have led to this result. He 
has a wide acquaintance and his frienils are 
manv. 



COLOXKL JOHN DUXXK. 
Colonel John lUinno, engaged in geufral fann- 
ing and stock-raising, is also well known in other 
business connections, especially as an auctioneer 
and as general manager of the Empire Telephone 
Company, of which he is likewise one of the di- 
rectors. He is a native of Kings county, Ire- 
land, although in his infancy he was brought to 
the new world. His birth ocurred May 10, 1S57, 
his parents being ilichacl and Julia (Ryan) 
Dunne, both of whom were natives of the Emerald 
isle, the former born in Kings county and the 
latter in West ^^cath. It was in the year ISoS 
that Jlichael Dunne crossed the Atlantic in a 
sailing vessel, which was six weeks and two days 
in making the voyage from Dublin to Quebec. He 
remained in Canada for a sliort time and then 
removed to Pierpont, a town situated on the Erie 
canal in New Y'ork. Tliere he was emplovod fi>r 



some time, after which ho made his way to lUif- 
falo by canal and on to Cliicago by )-ail and 
thence to Peoria by the Illinois and }i[ichigan 
canal and the llinois river. When they were 
upon the Illinois river his son, ?^Iathew, then a 
youth of sixteen 3X'ars, fell overboard and was 
drowned. Mr. Dtiuue worked for the Peoria & 
Oquawka Eailroacl, being with the company for 
about one year, after which he v.as employed by 
the Bureau Valley Iiailroad, wliich is today a 
part of the Chicago & Eock Island Piailroad sys- 
tem. When that Ihie was graded he began work- 
ing for Peter W. Dunne as foreman of track-lay- 
ing, anil subsequently he was employed at Oak 
Hill and at Edwards Station by that company. 
In 1S-5S, withdrawing from the railroad service, he 
turned his attention to farming near Edwards 
Station, in Peoria county, Illinois, where he re- 
mained -until 186?, when he came to Macon 
township, Bureau eounty, and purchased a farm 
upon which he resicHed until his death on the 8th 
of August, 1890, when he was eighty years of 
age. His wife also passed away in Macon town- 
ship, her death occurring November 21, 1890, 
when she was seventy-five years of age. He and his 
family were comniuniicants of the Eoman Catholic 
church, and in politics he was a Jackson demo- 
crat, who strongly a'lvocatcd the war, and was a 
stalwart champion of the Union cause. Hnto 
him and his wife were born six children, of whom 
two died in infancy in Ireland, while four came 
with them to this country. Three of the number 
are now living. James, the eldest, was a volun- 
teer of Company 0,. One Hundred and Eighth 
Illinois Tolunteer Iniantry, and served for three 
years and four nionihs. He is now living in 
Quincy, in the SoldiuJa' Home, but for a number 
of years was a farmer of Macon township and sold 
his property to his brother John. Joseph, who 
was a member of the Eleventh Illinois Cavalry for 
nearly four years, is also living at tiic Soldiers' 
Home in Quincy. 

Colonel Dunne wa.s brought to the United States 
by his parents during his infancy and acquired 
a public school education. When twenty-two 
years of age he began farming on his own ac- 
count in Macon to^raship and is today carrying 
on general agricultural pursuits and s:"ck-raising, 
having a few full-blooded Hereford cattle, known 
as the Daniel Webster stock. He is l:kewise gen- 
eral manager of the Empire Telc])hone Company, 
extending over ilacon, Neponset, Concord, Wya- 
net, Milo and Wheatland townships, and also to 
Saratoga, [Marshall county; Penn, Osalon and El- 
mira, Stark county. The company owns all of 
the aliove lines and aJso has connc'.ting lines 
whereby they can do business with Chicago and 
in fact have unlimited long distance service. At 
the pre^eut time Mr. Dunne, as genera! manager, 
is rebuihling the X'eponset exchange. Trie ofUcers 
of this company are Cj'rus Boeock. president; 
James A. Briggs, vice-president; John H. Draw- 



PAST AND ri;i:s]:NT of bujieau couxtv 



G'J5 



yor, secivtary; Sidney \V. Scott, trcusuriT, ;iud 
John J)unnu, general njanager; and in connection 
with the otlicers, George A. Carpc"- and John Mc- 
Chnne are serving ou the board of directors. ^Ir. 
Dunne is also a stoekhoKlor in tiie Bradford Driv- 
ing Park Association, of which he was formerly 
a director, and ho has done railroad and other 
contracting and for a number of years has been 
well known as a leading auctioneer of this part of 
the state, crying many sales, in which connection 
he is popiilar as well as efllcient. 

On the 9th of December, 1S7-1, Colonel Dunne 
was married to Miss ilary O'Connor, at Cham- 
paigii, Illinois. She was born in Greenfield, 
Massachusetts, July 7, lS-34, and is a daughter of 
Patrick and- Katherine (Kane) O'Connor. Her 
father died in Champaign county, Illinois, Decem- 
ber 30, 1S9-?, at the ago of seventy-two years, 
while his wife passed away March 31, ISOl, at 
the age of si.vty-five years. He was born in Ire- 
land and came to this country iu IS-IS on a sail- 
ing vessel, wiiich was si.\ weeks in completing the 
voyage between Limerick and Quebec. He pro- 
ceeded thence to Greenfield, Massachusetts, where 
he followed farming for four years and then re- 
moved to Virginia, where he lived for about a 
year. On the expiration of that period he came 
to Illinois, settling at Brinificld, where he car- 
ried on farming on a tract of land of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres. He spent his last five 
years as a retired farmer on the old homestead, 
leaving the active work of the fields to others, 
while he enjoyed a period of well earned rest. 
His political allegiance was given the democracy 
as advocated by Jackson and he held raembershij) 
in the Eoman Catholic church. He and his wife 
were married at Limerick, Ireland, ^[ay 3, 1S4S, 
and unto them were born seven children, three 
sons and four daughters, of whom three are now 
living, namely: ^Irs. Dunne; Patrick, who re- 
sides in Champaign county, Illinois, and Johanna, 
the wife of ^liehael Hurley, a resident of Chicago. 

Unto Colonel and ilrs. Dunne have been born 
eight children, seven of whom survive: Kather- 
ine J., who was born Decendier IG, 1875, and is 
the wife of Joseph P. O'Brien, a resident of St. 
Joseph, Missouri; Ida G., born May 31, 1S77; 
Jcsephine, who was born ^Mav 1, 1S79, and died in 
infancv; Marv A., born iMarch 31, 1881; Alice J., 
May 21, 188.3; Michael J., April 14, 1SS.5; Anna 
C, who was bora February 27, 1838, and is a 
school teacher in lier home district; and Nellie T., 
who was born March 15, 1891. 

The family are communicants of the Eoman 
Catholic church. Mr. Dunne casts an independent 
ballot, and does not seek nor desire political pre- 
ferment. He is well and popularly known through- 
out the county as Colonel r)unnc and is a man of 
genial disposition, cordial manner and undoubted 
sincerity. He is nov.- closely associated with varied 
business interests and his labors are largelv of a 



eharaa 
vidual 
activit\ 



whirli pi-o\c no: only a source of indi 
oiiie, but also contribute to the busiuos 
id eiuerprisc of the coinniunity a: large 



JOIIX FliKDKRlCK HOHFRTZ. 

John Frederick Hohertz, now a prosperous 
farmer of Clarion township, is a self-made man, 
who came empty handed to America from Ger- 
many and has worked his way steadily upward by 
reason of his business capability and laudable am- 
bition. He was born in Prize, Poland, his father 
being Godfried Hohertz. The mother did when 
her son was only a year and a half old and he 
knows therefore nothing of her. The fat!'.er died 
in Germany. 

3Ir. Hohertz of tlii.-. review spent the firs: t\senty 
years of his life in the old world, acquiring his 
education and performing such labor as fell to his 
lot. In 18G0, when a young man of twenty years, 
he determined to try his fortune in the- United 
States, having heard favorable reports concerning 
the opjiortuuities afl'orded in the new world. Ac- 
cordingly he made his way across the Atlantic and 
took up his abode iu Clarion township. Bureau 
county, Illinois, where ho worked by the month as 
a farm hand for five years. He was for two years 
in the employ of George Hatzler and one year with 
George Charlie and later he spent two years in 
the employ of Christian Betz in the villa;:e of La 
Moille. 

On the -Ith of February, 18GC, Mr. Hohertz was 
united iu marriage to Miss Hannah Knauer, who 
was born July 2-1, 18-15, and was an adopted 
daughter of John Knauer, who lived in La Moille 
township. This marriage has been ble5--.-d with 
six children: Samuel J., John F., Amiel F.. Wil- 
lie A., Mrs. Molly Keller and Mrs. Rosie Rapp. 
The daughters are now living in La ^Moille. 

In the years iu which he was employed by oth- 
ers Mr. Hohertz carefully saved his earnings and 
when he had secured suilicient capital he iruide in- 
vestment in land and begau farming on his own 
account. As his financial resources were further 
increased he added to his original holdings and 
now owns one hundred and seventy-five acres of 
sood land in Clarion township, constituting a valu- 
able farm, which he has brought under a high 
state of cultivation. He now has a beautiful home 
and the shade trees which adorn the pla.:e were 
planted bv his own hand. He and his two sons 
work the 'farm together and this property is the 
visible evidence of his life of industry and thrift. 
He certainly deserves much credit for what he has 
accomplished, for he arrived in America with prac- 
tically nothing and worked most diligently and 
industriously iu order to gain a start. Now he is 
enabled to enjov the comforts and some of the 
luxuries of life,'his farm bringing to him a good 
annual income. In his political views he is an 
earnest republican and is thoroughly in sympathy 



(i!)G 



AST A^'L) ri;]'s;EXT uf j:l-j;i-:au cul--\tv. 



witli the pniuiiile.s of tlir party. l\>i- two years 
he served as road commissioner, but has never been 
active as a politician in the sense of uilicc seeking. 
Both he and liis wife are members of the Lntiieran 
church. 

John F. Hohcrtz, son of Frederick and Hannah 
(Knauer) Ilohertz, acquired liis eduiation in the 
district schools of Clarion township, lie was bora 
April 7, 1SG9, and is living upon his father".'. 
farm. His brother, William A. Ilohertz, was born 
in 1873 and likewise obtained his education in the 
public schools. I'utting aside their text-books, 
they became associated with tlieir father in his 
farming operations and are no^^• his active assist- 
ants in carrying on the home place, both being 
recognized as young men of good business ability 
and marked enterprise. 



families of the county and ha-, resided in this 
part of the state from pioneer times, so that he 
has witnessed its development from a frontier 
district into one of the best farming sections of 
this great commonwealth. 



GEOEGB W. IIEXSEL 
George W. Hensel now owns and occupies what 
is known as the old Hensel farm in Dover town- 
ship. His father, James Hensel, was born in 
Pennsylvania, June 24, 180T, and came to Bureau 
county in 1853, reaching his destination on the 
2d of" October. He traveled by rail to La Salle 
county and then -walked across the country to this 
county. He was married twice, his first wife 
being Lydia Fockler, who was born in ISOo. His 
second wife, who bore the maiden name of Mary 
Frease, was born in Pennsylvania, July 11, 1833. 
By the first marriage there were six children: 
Philip, Simon, Henry, Enoch, Sarah and Elias. 
The seven children born of the second marriage 
arc John, Madison, George, Cyrus, Harvey E., 
Eliza and Elsie. 

George AV. Hensel acquired his education in the 
district schools of the county. He can remember 
the trip to Illinois, which was made by wagon 
from Ohio. The father came ahead of his wife 
and children and paid for the farm. Several fami- 
lies made the trip together, there being ten in 
the party. George W. Hensel, who was then a lit- 
tle lad, was reared to farm life, early becoming 
familiar with the duties and labors that fall to 
the lot of the agriculturist, and from his early 
youth was his father's assistant on the home 
place. The father prospered in his business af- 
fairs and became the owner of nine hundred and 
seventy-six acres of land. He moved to Princeton 
in 1S86 and died at the home of his daus^hter, 
Mrs. Sarah Remsburg, :May 17, 1S99. In loOO, 
when the property was divided, George W. Hensel 
came into possession of the old homestead, com- 
prising two hundred and seventeen and a half 
acres, which was originally the Sylvester Brighani 
farm, taken up by him in 1828. 

Religiously Mr. Hensel belongs to tlie Congre- 
gational church and, an independent voter, ho is 
a warm admirer of President Roosevelt. He rep- 
resents one of the old and prominent pioneer 



TIMOTHY IMIVXE. 

Timoth}- Rhyiie, a farmer and stock-raiser re- 
siding on section 32, Selby township, Bureau 
county, where he owns a well improved farm of 
three hundred and twent)"-seveu acres, was born in 
this county, June 13, 1SJ7, and is a son of John 
C. and Piussoua (Scarl) Rhyne. The father was 
born in Zanesville, Ohio, where he was reared to 
the age of nine years, and then left home and went 
south, following the river for a number of years. 
When about twenty or twenty-one years of age ho 
went to Hennepin, Illinois, locating in Leepertown 
township, wliere he made his home for many years. 
About 1870 ho removed to Selby township. Bu- 
reau county, which continued to be his home until 
he was called to his final rest in August, 1831, 
when he had readied tlie age of fifty years. He 
was a democrat in his political views, and served 
as supcr\isor of Leepertown township before re- 
moving to this county, for several years. He was 
a memlicr of the Christian church. His wife, 
Russena (Searl) Rhyne, was a native of Ohio, and 
when a child accompanied her parents on their 
removal to Bureau county. The}- located on a 
farm in Selby township, a part of which is now 
owned by the subject of this review. Her death 
occurred in July, ISDl, when slie had rcaehed the 
age of about fifty-seven years. In the family of 
Mr. and ]\Irs. John C. Rhyne were five children, of 
whom one daughter died in infancy, the others 
being Mrs. Alvaretta E. Ring, a resident of Tis- 
kilwa; Timothy, the subject of this review; Mrs. 
Mary A. Ireland, residing on a farm in Leeper- 
town township; and John A., who is married and 
carries on farming near Tiskihva. 

Timothy Rhyne was reared in much the usual 
manner of farm lads, and received his education 
in the Ridge school of Selby township. After put- 
ting aside his text-books he engaged in farming on 
his own account in Selby township, where he Is 
now the owner of three hundred and twenty-seven 
acres of well improved land, on which are found 
all modern improvements and accessories. He is 
also engaged in stock-raising, and finds this a 
very profitable business. 

5lr. Rhyne was married in 1879 to Miss Lillie 
B. Smith, a native of Bureau county and a daugh- 
ter of W. R. and Susanna (Hartzell) Smith, resi- 
dents of Selby township. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Rhyne have been bora eight childrcJi. one of whom, 
Lillian, the fourth in order of birth, died August 
IS, 1902, at the age of fifteen years. Those sur- 
viving are: Myrtle, at home; Gertrude, the wife 
of Kelly Ii'irhardson, residing in Nebraska, who 



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PAST AM) l'j;i:SENT OF BUJfEAU COU.NTY. 



is the luothfi- uf our child, Waluiila; Chdc, 
Charles, Ilazol, .loseph and Darleno, all at Iwiuu 
witli tlieir parents. 

In liis politii.-al views Mr. Eln-ue ii a deiaocrat, 
atui for twelve years served as road eoiumissioiicr, 
on tlie expiration of whieh period he resigned the 
otlice. In his religious I'ailh he is a Congrega- 
tionalist, attending services at Bureau and at 
li'idgi'. A native oi' Bureau count}-, Mr. li'hyne 
has spent liis entire life here, and has, \>y the care- 
ful supervision of his business interests, becouie 
one of the prosperous and iuflueutial residents of 
his township, where he is held iu high regard, not 
only iu his own \ icinity, hul throughout llie culire 
county. 



LOUIS H. n. OBERSCIIKLf. 

Louis II. II. Obersclielp is identified with the 
industrial interests of Greenville township as a 
manufacturer of tile and brick and is an enter- 
prising business man, watchful of opportunities 
and energetic in all that he nndortakcs. lie was 
born in St. Louis, ^Missouri, October G, 1S53, a 
son of Ilenuan IT. and ITannali (Xiderlonum) 
Oberschelp, in whose family were three children, 
but the youngest died in infancy. Gottlieb H. is a 
brick and tile manufacturer of Princeton. Both 
parents were natives of Prussia, Germany, and the 
mother died ■\\hen our subject was quite young. 
The father was born August 20, 1820, and came 
to the United States iu ISIS, landing in Xew Or- 
leans. Two years later he removed to St. Louis, 
where he was first married, and in IS.jG came to 
Bureau count}-, taking up his residence in Prince- 
ton, lie M'as again married April 29, 18-59, his sec- 
ond union being with Katherine Dremann, by 
whom he had seven children, namely: Plerman 
and Mina, who died young; Annie, now th.e wife 
of John Harrison, a brick and tile manufacturer 
of ilineral ; William, also a resident of [Mineral; 
John, who was killed on the railroad at Jlarvs- 
ville, Kansas; IMary, wife of Fred Utlioff, "of 
Princeton ; and Henry, a brick and tile manufac- 
turer of Ohio, Illinois. 

Louis H. n. Oberschelp acquired his education 
in the public school^ of Princeton, where he resided 
until ISSO, when at the age of twenty-seven years 
he took up his abode in Xew Bedford. Here he 
established a brick and tile factory and has since 
conducted the business, having a well equipped 
plant supplied with the latest improved machinery 
for carrying on work of this kind. He owns 
thirty-six acres of choice land on section 32, 
Greenville township, whereon stands his brick and 
tile factory. In addition to this he also has 
four hundred and eighty acres in Tunica county, 
ifississippi, valued at twentv-tive dollars per acre. 

On the 24th of October. 'iSTS, :\rr. Oberschelp 
was unitrd in uiarria-e to Mi- Annie :\r. I'rin-rr, 
who was born in Riirlin-ton, Iowa, ^fareh l.\ 



lf^:.-\ and Ihcy b.vaine the j,.i rents of two chil- 
dren: Edward 11., born November G, ISSI; and 
:\[au.l 1.., September 3, 1SS3. ifr. Oberschelp 
and hi.-; family are members of the Evangelical 
Lutheran church and his political allegiance is 
given to the denioeracy, while frateruallv he is 
connected with the [Modern Woodmen can'ip, Xo. 
ICG. He has served as school trustee for six years 
and is now- acting as supervisor of Greenville town- 
ship for fifteen years consecutivelv, his long con- 
tinuance in oHice being unmistakable proof of 
his fidelity, capability and the trust reposed in him 
by his fellow townsmen. He is numbered among 
the prominent and influential residents of Grceu° 
ville township, who is deeply interested in the 
work of improvements and upbuilding here and 
withholds his support from no movement which 
he believes will prove beneficial to the county. At 
the same tinie he is carefully conducting his busi- 
ness interests. He had only a small inheritance 
when he started out in life, but he has v,-orked hard 
and by good nuinagemcnt has become one of the 
men of affluence in his community. His is one 
of the largest tile factories in the county and the 
output is nnsui'passcd in quality, so that the prod- 
uct finds a ready sale on the "market. Tlis chief 
attention is given to his manufacturing interests 
and in this connection ho has met with well 
mei'ited success. 



w]i;iJA:\r louis goluixg. 

William Louis Golding, a well kno\\-n farmer 
and stock-raiser of Wyanet township, who has also 
been active and influential in community affairs, 
having been honored through election to various 
local offices, was born September 13, 18C0, about 
two miles south of Wyanet. The parents were 
Edw-ard and Sarah Golding. who were born in 
England, living near Cambridge. Emigrating to 
America, Edward Golding landed in Xew York 
city July G. 18.5-1, and took up his aliode in 
Bureau county upon the farm which he now 
owns on section 2S, Wyanet township, the same 
month. The first few years after his arrival were 
spent in working by the month as a farm hand and 
in the winter of lS-51-o he was employed at farm 
labor at thirteen dollars per month. He is still 
living, being now in his eighty-second year. In 
the family were seven children, six of whom yet 
survive. 

W. L. Golding of this review attended the ' 
Sunny Knoll school located a mile and a half 
south'of the village of Wyanet. There his educa- 
tion was acquired entirely save for one term 
spent as a student in the high school in Wyanet. 
He lived the active, free life of a farmer boy and 
laid the foundation for his future career upon his 
father's homestead through the actual experience 
which he had in the work of th.e fields. Plis educa- 
tion completed, he turned his attention to farming 



PAST AND FKl^SEXT OF BUJJi'AL" COUM'V, 



and stock-rai.-ing. lie uow resides in the i^uutli- 
east pari uf the viUage of WyaueL ou the T. C'lark 
Hays farm on section 21, Wyanet township, and in 
the year 1901 he purchased the farm known as the 
Manrose place ou sections 21 and 22 of the same 
township. He follows diversified farming, raising 
corn, oats, timothy, clover and alfalfa, and he also 
engages to some extent in the live stock business, 
raising horses, cattle and hogs. He, however, 
makes a specialty of hogs, annually raising from 
three to five hundred for the market. 

On the 2d of March, 1893, Mr. Golding was 
married to Sliss Mable Hays, a daughter of T. 
Clark Hays, and in 1902 he was called upon to 
mourn the loss of his wife, who passed away on the 
29th of August of that year, after a happy married 
life of-about nine years. She left two daughters, 
Hazel and Mable Alice, aged respectively twelve 
and three years. 

Mr. Golding has been called to fill various posi- 
tions of public trust. He has served as town clerk 
and assessor and has also been a school director, 
and at intervals for nine years has been clerk and 
president of the school board. In polities he has 
always been a republican, never faltering in his 
allegiance to the party because he believes its 
principles are most contlucive to good government. 
In his business interests ho is now prospering and 
is the owner of one hundred and fifty-six acres of 
good land near Wyanet in addition to which he is 
farming the quarter section belonging to his fa- 
ther-in-law, which adjoins the village. 



GEOKGE G. McMAXIS. 
George G. Mc^Ianis, who became a resident of 
Bureau county in the fall of 18-13 and is therefore 
numbered among its pioneer residents, since which 
time he has been an interested witness of the 
changes which have occurred as the work of de- 
velopment has been carried forward, is now en- 
gaged in bridge contracting and building, to which 
enterprise he has directed his labors since 1870. 
His birth occurred in Clinton county, Ohio, in 
1831. He is a son of George and Louisa (Mc- 
Ilwane) Mc>rani3, the former a native of Ken- 
tucky, being born in that state in 1804, and the 
latter of Ohio. Coming to Bureau county at an 
early epoch in its development, the father estab- 
lished his home some distance southeast of Prince- 
ton in the fall of 1SI3. He had previously, how- 
ever, visited the county and had entered a claim 
in Arispie township in 1836, to which he brought 
the family seven years later. There he carried 
on general farming, placing a wild and unim- 
proved tract of land under a high state of cultiva- 
tion and thus transforming it into a valuable farm. 
In connection witli the work of tilling the soil he 
was also active in the ministry of the Christian 
church and preached for many years in this county. 
He also figured in political service, filling tin- 



ofllcc of county judge for one term. In later years 
he removed to Kansas and finally to Texas, where 
he died in 1888 at the age of eiglity-four years. 
His wife, who was born in 1804, passed away in 
Kansas in 1873. They were people of the highest 
respectability, enjoying in large measure the 
friendship and goodwill of those with whom they 
were associated. The father gave his early politi- 
cal allegiance to the whig party and upon its 
dissolution joined the ranks of the new republican 
party. In the family were five sons and one 
daughter who came to Bureau county, while two 
had died in Ohio. All are now deceased with the 
exception of George G. McManis and his brother 
William, who resides in Texas. The latter, after 
active military service, returned from the army 
as major in the Ninth Illinois Cavalry. 

George G. Mc^Manis received rather meager 
educational privileges but had the benefit of one 
term's instruction in Smith's private school at 
Princeton. He resided upon the home farm until 
about twenty-five years of age and was an able 
assistant in the work of field and meadow, early 
becoming familiar with all the duties and labors 
consequent upon the development and cultivation 
of a farm. He spent three years in Livingston 
county and since that time has resided in Princeton 
and in Bureau county. Prior to 1870 he followed 
both farming and blacksmithing, but since that 
year he has been engaged in contracting for the 
building of bridges. He has built many bridges, 
mostly ou public highways, and at the present time 
is associated with his son, C. J. .McManis, the 
firm being known as Mc^Ianis & Son. He has 
handled a great many bridge contracts in the past 
thirty-five or thirty-six years and altogether his 
business has been an e.vteusive, important and prof- 
itable one. He does excellent work in this con- 
nection and in this line of building activity is 
well known. 

Mr. McManis was married in Livingston county, 
Illinois, in lS-58, and by this union had three 
children: Clark, who is now postmaster of Prince-, 
ton; William, who is filling the office of deputy 
circuit clerk; and Harry, who is assistant postmas- 
ter. The three sons are representative young 
business men and have been successful in their 
chosen fields of labor. 

In his political views Mr. Mc^Iauis is a stalwart 
republican. He cast his first presidential ballot 
for Fillmore iu 1853 and in 1S5G supported John 
C. Fremont, since which time he has never failed 
to give his political allegiance to the candidates 
at the head of the republican ticket. Reading and 
investigation have kept him thoroughly informed 
concerning the political questions of the day and 
his citizenship is characterized bv the utmost de- 
votion to the general good. Fraternally he is a 
member of the Masonic order and has attained the 
Knight Templar dcgreo in Temple commandery 
of Princeton, while his religious faith is indicated 
by his nicniluTslu'p in the Christian church. His 



I'AST AX 



jm;i;s1;: X' 



OF iu;j;i:ai 



(OLXTV 



ly covurs ;i period ol' almost 
uiy, as in boyhooil da^s he 



residt'iiie in the 

two-thirds of a 

arrived here and since that time has been a factor 

in its progress, and has -n-rouglit for the present 



prosi.e 



itv and advanced conditions which toda\ 



.t in this part of the state. 



JA:i[ES E. POKTERFIEI^D. 

James E. I'ortertlchl, president of tlie Miller- 
Devlin Lumber Company, of Spring A'alley, and 
of the Toluca Lmnher & Hardware Company, of 
Toluca, was born near Dover, in Bureau county, 
October 9, 1S49. His parents were James and 
and Eliza (Brigham) Poi'terfield, the former a 
native of Ohio and the latter of New Hampshire. 
The father came to this county in 1836, casting in 
his lot with the pioneer settlers and was engaged 
in farming in the vicinity of Dover until 1SS3, 
when he removed to Greenwood county, Kansas, 
where he resided until his death, which occurred 
in 1895, when he was eighty-one ' years of age. 
He had long survived his wife, who died in this 
county at the age of forty-three years. j\rr. Por- 
terfield figured prominently in connection with the 
early history of the county, leaving the impress 
of his individuality upon many events of historic 
importance. He was a friend of Owen Lovejoy, 
and was active in taking care of the slaves who, 
prior to the war, fled from their hard taskmasters 
of the south and sought freedom in Canada. He 
was a zealous aiid enthusiastic anti-slavery man, 
doing everything in his power to further opposition 
to the cause of slavery, his home being a station 
on the famous underground railroad. 

James E. Porterfield, whose name introduces 
this record, enjoyed ih.e benefits of the educational 
privileges afforded in Dover Academy, and after 
completing his own studies taught for four years 
in the schools of Bureau county. He afterward 
engaged in farming near Spring Valley, but in 
1889 withdrew from agricultural pursuits and 
turned his attention to merchandising in the town. 
He carried on that business for two years, after 
which he became a lumber dealer in 1891 and has 
continued in this line of trade to the present time. 
He is now president of the Toluca Lumber & 
Hardware Company, of Toluca, and also of the 
Miller-Devlin Lumber Company, of Spring Valley, 
and is secretary of the Devlin Coal Company at 
Toluca. His business interests are Thu= evten^ive 
and important and in their control he displays 
keen discernment, marked sagacity and unfa'tering 
diligence and perseverance — qualities which are es- 
sential factors in the honorable acquirement of 
success. 

In 1372 Mr. Porterfield was united in marriage 
to iliss Icedora ililler, a daughter of Henry J. 
driller, one of the most prominent and respected 
citizens of Bureau counts Thev have two dnuuh- 
ters: Edna 'S[.. who Wf^'bnr:! November 14, 1873, 



and IS the wife of C. A. Brown, of Toluea; and 
Ada Lois, who was born Scjitembier LS, ISSJ, and 
is the wife of Harry E. Trovilh., of Topcka, 
Kansas. 

Mr. ajid Mrs. Porterfield hold membership in 
the Congregational church, taking an active part in 
its work and doing all in their power to pi'omote its 
growth and extend its influence. ^Mr. Porterfield 
IS acting as one of the trustees and deacons of the 
church and gives his political support to the re- 
publican party. He has made steady advancement 
in his busines.s career and each step wliich he has 
taken has been a forward one, bringing him a 
broader outlook and wider opportunities. He has 
utilized his advantages auvl as the yeai-s have gone 
by has gained for himself a place among the "sub- 
stantial, enterprising and successful business men 
of his native count v. 



WILLI A^{ BOH.M. 

William Bohm, a lifelong farmer, who now owns 
and cultivates three hundred and fifteen acres on 
sections 13 and 23, Walnut township, Bureau 
county, has made nearly all of the improvements 
upon this place. He built his own home, has add- 
ed other commodious and substantial buildings 
and set out nearly all of the trees, which add so 
much to the value and attractive appearance of 
the place. That he started out in life empty- 
handed and is now a prosperous citizen makes him 
worthy of the proud American title of a "■'self- 
made man." 

Born in Germany, Dccemlier 1, 1856, Mr. Bohm 
is a son of John and Mary (Wolf) li.ihm, who 
were likewise natives of tbat country. They came 
to America with their throe children, Joe, ;\Iimiic 
and William, and after living in Chicago for two 
years the wife and mother died. The father after- 
ward removed to Depue, Illinois, and his last 
years were spent in Manlius township. Bureau 
county, where his death oecured in ISSG. 

William liohm was educated in the schools of 
his native country and has always followed farm- 
ing as a source of livelihood. He was married at 
the age of twenty-six years, to Christina Edlef- 
son, who was born in Germany, April 11, ISG-i. 
and at the age of seven years was brought to 
America bv her parents, who settled in Princeton, 
where they still reside. The father was a baker 
bv trade but is now living retired. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Bohm were born eleven children, three of 
whom died in infancy, of these, Minnie, bcin^ but 
four niontlis old at the tinje of her demise. Those 
living are Edward, John, William, Emma, Ar- 
thur. Carl. Jennie and Lester. 

When 'Mr. Bohm was married and began farm- 
ing on his own account he borrowed fifty dollars. 
The end of the second year found him in debt to 
the extent of seven liundred dollars, owing to his 
r.urchas.- of hor- ^. t^ols and other noeried supplies 



703 



PAST x\XD i'i;i:sEXT or Bur.EAu cou>;ty. 



for the farm work. That ho li^cd i'ru-ally aud 
was industrious iii the eaidier years is indicated by 
the fact that he is now the owner of three hundred 
and fifteen acres of valuable land on sections 13 
and 23, Wahiut townshi}), and though the neces- 
sity for continued arduous latior is no more, he is 
still a diligent nian^ personally superintendiniT his 
farming interests. He raises corn and hay and 
feeds some hogs, and the products of the farm 
bring him a good financial return annually. He 
now has fine buildings upon his place, which is 
one of the best farms of the township. He paid 
thirty dollars per acre for one quarter section of 
his land and eight years ago he gave fifty-five dol- 
lars per acre for a quarter section on section 23 — 
today worth more than double that price. !Mr. 
Eojim alTiliatcs with the Princeton lodge of Odd 
Fellows, but has given his attention mostly to his 
farming interests and his perseverance and per- 
sistency is indicative of his life of thrift, enter- 
prise and carefully directed labor. 



WILLIAM MAKTIX JOIIXSOX. 

"William Martin Johnson, a veteran of the Civil 
war, now engaged in general farming and stock- 
raising, was born in licking county, Ohio, October 
22, 1843. His parents were Lemuel and Sarah 
(Eobinson) Johnson. The father was a farmer 
and carpenter. Born in Virginia, he afterward 
became a resident of Licking county, Ohio, where 
he resided until his son "William was about two 
and a half years of age, when he brought the fam- 
ily to IllLiiois, establishing his home in Bureau 
county in ISiG. 

Mr. Johnson of this review has therefore spent 
almost his entire life in Bureau county. He was 
here reared, while his education was acquired in 
the country schools, and during the periods of va- 
cation his time and energies were devoted to farm 
labor. After putting aside his text-books he con- 
tinued to assist in the operation of the home farm 
until 1SG4, when he enlisted as a member of Com- 
pany K, Fifty-seventh Illinois Regiment, in de- 
fense of the Union cause. He was then oidy 
twenty years of age. At Chicago he was mustered 
in and was sent first to Louisville, Keatacky. He 
took part in a number of important military move- 
ments and engagements, participating in the bat- 
tles of Athens, Alabama, Resaca and Pome, Geor- 
gia, Chattahoochee, the siege of Atlanta, and the 
engagements at Altoona Pass and Peach Tree 
Creek. With his regiment he then went to Pome, 
where he remained until the evacuation of At- 
lanta and later he proceeded to Jonesboro and on 
to Savannah, Georgia. He went with his regi- 
ment through South Carolina, northward to Golds- 
boro and to Ealeigh, Xorth Caroliaa, thence to 
Petersburg, Virginia, and on to Washington, where 
the close of the war was fittingly celebrated iu a 
splendid military pageant known as the grand 



rcvirw, in which he participared on the 23d of 
Llay, 1SG5. The regiment a;'ier\\ard proceeded 
to Louisville, Kentucky, where he was mustered 
out on the 2;th of June and on the 27th of July 
he was honorably discharged at Chicago. Thus 
ended his military service in defense of the Union, 
during which he made a creditable record by his 
valor and loyalty. 

When the war was over Mr. Johnson returned 
to Bureau county, where he has since been en- 
gaged in farming and stock-raising and he is today 
a leading representative of the agricultural inter- 
ests of this locality. He has a good tract of land 
which he has brotight under a high state of cul- 
tivation and has placed thereon many modern and 
substantial improvt-monts. 

On the 1.5th of November, ISGG, Mr. Johnson 
was united iu marriage to Mis; Minnie Kentz, a 
daughter of Henry Kentz, whose father was a 
farmer and lived iu Concord township. Bureau 
county. They had three sons and a daughter: 
Henry Oscar, who was born September 9, 1871, 
and is now engaged in fanning in this county; 
Lemuel Andrews, who was born August 2, 187G, 
and is a railroad contractor in Wyoming; Fj-ank 
Bentiett, who v,-as born February 27, 1880, and 
was killed at a railroad crossing "^farcli 23, 1905 ; 
and Lula Belle, who was cduca::a in the country 
schools and in Budn and is still at homo with her 
parents. 

In his political views Mr. Johnson is a stal- 
wart republican and has many times been a dele- 
gate to the county and senatorial conventions of 
his party, in the work and succcs; of which he is 
deeply interested because he believes its principles 
are most conducive to good government. He has 
been honored with various local o'izjcs by his fellow 
townsmen, who recognize his worth and ability 
and who thus manifest their confidence iu him. 
He has been school director for ir.-enty years and 
at the present writing, in 3 90G, is holding the 
office of road coiamissioner, in ^\hicli capacity he 
has served for three terms or a touU of nine years. 
He was also overseer of the roads ior about twenty 
years and officially and as a pr;-. ate citizen has 
done much to improve the public highways. He 
holds membership in the First Br.ptist church of 
Buda and is a member of Plmeiy post, Xo. 198, 
G. A. P. of Buda, of which he ha; been officer of 
the day for many years. In ma-.-ers of citizen- 
ship he is alwa\s as loyal in days of peace as he 
was in times of war and has a deep rooted at- 
tachment for the stars and stripes. 



NICHOLAS HEINZE. 
Nicholas Heinze, who in matters of citizenship 
as well as in his business career has demonstrated 
his right to the conti'lence and cse^om which are 
uniformly accorded him by his h'.'.ow townsmen, 
is now living iu Ohio township, having for twenty- 




W. M. J01L\S0X. 



I'AST AM) IM.'KSKX'J- Ol- J]!' 



AL' L'Ol N'J'V, 



705 



two years iiunle his Imnic updii his pn.st'iit. farm, 
wliich compri::>es eighty acres. lie was born in liCc 
county, Illinois, December 17, 1S70, and his par- 
ents, Andrew and Jlargaret (Eichoru) Ileinze, 
were natives of Germany. In a family of four 
children he is the youngest. The mother was 
twice married, her first husband being John 
Shcllcr, who died leaving a daughter, Anna 
Slieller. 

In tlie Bureau county public schools Nicholas 
lleinze obtained his education and after putting 
aside his text-books he began fanning on his own 
account, and has since followed that pursuit. lie 
not only raises grain and hay, but also cattle 
and hogs for the market. His father died nine 
years ago, on the 30th of June, 1897, since which 
time Mr. Heinze of this review has had charge 
of the home farm, caving for his mother and 
sister. The place comprises eighty acres of land 
and it has been his homo for twenty-two years. 
The fields are now under a high state, of cultiva- 
tion and return good crops. The equipments are 
all modern and everything about the place is in- 
dicative of the care and supervision of a practical, 
progressive ov/ner. His political views find evi- 
dence in the support which he gives to tlic re- 
publican party. The family belong to the German 
Lutheran church and are highly esteemed socially. 
Friends and neighbors speak of jMr. Heinze in 
terms of high praise and warm regard by reason 
of his genuine personal worth ancl the excellent 
traits of character which he has displayed in as- 
suming the care of the home property, thus pro- 
viding for his mother and sister. He deserves 
all the success that has come to him and will 
undoubtedly win a still larger measure of 
properity in the future, for he possesses those traits 
which ever lead to advancement and enable the 
individual to pass upon life's highway others who 
perhaps started out more advantagcouslv than 
himself. 



HENKY FAHS. 

Henry Fahs, nunibi'n'd among tli>^ wi'le-awake 
and enterprising young farmers of Ohio township, 
is now engaged in operating and managing a place 
of one hundred and twenty acres. He is num- 
bered among Bureau county's native sons, his birth 
having occurred within its borders on the 2d of 
August, ISSO. His parents were Fred and IIb.tj 
Fahs, natives of Gornuuiy, who came to America 
at an early day and established their home in 
this county. As the years passed their marriage 
was blessed with a family of eight children. 

Henry Fahs, the sixth in order of birth, was 
reared in the usual manner of farmer lads and 
his education was largely acquired in the public 
schools of Lee county, although in the school of 
experience he has learned riiany practical and 
valuable lessons. He was earlv traincil to farm 
work and came to a realizati.jn of tlio value of 



thrift and iu'lu=lry as factors in the achievement of 
success. He is now manager of an excellent 
farm of one hundred and twenty acres in Ohio 
township and his early training in the fields has 
stood him in good stead as the years have gone by. 

ilr. Fahs was united in marriage to !Mis3 Lena 
Spohn, who was born in Leo county, Illinois, No- 
vember 14, ISyu. The wedding wa-- celebrated 
December 12, 1S99, and has been'blessed with two 
children: Fred W., born November 18, 1902; 
and Louis F., born May 27, 190-5. Mrs. Fahs' 
parents were John and ilary (Houck) Spohn, the 
former a native of Germany and the latter of 
Buft'alo, New York. In the family were twelve 
children, the father having been married twice, 
and five were born of the first marriage and seven 
by the second marriage. 

Mr. Fahs in his religious faith is conneclL-d with 
the German Lutheran church, while his wife is a 
communicant of the lioman Catholic church. His 
political support is given the republican party, 
but he has neither time nor inclination for public 
oflice, finding that his business aft'airs make con- 
tinuous demands upon his energies. He is steadily 
progressing and it will probably not be long before 
he is in possession of a farm of his own. He is 
a good citizen, worthy of the confiuencc of friends 
and neigldjors, and has made a creditable record 
for one of his vears. 



WILliUl! H. FATE. 

Wilbur II. Fate, who i'ullo\is farming on sec- 
tion 30, ]\Iilo township, was born in this township 
September 31, 1859. His father, Johnson M. 
Fate, ■now deceased, was born near Dcavertown, 
Ohio, in 1835 and came to Illinois in 1846, settling 
in ;\riIo township about a mile and a half east of 
the farm on which our subject now resides. He 
wedded ^fary Jane Reed froiu Ohio, a sister of 
L. H. Feed, of ililo township, and the three chil- 
dren born of this union are: Wilbur H. ; John R., 
who is living in Bradford; and Francis A., who is 
a Congregational nunister and resides in Middle- 
field, :Mas.=achusetts. The death of the father oc- 
curred ^farch 16, 1900, while his wife passed away 
in 1901. 

Wilbur H. Fate is indebted to the common- 
school system of Milo township for the early edu- 
cational privileges which he enjoyed and which 
were suppleuiented by study in Wcsleyan Univer- 
sity at Abingdon, Illinois. Later he was gradu- 
ated from Evergreen City Business College at 
Bloomington, this state, in 1880. His training 
for the work of the fields was received under his 
father's direction, for at an early age he took his 
place behiiul the plow and did other work con- 
nected with the developiueni of the fields. Ho has 
always carried on fanning and stock-raising and 
now 'feeds numy cattle and hogs annually. His 
landed possessions comprise one hundred and fifty 



70G 



PAST AVD PilEyEXT OF I'.UJH'AU COfXTY. 



acres of fine land where he now iivcs, aud he also 
OWES another tract of one hundred and twenty 
acres. He has one of the best and finest lionies 
to be found in Milo township and it is surrounded 
by beautiful shade trees, every one of which lias 
been planted by him, togetlier with the shrubs 
and flowers about the farm, rendering this one 
of the most attractive and pleasing features in the 
landscape. Tlicre are also good barns upon the 
place and everything is in e.xeclh'nt shape, the 
farm being well improved jind tlie fields care- 
fully cultivated. 

Mr. Fate ^vas married to Miss Anna J. Foster, of 
Bradford, a daughter of Charles Foster, aud tliey 
now have four children, ifaniie, who is a graduate 
of the Bradford high school aud is continuing her 
education in Evanston; Ijcna, Ivan and Grace, 
all yet at home. The parents and children are 
members of the ^Methodist Episcopal church at 
Bradford and occupy an enviable position in 
social cii'cles \\here true worth and intelligence are 
received as the passports into good society. Po- 
litically Mr. Fate is a republican and has served 
as school director foi fourti_-en years, while for 
many years he was road commissioner. He be- 
longs to the Modern Woodmen camp and in all 
life's relaticns is found true to every trust and 
upholds a higli standard of conduct by a life 
■which is indicative of manly principles which 
permeate it. 



CLAYTO^' C. PEKYlEi:. 

Clayton C. Pervier, whose influence has been 
far-reaching and his labors beneficial in the lines 
of agricultural and political activity in Bureau 
county, stands at all times for advancement. His 
position is never an equivocal one and he is not a 
theorist nor an idealist, but utilizes practical 
methods that produce results, so that his opinions 
carry weight and his ideas are carefully con- 
sidered, whether expressed upon some subject 
bearing upon the farming interests or the great 
political questions which affect the state at large. 

Mr. Pervier is one of Bureau county's native 
sons, his birth having occurred in Mineral town- 
stip, March 4, 1857. He is a son of the Eev. 
Sylvester L^ne Pervier, whose history is found 
on another page. His boyhood days were spent 
at'home and he attended the jiuhlie scliools until 
sixteen years of age, when he continued his studies 
tinder Professor George B. Harrington, at Anna- 
wan. He also began teaching about the same 
time, following the" profession in Kewanee town- 
ship, Henry county. Fie taught in the winter 
months, attended school in the spring and fall 
and worked on the farm in the summer, so that 
the year was a busy one, with few idle hours. He 
continued to engage in teaching through the win- 
ter seasons for sixteen years and he follov.ed 
farming on the old homestead until 1SS7, when 



he came to his present home. In the meantime, 
in Ls:.-), !io had entered the I'liiversity of Illi- 
nois, at Urbana, where he remained as a student 
for two years, and then when his funds were ex- 
hausted he returned to the farm. His education 
was thus acquired under some difficulty, but he 
has embraced every opportunity for extending his 
knowledge and has been a broad reader. Ho is 
a practical farmer and is prominently identified 
with the agricultural interests oi the state, keep- 
ing in close touch with the work of the experiment 
station and the United States department of agri- 
culture. He has been three tinics chosen presi- 
dent of the Bureau County Farmers Institute 
and is now- secretary of that organization. He is 
also a state farmers' institute Kcturer, in which 
connection he is r.-idely kno\\-n throughout Illi- 
nois, and that he is a popular speaker on the 
themes which he handles is indicated by the fact 
that he is frequently recalled to the places where 
he has once lecturei]. A practical demonstration 
of his theories and proof of his opinions is found 
on his own farm, which is a splendidly improved 
property, on which the work is carried forward 
along modern scientific lines with results that are 
most adrairable and desirable. He received from 
the governor of Illinois appointment as delegate 
to the Farmers' Xational congress in October, 
190G, lield in Eock Island. He had received simi- 
lar appointments twice before but the long dis- 
tance of the convention city fro:.i his home pre- 
vented his attending- 

On the ICth of March, 18S1, Mr. Pervier was 
married to Miss Jes-ie :M. Curtis, who was born 
in Concord township and is a daughter of James 
^I. Curtis, whose sketch appears on another page 
of this volume. She is a graduate of the Sheffield 
high school. Unto tlicm have been born five chil- 
dren : Eaymond C, Edgar 'SI., Mabel Inez, Carrie 
May and Helen P., all at home. The parents are 
members of the FTnitarian church and !Mr. Pervier 
belongs to Ames lodg»% Xo. 1-1-2, A. F. & A. M.; 
Princeton chapter, Xe. 28, E. A. SL ; and Prince- 
ton commandery, No. "20, K. T. 

ilr. Pervier has been a factor in republican 
politics in this counry for more than a quarter 
of a century and has ever stood firm in support 
of those principles which seem best to conserve the 
public good. He has ever been opposed to mis- 
rule in political ofTico or corruption of any sort 
in the political field and his political integrity 
is unquestioned. He has been a de'.-rgate to every 
county convention, with one exception, since he 
attained his majority and has been three times 
honored with the chairmanship. He has also 
been a delegate to district and state conventions 
and has been a member of the county central 
committee for twenty years. Various local offices 
have been conferred upon him. He has been 
school trustee, assessor and collector and for six 
years represented Concord township on the board 
of supervisors, being first chosen to the office in 



PAST AND r];]':si':-\T or buiM'^ai' cocxty. 



ro7 



180-1. lie acted as cliainiian during the last 
ycai- of his service, i:JOO, and then declined re- 
election as supervisor. On the 14th of August, 
1906, at Galva lie was nominated as the republican 
candidate for the general assembly, and his past 
record is an indication of what his service will be 
if lie is elected to tlie office. ]le stands in sup- 
port of the well known principles of the party, 
believes in meotiug the issues squarely and fairly 
and in working for tiie interests of the state at 
large. His patiiotism and public spirit are unde- 
niably strong features in his life record, and aside 
from his political service he is a man of ac- 
knowledged worth in state and county, whose la- 
bors have been of direct and pernumeiit benefit in 
asricidtural circles. 



REV. S. L. PEEVIEE. 

Sylvester h. Pervier was brought up in the hill 
country of New Hampshire and enjoyed the edu- 
cational advantages of rnra' life amid rugged 
mountains, lonely valleys, flowing streams and 
green fiekls and forests. Born at Andovcr, in 
ISlC, the conimou schools, whose sessions wci'c 
from six weeks' to three month?' duration each 
year, furnislied him with tlie rudiments of learn- 
ing. At the age of sixteen he bought his time of 
his father and went into business for himself. 
Though meeting witli encouraging success lie soon 
returned home to help the family tlirough a finan- 
cial struggle. 

As he came to know himself he found hungcr- 
ings that business did not satisfy. Life to him 
had larger meaning than bread alone. Soul wants 
pre-scd him. He heard the call of religion to 
come up higher. Knowledge, vircue, truth, urged 
their demands upon him. Penelrated witli such 
sentiments he looked around for a fitting field of 
activity. It was but natural that iic should find it 
in the ministry, though painfully aware of lack of 
adequate preparation. Still he sooke to edifica- 
tion, inspired enthusiasm, and his hearers, regard- 
ing such qualities as ample proof of his being 
called to God to preach, gave him their entire 
approval. His father rejoiced that his first born 
was willing to dedicate himself to the Lord. 

At the age of twenty-two Mr. Pervier went to 
western New York to begin bis active labors as a 
minister, at the same time taking up a course 
of reading and study to better fit him for his 
chosen work. In Shelby, Orleans county, he 
planted a chuich to which he ministered some 
years and which still preserves its identitv. 

There, on the 7th of February, 1813, Rev. Per- 
Tier was united in marriage with Philena C'ovell, 
of Ogdcn, ^Innroe county, New York, who was 
born Jfay 30, l.S-20, and is a daughter of Edward 
and Polly (Gihnan) Covell, both" natives of Ver- 
mont. Jlrs. Pervier still survives her husband 
at the advanc?d age of eighty- six vears. Later he 



beeaiiie a -nissionary at JaiiCiville, Wisconsin, en- 
during nut only the hard.<hip3 and privations inci- 
dent to a new country, but much from lack of 
funds being furni.shed' by the missionary board. 
Thence lie moved to Ilenr}-, Illinois, taking charge 
of a church for which lie prcaclied four years, 
meantime superintending the building of its 
chapel. Leaving Henry he located in Prophets- 
town, Illinois, again taking up missionary work, 
depending entirely upon voluntary contributions 
for support. 

With much misgiving he finally retired from 
active service in the field, devoting; himself there- 
after to the maintenance of a hoine. Though his 
farm life continued forty years he never quite lost 
sight of his calling as a minister. He ever bore 
about with him some gospel of good news. His 
was no stereotyped message. It changed as wants 
change, as light came, as truth wa« revealed. He 
was familiar with nature, with actual things, with 
common facts. He thought much, observing the 
trend of things. He was a doubter, but all the 
more a believer. When in the progress of his 
thought the faith and methods of the popular 
church seemed no longer true and useful, they 
were displaced by others responding more to his 
reason. The verities as represented by the sermon 
on the mount he accepted ever; built his char- 
acter upon them, taught them at Iiome and abroad. 
But tlie draperies of religion — its forms, philoso- 
phies, methods — he believed must change with 
the ever changing world. February 7, 1S93, the 
forty-nintli anniversary of his marriage, pneu- 
monia claimed him for its victim. Quietly, peace- 
fully and with full assurance of a future life he 
passed away, leaving his v,-ife and four children 
to venerate his memory. Mr. and Mrs. Pervier 
became the parents of five children, but lost one 
child in infancy who was born JI'iv 25, 1S60, and 
died May 27, 1860. The surviving members of 
the family are: Melvin E., who was born in New 
York, May 2S, 13-15; Myron C, who was born in 
Janesville, Wisconsin, December bl, 1847 ; Donna 
I., who was born in this county', January 20, 1855, 
and is engaged in teaching school; and Clayton C, 
who was born March 4, 1857, and is a farmer. 
His sketch appears elsewhere in this work. 

Mehin E. Pervier, the eldest of the family, was 
educated at Henry, Illinois, and in the country 
schools. He has devoted his ent'ie time to farm- 
ing and stock-raising and he now resides and 
carries on the old family homestead in Zlfincral 
town.ship. In 1870 he went to Kansas, settling 
near Greenleaf. where he carried on general agri- 
cultural pursuits, and while there he served as 
school director. In 1S79 b^ sold his interests 
in Kansas and removed to California, where he 
engaged in fruit raising for seven years, remaining 
on the Pacific coast until ISOl, wiicn he returned 
to Mineral township, wliere he has lived continu- 
ously since, being now accounted one of the lead- 
ing and successful agriculturists of this part of 



I'As'L' AM) rL;i;si-;.\T oi 



]'.r 



AU (JUL-XTV 



the statr, his 1,111.1 bfing ^^dl dc\tloped and under 
a hi-^h statu of cultivation. 

ik'lviu E. I'ervier vas married to 5Ii=s C. 
Anna Morgan, of Kansas, a daughter of Joel 
^Morgan. The wedding was celebrated in ISCS 
and the death of the wife occurred in 187!', many 
friends, beside her family mourning her loss. 

In his fraternal relations Jlr. Pervier is a 51a- 
son, holding membership in the Blue lodge, and he 
held the ottice of junior warden while in Cali- 
fornia. He has served as assessor for three years 
and is now highway commissioner of Mineral 
town.ship. His interest in community affairs is 
deep and sincere and is manifest through tangible 
co-oporation in those measures and movement? 
which are of benelit to tlio omnumitv. 



ELI I!. :\[ATIIIS. 

Eli E. Matliis, numbered among tln' pioneer 
residents of Princeton, located there in IS-iO, 
wlien the city was a mere village, and was identi- 
fied with its growtli and development throughout 
his remaining days. He figured in business circles 
as a dealer in groceries and dry goods and lie also 
worked at the carpenter's trade. He was widely 
recognized as a man of enterprise and unfaltering 
determination, whose business methods would ever 
bear the closest investigation and scrutiny. 

A native of Oliio, Mr. Matliis was born in Ur- 
bana, Champaign county, on the 14th of January, 
1823. His parents were Jeremiah and Esther 
(Moss) Mathis, the former a native of iSi"ew Jer- 
sey and the latter of the Buckeye state. Jeremiah 
Mathis removed to Urbana, Ohio, at an early p'^r- 
iod in its development and there worked at the 
carpenter's trade until he came to the west. His 
wife died in Urbana when their son Eli was but 
eight years of age and father and sons afteru-ard 
came to Illinois together in lS-10, settling in 
Princeton, where the former worked at the car- 
penter's trade until his death on the 30th of April, 
1863. 

At the time of Iiis mother's demise Eli P. :Ma- 
this started out in life on his own account. He 
learned the carpenter's trade under the direction 
of his father and as opportunity afforded he pur- 
sued his education, continuing as a pupil in the 
old log schoolhouse in West Bureau during the 
early period of his residence here. He afterward 
began work at his trade, being first employed on 
what is known as the old ^^'illiam Chamberlain 
home. In 1855 he heliied to finish the residence 
which his widow now occupies. All through his 
life he was active and energetic, constantly watch- 
ful of opportunities, which he improved, making 
them resultant factors in the acquirement of a 
gratifying measure of success. He continued to 
work at the carpenter's trade for several years ani.l 
he assisted in building soiuc of the first business 
blocks of Princeton. lEc then tnrnf'l his att--U- 



tii.in 1(1 tliL' grocery and dr\-g>»)ds busine.-s, o, eu- 
iug a store in the" old Tenipietoii building, wiieru 
he remained for several years. He afterward re- 
sumed iiuilding operations for a few years, but 
eventually gave up all business cares and retired 
to private life. Mr. ilatliis was twice married. He 
first wedded ^Miss Matilda Green, of Bureau town- 
ship. Bureau county, who died in Princeton. Sub- 
sequently he married Jliss Esther Phillips, also 
of Bureau township and a daughter of Jolin and 
Betsy (Templiu) Phillips, both of whom were 
natives of Urbana, Ohio, whence in 1833 they 
came to Illinois, casting in their lot among the 
pioneer residents of Bureau county. They first 
lived in what was known here by the pioneers as 
the Squatters' log cabin in West Bureau, Bureau 
township, and there Mr. Phillips improved a farm 
and carried on general agricultural pursuits un- 
til 1856, when lie removed to Livingston countj-, 
Illinois, and was engaged in farming until his 
death. His wife also passed away there. In their 
family wcva five children, namely: Jlrs. Mathis; 
Mrs. E. J. Lemon, of Princeton; Levi T., a resi- 
dent farmer of Princeton township; James E., 
who is living in St. Joseph, Missouri; and Mrs. 
Sarah Leonard of Livingston county, Illinois. 
There were four children born unto !Mr. and ]\Ir5. 
Mathis; Alice M., tlie wife of A. C. Best, of 
Princeton, who is engaged in the conduct of a 
monument business here; Leslie Eli, city sales- 
man for the White Lead Company, of Kansas 
Cit}", Jliisouri, who married Alice Eeslcr and 
after her death wedded Janna S. Scroggins; Leon- 
ard Templin, who resides in Chicago, where for 
five years he has occupied the position of clerk in 
the Victoria Hotel; and Guy Eoy, who married 
Grace D. Boyd, of Springfield, Illinois, where he 
is engaged in tlic real-estate and automobile busi- 
ness. 

Eli P. ^lathis served as scliool treasurer in 
Princeton for over thirty years and was a warm 
champion of the cause of education. He took an 
active interest in politics and always voted the 
republican ticket and his ellorts e-vtended to many 
measures and movements which he deemed v.ould 
prove of value to the community in promoting its 
material, intellectual, social and moral progress. 
He was a charter member of the Odd Fellows 
lodge at Princeton, which he assisted in organiz- 
ing" in July, 1851. He always took much interest 
in temperance work and was an earnest Christian 
man, who gave liberally to the poor and needy 
and was widely known for his charitable work 
which, however, always was done in an unostenta- 
tious manner. In his business interests ho pros- 
pered, becoming well-to-do as the years passed by 
and in his later life he lived retired, enjoying a 
well earned rest until he was called to the home 
beyond on the 10th of September, 1905. 

Mrs. Mathis is a member of the :Methodist Epis- 
copal church and is identified witli various fra- 
ternal and social ortranizatious. She has been a 




Mi;,S. E. K. :\FATI1]S. 




E. i;. ^^[ATiii; 



PAST ANJJ IMJKSKXT OF IJUJIKAU COIXTY 



member of the Wuiiuia'a Club liure since it wus 
established aiiJ in fact assisted in organizing it. 
She is also connected with the Daughters of"Ee- 
bckah, the Sons of Temperance, the Good Tem- 
plars and the Women's Christian Temperance 
Union, all of Princeton — alliliations whch indi- 
cate her deep interest iu the tcinperanoe cause and 
her efforts for its pronndgation and adoption. 
She now owns and occupies a nice home at No. 
419 South Main sti'cct and she also has much oth- 
er proj)crty here, including several store buildings 
on Main street, which return to her a good rental. 
The name of ilathis lias for abmit two-thirds of 
a century been associated with Princeton and its 
interests and Eli E. Mathis is justly numbered 
among the. honored jtioueers. 



OSCAE M. LYLL. 

Oscar M. Lyle, who is living on a farm in Xe- 
pouset, township, was born in this township, De- 
cember 8, 1SG7. Ilis parents were Stephen D. 
and Eliza W. (Hatch) Lyle. The father was 
born in Vermont, February 4, 1833, a son of 
William and Atlanta (]3arling) Lyle, the former 
a native of Scotland and the latter of Vermont. 
William Lyle was one of the pioneer residents of 
Stark county, Illinois, where he died at the age 
of fifty-five years, while his wife passed away at 
the age of seventy-seven years. In their family 
were fifteen children, of whom lourtecn reached 
years of maturity, while nine are still living. 
Steplien D. Lyle of this family pursued his edu- 
cation in the public schools of Illinois, having 
been brouglit by his parents to this state when 
four years of age. He was reared amid the wild 
scenes of frontier life, sharing with the family in 
the hardships and trials incident to a pioneer ex- 
istence. On the 10th of February, 1854, he mar- 
ried Miss Eliza W. Hatch, who was born in \'c-r- 
mont, April 15, 1832, and was a daughter of 
Moses and Jane (Gates) Hatch, who were like- 
wise natives of the Green Mountain State. In 
their family were five childien, all of whom have 
passed away, with the exception of Mrs. Lyle. The 
father died at the age of si.xty-five years, while the 
mother departed this life at 'the age of thirty-six, 
and both, spent their entire lives in Vermont. 

Stephen D. Lyle began farming on his own ac- 
count in Stark county, and in 1857 removed to 
Bureau county, locating first on eighty acres of 
land in Neponset township. This was wild prairie, 
for which he paid si.x dollars and a quarter per 
acre. That he prospered in his undertakings is in- 
dicated by the fact that he added to his property 
from time to time until his landed possessions ag- 
gregated four hundred and twenty-five acres, of 
which one hundred and si.xty acres was in Iowa. 
He first built a house sixteen by twenty-four feet, 
and subsequently erected a fine residence at a cost 
of about five thousand dollars. He carried on gen- 



eral farjiiing until 1S;)0, when he bought a liomc 
in the village of Xeponset, and in 100 The erected 
a residence there which he has since occupied. He 
has served as school director for nine years and as 
road commissioner for three or four terms, and the 
various duties that have devolved upon liim have 
ever been discharged with promptness and fidelity. 
His political allegiance is given to the republican 
party. He is accounted one of the foremcst resi- 
dents of Bureau county, having figured for many 
years as a prominent agriculturist, while his suc- 
cess indicates him to be a man of more than ordi- 
nary ability. In the family there wore three sons: 
Charles, who was born December 7, 1854; Her- 
Ijcri, who is represented elsewliere iu this work; 
and Oscar M. 

The last named is now living upon the old home- 
stead farm, where his entire life has been passed. 
He attended the public schools in his boyhood 
days, and after putting a.slde his text-books de- 
voted his entire attention to general agricultural 
pursuits. He is now successfully farming one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land, and he anuallv ships 
about a carload of hogs of his own raising. He 
also huj-s and ships about twenty carloads of hogs 
and cattle each year, dealing "more extensively, 
however, in cattle. He is alsD a breeder of Morgan 
horses, and has a fine stallion, half Morean and 
half standard bred on the dam side. He" is well 
known as a representative^ of the farming and 
stock-raising interests of Neponset township and 
his native county, and in business afl^airs is alert, 
enterprising and progressive, allowing no obstacle 
to brook him in his path to success if it can be 
overcome by determined purpose and honorable 
effort. 

On the 9th of January, 1SS9, was celebrated the 
marriage of Oscar >r. Lyle and Mis-s Uluvia V. 
Phillips, who was born in Xeponset, August 15, 
1867, a daughter of John II. and Sarah E. (Aus- 
man) Phillips. Her parents were married Octo- 
ber 13, 1S6G. Her father was born in Redwood, 
Jefferson county, Xew York, November 16, 1846, 
and was educated in the public schools. Her 
mother was born in Clermont county, Ohio, Sep- 
tember 17, 1846. , In their family were three 
daughters: ^Irs. Lvle; Carrie L.. bom August 29, 
1871 ; and EtTie June, born June l?, 1379.'' 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Lyle were born eight chil- 
dren, but they have lost four. Those stil! living 
are: Wenona"P., born Mav 12, 1899; Eoscoe M., 
August 14, ISOl; Floy M., February 23, 1894; 
and Stephen II., January lo, 1902. The parents 
are prominent socially, having the warm regard 
of a large circle of friends, while the hospitality 
of many of the best homes of this section of the 
county is cordially extended them. ^Ir. Lyle is a 
school director and believes in providing excellent 
educational privileges, for he regards the system 
of our public schools as one of the bulwarks of the 
nation. He votes with the republican party and 
fratornallv is connected with the ^^ode^n Wood- 



It 



PAST A\i) rj;i:sEXT or j:ui;kau colwj'v 



men of AiiKTica. As a liii~iiics= iiiau he is aler 
enterprising' aiul pro^'ii .-sive, and these qua!iti( 
are the subotantial ami salient features of h 
success. 



JESSIE riEltCE GAi;\VOOD, .M. D. 

Although it is only in comparatively recent 
years that woman has entered the field of medi- 
cal practice she has deinoustratod her right to be 
ranked with the ablest iiiembors of the profes- 
sion, and among those who are success fully en- 
gaged in tlie practice of medicine and surgery in 
Princeton is ]^r. Jessie Pierce Garwood, who for 
thirteen years has been thus engaged in this city. 
She was born in Bureau county, a daughter of 
James A. Pierce, a native of New York, who 
came to this county when a young man. His 
father had taken up land from the government 
and Dr. Garwood's brother still owns the prop- 
erty. The death of i^Ir. Pierce occurred in the 
year 1SD2, while his wife survived until 1905. 
In their family were eleven children, six sons and 
five daughters, all of whom are yet living — a re- 
markable family record. 

Dr. Garwood spent her girlhood days in her 
parents" home and after acquiring a good educa- 
tion in the public schools determined upon the 
practice of medicine as a life work and entered 
the Iowa Medical College at Iowa City, from 
which she was graduated in the class of ISSS. 
Although she is a general practitioner she to a 
large extent makes a specialty of diseases of 
women and cliildren. She makes occasional con- 
tributions to medical journals and is a member 
of the county and state medical societies and of 
the North Central Illinois Medical Association. 
She now has a good practice whicli is constantly 
increasing and numbers among her patrons many 
of the best families of the city. 

In 1893 Jessie Pierce gave her hand in nuir- 
riage to Louis A. Garwood, who was born in 
Princeton and is a son of William Garv.'ood, one 
of the old settlers of P>ureau county. The father 
died in 190.j but the mother is still living at tlie 
age of seventy years and resides upon the old 
homestead which her father, Abel Hunt, entered 
from the government. At the time of tlie Civil 
war AYilliam Garwood enlisted for service in the 
army as a member of Company C, Ninety-third 
Kegirnent of Illinois Volunteers, with which he 
remained for three years. He held the rank of 
first lieutenant and was injured in a railroad 
wreck and also sustained two gun-shot wounds. 
In the family were two children: Louis A. and 
Ida, the latter the wife of William Welsh, a resi- 
dent of Minnesota. 

Louis A. Garwood was clurated in Princeton 
and engaged in farming until about ISOO. He 
devoted the succeeding year to the machinist's 
business and for ten years conducted a nursery, 



but for tlie past four years has been engaged in 
the sale of pianos, having a store in Princeton 
wherein he lumdles the Kimball pianos, his sales 
being among the largest of any house of the kind 
in the county. Mr. Garwood is a republican and 
in 190G was elected alderman of the third ward 
of Princeton. He is likewise a member of Tono- 
luka lodge. No. 89, I. 0. 0. F. lioih. Mr. and Dr. 
Garwood are members of the Congregational 
church and they are pleasantly located in an at- 
tractive home at No. 130 North Main street in 
Princeton. Mr. Garwood possesses a fine voice 
and for years was leader of the choir of the Meth- 
odist Protestant church. He has also been a great 
campaign singer, having sung in almost every 
county in the state during the time when political 
rallies have been held. Potli he and his wife are 
highly esteemed socially and their circle of friends 
in Princeton is an extensive one. 



JOHN A. McGANN. 

All jjarts of the country have sent their repre- 
sentatives to Bureau county to become factors in 
its citizenship, and among those New England 
has contributed is numbered Jolia A. McGann, 
who was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on the 
■1th of June, 1851, and became a resident of Illi- 
nois in 1S5G. His parents, Arthur and Bridget 
(O'Hare) McGann, -tvere natives of Ireland and, 
crossing the Atlantic to the new v.orld in 1350, 
settled in Massachusetts. They Ijecamc parents 
of two sons and a daughter, of vrhom Owen Mc- 
Gann was born in 1853. The dii-.ghtfr died in 
infancy. 

John A. ilcGann was but two years oM when 
brought by his mother from ^lassachusetts to 
Bureau county, Illinois, and was therefon^ reared 
in this locality. Lessons of industry and economy 
were early impressed upon his n.ind and have 
borne rich fruit in later years. His early life 
was a period of earnest toil and he has always 
been an energetic, enterprising n:an, dependent 
upon his own resources for all that he has achieved 
and enjoyed. He nov,- has charg.j of three hun- 
dred and twenty acres of land in Ohio township 
and is engaged extensively in the raising of grain 
and stock. "For eight years he has lived upon this 
farm and both branches of his business are prov- 
ing profitable, returning to him a gratifying an- 
nual income. His methods are enrirely practical 
and his success may bo rightly a::ributed to his 
indefatigable industry. He now owns a house 
and lot in the village of Ohio a-.d his savings 
would permit of his investn.ent in a farm of his 
own. 

It was on the .?5th of November, 1S90, that 
Mr. McGann was united in marriage to Miss !Mar- 
garet Enright, who was born in Bureau county, 
February IS, ISGl. Her parents were Daniel 
and Brid^'et (Doran) Enright, natives of Ireland, 



PAST AM) p];hsi;x'J' of 1!L'i;eau county. 



whence they came to the United States in ]\Iay, 
is:).'!. Jlrs. McGann is the eldest of their family 
of twelve children and by her maniagc she has 
become the mother of six children, as follows: 
Bridget Ethel, horn January 21, 18!>2; Arthur 
C, born September 20, 18l)-i; Mary, July 21, 
1S9G; Bcrnadctta, A^igust 19, ISliO ; I'atrick Leo, 
April 17, 1003; and Margaret Anuetta, June 9, 
1005. 

The family are conunuuieants of the Koman 
Catholic church and Mr. ]\IcGana is a member of 
Father Mathew's total abstinence society and is 
also identified with Modern Woodmen camp. No. 
17. His political endorsement is given the re- 
publican party and while he never seeks nor 
desires oflice as -a. reward for party fealty he is 
always cjuiek to respond to any demand for public 
service or for co-operation in movements for the 
general good. His residence in the county covers 
a period of a half century and he is therefore 
largely familiar with its history, as he has been 
a witness of its development from an early day 
and has seen the introduction of those lines of 
business activity which have led to its substantial 
improvemeiil. 



EDWAr.I) SCOTT. 

Edward Scott, who owns and occupies a farm 
in Berlin township, comprising eighty acres of 
land which is very productive and highly culti- 
vated, dates his residence in Bureau county from 
April, lS-3o, and has therefoi'e been identified with 
its interests for more than a half century, during 
whieh time he has witnessed much of its growth 
and development as pioneer conditions have given 
place to the evidences of a modern civilization. 
He was born in Hackettstown, Xew Jersey, Au- 
gust 26, 1853, and is one of a family of nine 
children, whose parents were Henry and Nancy 
(Grueuclyke) Scott, both of whom were natives 
of Warren county, New Jersey, the former born 
in 1820 and the latter in 1827' In the year 1855 
they left the east and came with their family to 
Illinois, settling in Bureau county in April of 
that year. Their children were: Johanna W., 
John, Sarah C. and George, all no\v deeeasfd; 
Woodluill, who died in Tennessee while in the 
army; Edward; Isaac; William Elmer; and 
Charles A. The father has now departed this 
life, his deatli having occurred July 3, 1808, when 
lie had reached the venerable age of seventy-eight 
years. His widow still survives. 

Edward Scott pursued his edrtcation in the 
schools of Bureau county, which ho ent'^red at the 
usual ago of six years, mastering therein the com- 
mon branches of English learning. lie has fol- 
lowed fanning all his days, for at an early age 
he began assisting his father upon the home farm 
and has since given his time and pnergies to*gen- 
eral agricultural pursuits. Twenty years ago he 



purehused his present farm for sixty-five dollars 
per acre. It comprises eighty acres of \alualde 
land, responding readily to the care and labor 
bestowed upon it, so that golden harvests are 
annually gathered. It is today worth one hun- 
dred and seventy-five dollars per acre and upon 
the jilace ilr. Scott has made many modern im- 
jiro\emeuts, so that he now has an excellent prop- 
er! v. He raises Norman horses and Poland-China 
hogs in addition to tilling the fields and his busi- 
ness alTairs are eapalil}' and suecessfully eon- 
ducted. 

As a companion and helpmate for life's jour- 
ney Mr. Scott chose iliss Mary E. Wolfe rsberger, 
to whom he was married December 31, 1874. She 
was born September 7, 1852, on the farm which is 
still their home. Her father, Charles Wolfers- 
berger, was a native of Pennsylvania, born July 
13, 1827, and his wife, who bore the maiden name 
of Susanna Pahnenstock, was likewise born in 
Pennsylvania, February 17, 1830. In their family 
were nine children, of whom two are deceased. 
The others are: John F., Hilary E'., Ida A., Sarah 
Matilda, Charles E., George S. aud ilaud S. Unto 
Mr. anci Mrs. Scott have been born two children: 
Elsie May, who was born December 12, 1875; and 
Nancy Lulu, born May 12, 1879. They have been 
given liberal educational privileges, having been 
students in Valparaiso Normal School. 

Mr. Scott holds a membership in Dauntless 
lodge, No. 150, Iv. P., which he .ioincd on its or- 
ganization. For twenty years he has been a school 
director and the cause of education finds in him a 
stalwart champion, who does all in his power to 
uphold the standard of public instruction. His 
political allegiance has always been given to the 
republican parly and he was roared in the faith 
of the Methodist church, to wdiich the family all 
belong. He stands for progress and improvement 
in material, intellectual and moral lines and wher- 
ever there is a movement for civic virtue or for 
opposition to misrule in ])ublic affairs he is found 
working in support of such and during the long 
years of his residence in Bureau county has been 
numbered among its valued citizens. 



JOHX BUTLKR PIT'J'MAN. 
John Butlc-r Pitiman, who er.rries on general 
agricultural pursuits on sections 14 and 23, ^fan- 
lius township, where he owns one hundred acres 
of land, was born in this township, September 10, 
1861, his parents being Henry S. and Sarah 
(Sa\er3) Pittman, who were farming people. The 
fatlier came to Illinois about 185 f and was here 
married. He gave nis attention to general agri- 
cultural pursuits ami continued actively in farm- 
in? nntil his death, which occurred on the 11th 
of'^March, 1902. He had for a year and a half 
survived his wife, who died on the 17th of Oc- 
tober, 1900. 



71G 



PAST AXD PJiJ'SKX'J' OF lil'iniAl' COL'X'I'V 



John B. Piltinnn is indebted to the puljHc- 
scliodl sj-stein of the county for the educatioual 
privileges lie enjoyed in his youth. He pursued 
his studies in a little country schoolhousc two 
miles north of ilanlius and hi"s devoted his entire 
life to farming, having been reared to that oc- 
cupation, lie early became familiar with tlie 
duties and labors of the agriculturist and as he 
worked at plowing, planting and harvesting he 
became familiar with the best methods of cultivat- 
ing the fields, so that he brought to his work 
broad practical experience when he started out in 
life on his own account. At an early age he began 
ojicrating rented land and in ISSS, when his 
labors had brought him s\ifficient capital, he 
bought his first farm, it being his present home. 
It comprises one hundred acres ot land on sections 
14 and 2.3, ^Manlius township, and is now a well 
cultivated and well improved property, being 
equipped with the latest improved machinery aad 
many facilities for carrying on tlie farm work. In 
connection with farming he is engaged in buying 
cattle. 

On the 12th of February. ISOO, Mr. Pittnian 
married iliss Pauline Schultz, of Bureau tov.-n- 
ship, who was born in Germany and is a daughter 
of Frederick A. Schultz. Tliey now have three 
children: Ernest, born Noveinber 10, 1891; Wal- 
ter, June 4, 1893; and Arvilla Emerly, April 11, 
1897. The family are members of the English 
Lutheran church and 'Sh. Pittman is independent 
in his political views. At the present writing he 
is serving as one of the councilmen of Manlius 
and he has also been school director. Fraternally 
he is connected with the Odd Fellows lodge at 
New Bedford. A casual glance at his life history 
seems to indicate that he has always lived a quiet 
and uneventful career and yet investigation into 
his record will bring forth the fact that his has 
been an honorable manhood and at all times he 
has been faithful and loyal in his duties of citizen- 
ship. 



DAVIS H. VAN ORMEP. 
Davis II. Van Ormer, one of the well known 
and representative agriculturists of Jlanlius town- 
ship, has found in his business career ample op- 
portunity for the exercise of his latent energies, 
and through his well directed labor has gained a 
place among the successful farmers of the commu- 
nity. A native of Pennsylvania, he was born in 
Juniata county on the 24th of September, 1S53, 
and is a son of William and Sarah_ (Shellenbarg- 
er) Van Ormer, who were likewise natives of that 
county, where the father followed farming for a 
number of years. About 18-58 he came to Illinois, 
but while en route tarried for a time in Miami 
county, Ohio, where he aided in the erection of a 
barn and remained for about sixteen months. In 
1859 he arrived with his family in Bureau county, 



Illinois, having iu the meantime purchased the 
farm upon which his son ])avis II. nov.- resides. It 
was then all wild prairie land, which ho at once 
began to develop and improve until his farm labor 
had transformed it into rich fields. To some ex- 
tent he likewise followed the carpenter's trade, and 
thus he lived a life of activity and enterprise. Fie 
continued to make his home in this county until 
March, 1889, when he was called to his final rest. 
His wife had died a number of years before, pass- 
ing away in ISCG. In their family were six chil- 
dren: Elizabeth, now the wife of John Spiclman, 
living in C'oll'ey county, Kansas; John, a resi- 
dent farmer of Greenfield, Adair county, Iowa; 
Jlalissa, the deceased wife of Samuel Kisku'lon; 
David H. ; Lueien, who died when about nineteen 
years of ago, and Oliver M., who is married and 
lives upon a farm in South Dakota. After losing 
his first wife William Van Ormer was again 'mar- 
ried, and by that union there was one daughter, 
Angie ^L, now residing in Plymouth county, Iowa. 

The father was one of the prominent and influ- 
ential republicans of Manlius township, where he 
filled nearly all the local offices, including those 
of supervisor and justice of the peace. He acted in 
the latter capacity for about twenty years, and his 
decisions were strictly fair and impartial. He was 
an active and faithful member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, in which he served as class- 
leader for several years, and in all the various re- 
lations of life his straightforward, honorable 
course won him friendsliip and regard. 

Davis H. Van Ormer was a youth of five sum- 
mers when his parents left the Keystone state, and 
he had reached the ago of six years ere the journey 
was completed to Illinois. The father then in- 
vested in eighty acres of land, to which additions 
have been made until the farm now comprises one 
hundred and sixty acres, and it is upon the old 
family homestead that tlie subject of this review 
yet resides. In the conmion schools he pursued 
his education, mastering the branches of learning 
usually taught in such institutions. When he was 
twenty-three years of ago he and his brother John 
renfeii the old homestead, which they operated to- 
gether for four years, and on the expiration of 
that period Davis H. Van Ormer purchased the 
interest John had in the eighty-acre tract. After 
the father's death and when the estate was settled 
he bought the interest of the other heirs in the 
other eighty-acre tract, so that he is now the owner 
of a fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres, 
which he has placed under a high state of cultiva- 
tion. He has added many modern accessories and 
equipments, and uses the latest improved macliin- 
ery to facilitate the work of the fields. Everything 
about his farm is carefully done, and he now has 
valuable propoity which is largely a monument to 
the enterprise, thrift and business activity of the 
owner. 

On the 6th of Februar}-, 1881, Mr. Van Ormer 
was married to Miss Em.ma Carney, who was then 



PAST AND rilESllXT OF HUKHAU COL-NTV. 



residing in F.urmu tdwii-liip. Her birth, liuwrvcr, 
occurred in Putnam wuiity, Illinois, and lior par- 
ents were John and Angt'liin.- (Farncy) Carii'^v. 
Unto Mr. and ;Mr.«. Van Ormor have bwii i)orii 
five children: Lcoiui ifay, born January 5, 1882; 
Orpha Angelinc, Augusl'lO. 1887 ; Erville Davis, 
Julv 24, 1889; Percy IMcKinloy, April 10, 1894, 
and" Lloyd Freedom, April 26, 1S!)G. 

ifr. Van Ormer lias several times been called to 
public ofllce by his fellow-townsmen, who rceog- 
ni:?chis worth and ability. For twenty-five years lie 
has served as school director, and after the build- 
ing of the new school house of ilanlius he resigned. 
He has likewise been road commissioner and 
assessor, while for twelve years he served as jus- 
tice of the pcace^ making a record equally credit- 
able with that of his father through the control 
and faitliful discharge of his duties and his un- 
biased opinions, which were ever based upon the 
equity and the law in the case. Hi? political alle- 
giance has ever been given to the republican party, 
which he has stanchly supported since ago con- 
ferred upon him the right of franchise, and he cast 
his first presidential vote for Hayes in 1876. He 
has not been a politician in the sense of office seek- 
ing, and it is only when urged to accept ofllce by 
his fellow-townsmen that he has consented to do so. 
He and his wife are earnest religious \>orkers, l)ut 
are not connected with any denomination. They 
have always stood for right, for progress, improve- 
ment anil reform, and their influence is a potent 
element along lines which work for the welfare of 
the comnnmitv. 



JOHX M. TELLKAMP. 

John M. Tellkamp is an enterprising business 
man of La iloille, connected with its industrial 
and commercial interests. He belongs to that 
class of representative American men who while 
promoting individual snecess also contribute to 
the general prosperity and thus he has become a 
valued and representative resident of his native 
village. He was born October 1(3, 1SG3, and is one 
of the ten children of Martin and Katheriue (Eg- 
gers) Tellkamp, who were natives of Germany 
and on coming to this countrv in 18.58 settled in 
La :Moille, Hlinois. Thoy hail four sons and six 
-.'dughters. of whom John M. was the fourth in 
order of birth. 

John JI. Tellkam[) was educated in the public 
schools of La iloille township and when he put 
aside his text-books he took up the trade of his 
father and beearne a proficient painter. He has 
since followed that occupation, having a libor.ii 
share of the public patronage in this line. .-\s the 
years have gone by and his trade has increaseil. 
bringing him a good financial return, he has in- 
vested in town property and is the owner of three 
houses and lots in La iloiUe. He is also conduct- 
ing a prosperous business as proprietor of a res- 



taurant and i.- thii.s will kn.v.vn in trade circles in 
his native town. 

In LssiJ Mr. Telll:amp was inarrird to Miss 
Carrie l)ruiiiiner, who was born in JJull'alo, New 
Y.nk, .lanuary 25, 1S68. Her parents were An- 
drew ami Elizabeth (Cook) Drummer. The 
father, wliu was born in Germany, came to Amer- 
ica and located at BulTalo, Xew York, fifty-si.x; 
years ago. He was there married to Miss Eliza- 
beth Cook, a native of that city, and on leaving the 
Empire state they took up' their abode in La 
Jloille about thirty-seveu years ago. In their 
family were ten children, Mrs. Tellkamp being the 
fifth in order of birth. By her marriage she has 
become the mother of two sons : Fay A., born Oc- 
tober 22, 1893; and Harvey G., born March 9, 
1897. Mr. Tellkamp is a member of the German 
Lutheran church, while his wife and children are 
communicants of the Catholic church. He is also 
identified with the ilasonie fraternity and the 
Modern Woodmen of America. He votes with the 
republican party and has held the office of coun- 
cilman of La Moille. 

From an early age he has made his own way in 
the world and -his possessions are the visible evi- 
dence of a life of industry and thrift supple- 
mented by unquestioned business integrity and 
keen discrimination. He has the patronage of 
tlie public and the esteem of his fellow citizens 
and the family is a prominent one in the commu- 
nity. He is likewise recognized as a leader iu 
local repulilicaii ranks and was a delegate to the 
county convention which nominated J. W. Tem- 
pleton for state senator. To his children he has 
given excellent educational privileges, sparing no 
expense in this direction and, leaving the kinder- 
garten at the age of six years, Harvey is now at 
the age of nine years in the fourth grade, and 
Fay in the seventh grade. Tliey are also being 
instructed in music and ilr. Tellkamp is resolved 
that they shall have excellent educational privi- 
leges. Both he and his wife are widely known in 
La Moille, where the circle of their friends is 
almost co-extensive with the circle of their ac- 
quaintances. 



WH.LIAM H. IIAIXES. 

William H. Hain- ;. who-o farm of eighty acres 
in Ohio township is the visilile proof of his life of 
activity and energy, for he started out upon his 
business career empty handed, was born in this 
county, September 24, 1SG6. There were five 
children, of whom he was the third, in the family 
of his parents, Andrew J. and Julia A. (Williams) 
Haines. The father was born in Ifaine and mother 
in Pennsylvania and both are now deceased. They 
became residents of Bureau county in the '50s and 
continued to reside here until called to their final 
rest. The father was twice married and bv the 



1•A^ 



J'l; 



;.\'j' OF w 



AT 



seioiid unimi h;iJ oiir dauglitor, who ha? now 
passed- away. 

Kcared as a farmer hciy, \\'illiaiii II. Ilaincs 
pursued his ediitatiuii in the district schools and 
in Fulton high school, and when not occupied with 
his te.\t-books Ins time was largely demanded in 
farm work and he gained practical e.xperience in 
all tlie tasks relating to the cultivation and devel- 
opment of the fields, so that he brought practical 
e.xperience to his work wlion he took up farming 
on his own account. lie received some assistance 
from his father and has practically depended upon 
his own resources for all that he has achieved, and 
he has added to his properly until he now owns 
eighty acres of very ricli land, worth from one 
hundred and fifty to two hundred dollars per acre. 
Tbei-e are good buildings upon the place and his 
home is conveniently and pleasantly located near 
the village of Ohio in one of the best fanning 
sections of the state. Abundant crops are annu- 
ally gatliered and his business is now capably and 
successfully conducted. 

On Christmas day of 1S9D was celebrated llie 
marriage of William H. Haines and Jliss Erva 
Staples, who was born in Bureau county. They 
have a pleasant home and are widely and favorably 
known in this part of the county. Mr. Haines 
votes the republican ticket but has never been 
active in search of public office, preferring to give 
his undivided attention to his business affairs, in 
which he is now meeting with signal success. He 
holds no mistaken ideas regarding tlic ease with 
which one may win success but realizes that en- 
ergy and perseverance are essential factors in gain- 
ing prosperity. 



JACOB CHi;iTZ-MAX. 

On the pages of pioneer history of Bureau 
county the names of Chritzman, Kno.\ and Mer- 
cer figure conspicuously and honorably, and Jacob 
Chritzman, whose name introduces this review, 
is classed among those who bore an important 
and active part in the business development of 
Princeton from an early day. He became a resi- 
dent of the city in 1855 and for many years con- 
ducted an implement store tlicre. His birth oc- 
curred in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, Xovembcr 7, 
1833. His parents were Henry and ]\rargaret 
(Zigler) Chritzrnan, both of whom were natives 
of Pennsylvania. The father's birth occurred in 
the beautiful district near Gettysburg, and he 
made his home in Pennsylvania throughout his 
entire life. His wife also parsed awav tliop\ In 
their family were sis children but only one is 
now living, Dr. Harry Chritzman, who is a prac- 
ticing physician residing at "Welshrun, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

In the schools of his native town Jacob Chritz- 
man acquired his education. His fath.T died 
when he was a boy and after attending school for 



a lew years he went tu Lancaster, rcun.Sj Ivania, 
where he began to learn the trade of a moulder. 
He was employed there in a foundry for a few 
years and afterward removed to Bcrrysburg, Penn- 
sylvania, where lie was also employed in a foun- 
dry until 1853. That year witnessed his removal 
to the middle west. He first settled in ilinnesota, 
whore he took up land claims, remaining in that 
stale for a short time. He next came to Illinois, 
settling in Carroll county, where he worked at 
his trade until 1855, when he came to Princeton. 
Here he purchased an acre of laud near the dejiot 
and erected thereon a small building, after which 
he began foundry work on his own account. He 
soon removed his plant to Main street owing to 
the increase of his trade and there he began deal- 
ing in implements and wagons, manufacturing his 
own goods. He thus conducted a good retail as 
well as manufacturing business for many years r.iid 
was one of the leading and representative mer- 
chants of the city. His patronage steadily in- 
creased and his business had grown to such pro- 
portions that in 1S78 he felt justified in extending 
the scope of his activities, by adding a complete 
stock of plows, reapers, mo\\'ers, threshers, engines, 
cultivators, buggies, wagons, etc., and for a num- 
ber of years he controlled the most extensive busi- 
ness of the kind in Bureau county, continuing 
therein until his death. 

On the 10th of January, 1S59, Mr. Chritzman 
was married to Miss Kachel Jane Knox, a native 
of Bureau county and a daughter of AMlliam and 
Marv (Mercer) Knox, botli of whom were natives 
of Ohio. The father was born March 31, 1814, 
and was a son of Joseph Knox, who came from 
the Buckeye state to Bureau county in 1833, the 
year of the Black Hawk war. He was one of its 
first settlers and established his home upon a farm 
in Princeton township, which he developed from 
the wild prairie. Aaron fiercer, grandfather of 
^trs. Chritzman, built a log cabin just west of 
Princeton on what is now the Wagner farm. He 
engaged in general agricultural pursuits there 
and occupied his cabin home until his death. He 
was a man of industry and enterprise and pros- 
pered in his undertakings. William Knox, father 
of Mrs. Chritzman, engaged in farming in Prince- 
ton township the greater part of his life but in 
his later days removed to the city of Princeton, 
where he lived retired for seventeen years or until 
his death, which occurred on the ITth of October, 
1898. His wife also passed away in Princeton and 
both were eighty-four years of age at the time of 
their demise. All of tlieir children, eight in num- 
ber, are yet living, namely: Mrs. Chritzman, 
Aaron, Sarah, Oscar, Albert, ilary, Malvina and 
Xan. 

ilr. and Mrs. Chritzman became the parents of 
six children: Albert is now deceased; Lottie is 
the wife of Thoina< Marks, a resident of Rushvillc. 
Illinois, where he is station agent for the Chicago, 
Burlington & Quincy Eailrond Company, end they 






JACOB CinnTZMAX. 



PAST A\i) pj;ks];xt of ]'.ui;j;au coiwrv 



m 



have two cliiklrvn, Katluyn ^larie, tiorn Juue o, 
i:i01, and Clinbrd C, bom February 25, 1903; 
Fannie died at the age of five years; Clarence mar- 
ried Nellie Pitman and resides in I'rineeton, 
where he is engaged in the laundry business; Mer- 
cer and ^lario IF, are both deceased. Tiie 
death of the father occurred October 16, 1SS9. 

For several years Jlr. Chritzman served as 
school director and held several local offices, in 
which ho was ever found to be a competent and 
faithful official His political allegiance was given 
to the democracy and he belonged to the ^lasonie 
lodge and the Knight Templar Conimandery of 
Princeton. In his business affairs he prospered, 
becoming well-to-do. Honest and upright in all 
life's relations, liis name was a synonym for busi- 
ness integrity and activity. There were no sensa- 
tional chapters in his life history. On the contrary 
his record was characterized by a steady persever- 
ance- resulting in successful accomplislimcnt of 
whatever he undertook. He always seemed to real- 
ize and fully meet his obligations of citizenship 
and of business and private life and when he was 
called from the scene of earthly activities his 
death was the occasion of deep regret to all who 
knew him, for he was respected and honored wher- 
ever known. He died at the family home at No. 
251 La Salle street. This is a beautiful residence 
yet occupied by llrs. Chritzman, who is a member 
of the Methodist Ejiiscopal church and a lady 
whose many good traits of character have won her 
a large circle of friends. 



GEOKGE W. RE^iISBUPG. 

George W. Remsburg, a progressive farmer of 
Ohio township, where he owns an interest in a 
valuable tract of land of one hundred and sixty 
acres, is a native of Sandusky county, Ohio, his 
natal day being June G, ISoO. His parents are 
Solomon and ifargaret (Shawl) Eemsburg, the 
former born in Frederick county, Jlaryland, and 
the latter in Sandusky county, Ohio. The father 
was first married in JIaryland to Jliss itary A. 
ilichael, who was born in that state January 30, 
1S21. They then removed to Fremont, Ohio, where 
the wife's death occurred November 28, IS-IG. She 
•^ad become the mother of two sons, Isaiah and 
Carlefon. For his second wife the father chose 
^fiss ilargarct Shawl, to whom he was married 
November 2, 1847, and unto them were born two 
children, of whom our subject is the younger. The 
parents remained residents of the state of Olr 
until the year IS.jT. when they removed westward 
to Illinois, settling in Bureau countv. Here the 
father's death occurred "Mny 27, 1S9S, but the 
mother still survives. 

George W. Item.sburg was onlv seven vears of 
age when lie accompanied his parents on their re- 
moval from Ohio to P.ureau county, Illinois. Fie 
received a common-school education, which was 



later suppl.-nicntcd by a course in 'Whealon college, 
at Wheaton, Illinois. After putting aside his text- 
books he engaged in farming and stock-raising in 
Ohio township, and this occupation has continued 
to be his life work. As the years have gone by he 
has jirospcred in his undertakings, each year add- 
ing to his financial resources, until today he owns 
a quarter interest in an estate of one hundred and 
si.xty acres of fine farm land, worth from one hun- 
dred and fifty to two hundred dollars per acre. He 
is operating tliis tract of land, on which he raises 
the cereals best adapted to soil and climate, and 
he is also engaged in the raising of stock, both 
branches of his business bringing him a gratifying 
income. 

Our subject has been twice married, his first 
union being with ]Miss ^largaret E. Hops, the wed- 
ding ceremony being performed on the 3d of 
July, 1872. She was born in March, 1852, and 
her death occurred in January, 1880. They had 
become the parents of two children: Maury B., 
born August 25, 1873, and Virgil C, born De- 
cendjer 4, 1877. Jlr. I'emsburg's second union was 
with iliss Aurelia Morse, a relative of Sam- 
uel F. B. Morse, the discoverer of telegraphy. She 
was born in Princeton, Illinois, August 20, 1858, 
and on the 24th of November, 1887, gave her hand 
in marriage to George W. Remsburg. Jlrs. I'ems- 
burg was educated in the schools of Princeton, 
passing through consecutive grades until she had 
completed the high-school course. She then en- 
gaged in teaching in Bureau county for ten years 
prior to her marriage. 

In politics Mr. Eemsburg is a republican and 
takes an active interest in political affairs. Ho is 
popular with his fellow-townsmen, having been 
called to a number of township offices. For three 
term? he filled the office of assessor, and for tlie 
past throe years has filled the office of township 
treasurer, beiiig the present incumbent. He has 
also served on the township republican committee, 
and for ten years was a member of the county cen- 
tral committee, filling these different positions in a 
creditable manner. Fraternally he is connected 
with the ilasons, belonging to Bureau lodge. No. 
112, and he is also a member of the chapter, coun- 
cil and comma ndery at Princeton. Fie belongs to 
the ^lodern Woodiuen camp, No. 17, and to the 
Knights of the Globe, while he and his wife are 
members of the Eastern Star. In his religious 
views he is liberal, being identified with no denom- 
ination. 

Having spent almost his entire life in Bureau 
county, Mr. Eem.sburg has been an active worker 
in its devcl.^pment and progress. FIc has labored 
earnestly and persistently, and, while adding to 
his individual prosperity, has done effective work 
for his township and county. He is leading an 
active and busy life, and, while operating a large 
tract of land, which claims much of his time and 
attention, he yet finds time for public affairs. Tie 
owns a beautiful countrv homo, and he and his 



PAS'J' A.\|) riiKSKN'J- OF lUIJI-iAl CorXTV 



wife enjoy to tlic fullest extent tlic plea.-,ure.-, of 
life and arc popular and influential people of 
Bureau county. 



IIKXKY LAWJIKXCE FOSTF;!:. 

When the tocsin of war sounded men from all 
walks of life flocked to tlie standard of the Union. 
They came from the work shops, the counting 
houses, the offices and the fields, all actuated by 
the common purpose of sustainitig the supremacy 
of the national government. Among the number 
of loyal sons furnished by Bureau county was 
Henry Lawrence Foster, who made a creditable 
military record and who in days of peace has mani- 
fested an equal spirit of patriotism, lie is now 
actively and successfully engaged in farming in 
Concord and has been a life-long resident of this 
locality. He was born September 2G, 183S, upon 
the farm belonging to his father, Franklin Foster, 
who came from his native country, England, to 
America at an early age. He resided for a time 
at Boston, Massachusetts, and in the spring of 
1S3S came with his wife, Mrs. Harriet Foster, to 
Bureau county, Hlinois, settling at French Grove, 
where he began farming, an occupation which he 
followed continuously and sucecbsfully until his 
death. He passed away May "22, ISSO, having 
long survived his wife, who died on the ISth of 
August, 1857. 

In the schools of Buda Henry Ij. Foster ac- 
quired his education and during the periods of 
vacation he worked on the home farm, continuing 
to assist his father in its development from the 
time his education was completed until the 1st of 
December, ISCl, when he responded to the coun- 
try's call for troops, enlisting as a private of Com- 
pany E, Thirty-third Hlinois Volunteer Infantry, 
under Captain Elliott, of Princeton. He contin- 
ued with that command during all of the battles 
and skirmishes in which it participated. He was 
first in tlie Missouri campaign witli the western 
branch of the army and in March, 1SG3, moved 
down the Mississippi river to Milligan's Bend, par- 
ticipated in the battle and siege of Vicksburg, Mis- 
sissippi, where he was under fire for forty days, 
taking part in tlie charge on the forts May 23, 
18G3. The Union troops then drove General John- 
son back to Jackson, ]\Iissis5ippi, and Company E, 
to which ilr. Foster belonged, lost thirty-four men 
during that engagement. The regiment afterward 
proceeded to New Orleans and assisted in the re- 
capture of that city and of the railroad. They 
held the road until Xovember, when they were 
sent to tlie border of Mexico, where trouble was 
threatened, going by boat to the Rio Grande river. 
They could not land, however, on account of bad 
weather, so they laid siege to Fort Espcranza, 
which they captured, continuing in that locality 
until January, ISfll. Hi.- term of enlistment hav- 
ing then expired, Mr. Fo.<ter returni'd home on a 



furlougli of thirty days, after ha\ ing re-enliited 
as a vrteran to sc'rve until the close of the war. 
He again joined the department of the north and 
took part in the IJed River campaign. The Thirty- 
third Illinois afterward proceeded to Mobile, Ala- 
bama, vihere they assisted in capturing and de- 
molishing Spanish Fort in April, 18(i5. They 
then marched to Montgomery, Alabama, where 
they received the news of President Lincoln's as- 
sassination. From that point they made their 
way back to Vicksburg, Mississippi, and over into 
Arkansas, where they p)articipatod in more skir- 
mishes and battles, taking part in the engage- 
ments at DuvalFs BlulT, Bayou Sasehe and Helena. 
During the march from Mobile to Montgomery, a 
distance of one hundred and eighty-six miles, they 
had no provisions only sueli as they could pick up 
in a devastated country, mucli of the time living 
on parched corn alone. 

Mr. Foster was mustered out at Vicksburg, Mis- 
sissippi, Xovember 24, 1865, after nearly four years 
of active service with the Union army, during 
which time he proved an intrepid soldier, whose 
valor was displayed on many a southern battle- 
field. AVheu the country no longer needed his aid 
he returned to Bureau county and purchased a 
farm of forty acres, since which time he has been 
devoted to general agricultural pursuits and as 
his financial resources have increased he has added 
to his property until he now has over two hun- 
dred and fifty acres, constituting an excellent and 
well improved farm. 

Mr. Foster had a brother. Edward Brooks Fos- 
ter, who served with the eastern army in the Civil 
war, entering at the three-months' call and after- 
ward re-enlisting for three years. He was born 
in IS to and joined the Union troops as a member 
of the Fortieth New York Pegimcnt of Infantry, 
of which he became a commissioned officer. He 
participated in the first and second battles of Bull 
Kuu, of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and many 
others of the most notable engagements of the war. 
He died in 1902 near Des Moines, Iowa, where he 
had lived from ISGS, having been one of the prom- 
inent and extensive farmers of that locality. 

On the 14th of October, 1SG6, Henry L. Foster 
was married to Miss Sarai C. Weston, of Buda, 
a daughter of Joseph Weston, a fanner who had 
come to Illinois from Maine in 1S5T. 5Irs. Foster 
died June 7, ISOT, leaving three children: Hattie 
W., who is a graduate of the lUida high school and 
is at home; Arthur Kendall, who was born in 
1ST2 and follovvS farming; and Albert Webb, born 
in 1874. The family have altogether over four 
hundred acres of land and are prominent repre- 
sentatives of tlic farming interests of this section 
of the state, ilr. Foster belongs to Emory post, 
No. 198, G. A. E., of which he is a past com- 
mander, and he takes an interest in its cnmp fires, 
recalling memories of the past and of the experi- 
ences upon the t'-nted fields. He is a valued and 
helpful member of the First Raptisi church of 



I'AST AXD ri;!;sK.\T 



i5Ci;i;Ar corx'i'v 



i5u<la, ill wluL-h iV.r years he has served as a dea- 
con. 'Iliis assoeiatioii is imlieative of liis eliaraeter 
and his principles, for his life has l)een well spent 
and honorable. 



IIKHBEnT T. LYLE. 

Herbert T. ]..yle, a resident fanner of Xeponset 
township, where he was born on the lllh of ilay, 
1859, represents one of the old families of the 
county, his parents being Stephen T). and Eliza 
W. (Ilateh) Lyle, of whom extended mention is 
made on another page of this work in connection 
with the sketch of Oscar il. I^yle. iSTo event of 
special iinportauce occurred to vary the routine of 
farm life for Herbert T. I^yle in his boyhood days. 
His time was divided between the duties of the 
schoolroom, the pleasures of the playground and the 
work of the home farm, and he remained with his 
parents until he had attained the age of twenty- 
two years, when he started out in life on his own 
account — following the occupation to which he 
had been reared. He at first farmed eighty acres 
of land, and at the present writing, in 190C, is 
cultivating about one hundred and sixty acres of 
the rich soil of Keponset township. In 1SS3 he 
erected the residence which he now occupies and 
his farm is a well improved property, equipped 
with good machinery for facilitating the work of 
the fields and supplied with many other modern 
conveniences and accessories. Mr. Lyle is well 
known as a breeder of cattle, horses, hogs and 
sheep, making a specialty of Xornian horses and 
Poland China hogs. He now has one hundred 
and thirty head of hogs upon his place and he 
made an exhibit this year of his stock at tlie Ke- 
waneo fair. 

Pleasantly situated in his home life. Mr. Lyle 
was married on the IGth of September, 1S80, to 
Miss Emma E. Rarry, who was born in Winchester. 
Scott county, Hlinois, October 9, IS-iS, a daugh.ter 
of John W. and Louisa E. (Blackburn) F)arry. 
Her father was born in Zane?ville. Ohio, January 
5, 183.3, and when a youth of nine years, accom- 
panied his parents on their removal to Illinois, 
the journev being made bv team to Knox county 
in 1842. There the father", wlio had taught school 
in Ohio, continued to engage in teaching in the 
winter seasons, while in the suiiimer months he 
followed farming. He was a great political 
speaker. In the spring of 1810, attracted by the 
discovery of gold on the Pacific slope, he went to 
California, where his death occurred, and in the 
succeeding fall, John W. Earry accompanied his 
uncle to Henry couutv, Illinois, after which he 
earned his livelihood for some time hy working 
by the dav or morrtli in Honrv and Bureau coun- 
ties. On" the 7th of February, IS-i-^, he wedded 
Louisa Blackbxirn, who wa- born in Yo'-k=hire. 
England, in IS.3.'^. and was brnii'jht by her parent^ 
to America in IStC. the family being p;!^senger- 



on a sailing vessel wliieh weighed anchor at Ijiver- 
pool and reached New Orleans after a voyage of 
<^'\^n weeks and two days. From the Crc°eent 
City they made their way up the Mi-sissippi 
river and for two years were residents of Winches- 
ter, Illinois, after which they located on what is 
known as the old Blackburn estate near Kewanee. 
It was in that neighborhood that Mrs. Barry began 
her education at the WeathersGeld school, 'follow- 
ing the cattle path across the prairie. In April 
subsequent to their marriage Jlr. and Mrs. Barry 
removed to Enox county, where he carried mail 
and passengers by stage on the Quincy route from 
Galesburg to Avon, while tlie Chicago, Burlington 
& Quincy Eailroad tracks were being laid. This 
route, in charge of \\'illiam Horace liolcomb, 
was twenty-two miles long, and he made the round 
trip every day in the week. As soon as the rail- 
road was in operation he returned to Henry coun- 
ty, where he resided until 1S71, when he removed 
to Aurora. For eight years he was engaged there 
in railroading and in the restaurant business, but 
on account of impaired health he resumed farming 
in Bureau county, where he devoted his attention 
to general agricultural pursuits until the spring 
of ISSS. when he took up his abode in the village 
of Neponset. there spending his remaining days. 
On the 7ih of February, 190-5, he and his estimable 
wife celebrated their golden v.-edding anniversary, 
which was a most enjoyable occasion to all present. 
Many substantial tolcens of regard were received 
from their guests, not the least interesting of which 
was a box of orange blossoms for tlie bride, sent 
by Mrs. Ira 0. Smith, a sister of Mr. Barry's, 
of Los Angeles, California. 'My. Barry often ex- 
pressed the wish that he might live to celebrate his 
fiftieth wedding anniversary, and this was vouch- 
safed to him, but he did not tarry long in life after- 
ward, dying suddenly at his home in the latter part 
of ^inreh. 190,'). He had long resided in this coun- 
tv and was an honored citizen. Young and old, 
rich and poor, were glad to claim his friendship 
and found him a most genial companion. He 
was a strong advocate of the cause of temperance 
and most earnest in his support of the prohibi- 
tion party. It is said that no man in Neponset 
had more friends than he. Mrs. Barry still sur- 
vives her husband and yet resides in Neponset. 
In their family were nine children, those yet liv- 
ing being: George, of Downer's Grove, Illinois; 
Jfrs. Laura Nevitt. of Chicago ; Walter, also of 
Downer's Grove: ^Tattic, the wife of Victor Stud- 
lev: Bessie, the wife of G. A. Eced ; Blanche, the 
wife of Wilbur Blake, of Neponset; Emma, the 
wife of H. T. Lvle. of Neponset. 

The Iiome of 'Nfr. and ^frs. Lvle hn? been 
blessed with two children : Edith L.". born Febru- 
arv IS. 1882. and Theron B., born October 11, 
IsO'i. Thf^ former is now the wife of William 
Knnpn and hn« three children. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lvle ha\e n wide and favorable acquaintance in 
Biue-r.i county, enjoying the hospitality of many 



f'AS'J' AM 



J'Kl 



:-\T OF j;ii; 



COL.X'J'V, 



of the best liomci. In politics he ii a republic;iu 
and has served as scliool director I'or six years, ad- 
vocatiDg the employment of good teachers 'and 
the upholding of a high standard of public educa- 
tion. He has also been assessor for four years and 
every public duty devolving upon him has been 
faithfully performed. Fraternallv he is con- 
nected with tlic Independent OrdJr of Odd Fel- 
lows, tlie Modern Woodmen of America and the 
Yeomen. With the exception of one vear he lias 
resided continuously in this county, where lie has 
a very wide acquaintance, and the fact that many 
of his stanchest friends are those who have known 
him from his boyhood days to the present is an in- 
dication that his has been an honorable 
riglit career. 



up- 



Kno.\ 
a son 
ge he 
, and 



lEWIX CAPPEEEUNE. 

Irwin Capperrune was born in Yates Citv, 
county, Illinois, December 31, 1845, and is 
of T. 11. Capperrune. ^Vhen four years of a 
was brought by his father to Bureau county 
for nearly fifty years the father continued a resi- 
dent of this part of the state, living at Bovd's 
Grove, in Milo township, where he was recognized 
as a most valuable citizen, worthy pioneer and up- 
right man. He was interested in the iatellectual 
and moral progress, as well as in the material de- 
velopment of the community, and ho gave the land 
upon which was built the Methodi'st Episcopal 
church at Boyd's Grove. His death occurred in 
188.5, when he had reached the age of seventv-five 
years. 

Irwin Capj.errune is one of a family of four 
children, three of whom are now living, an.! at- 
tended the district schools near his father's farm 
He then began business life as a farmer, follow- 
ing agricultural pursuits continuously until 1003, 
when with his family he came to Bradford. 

Mr. Capperrune married Miss Eva C. Bowman, 
a daughter of Jacob Bowman, an early settler of 
Bureau county. There have been three children 
of this marriage, two sons and a daughter. 



JA.MES JfcCPEKDY. 
On the list of Bureau county's hunored dead 
appears the name of James IfcCreedv who wa^ 
born jrarch 20. 1S50, and died October 1-5, 
1S94 He lived the life of an uprioht. active 
and honorable farmer, who was ever a^ chami.ion 
of all that pertained to general improvement and 
progress and who stood for all that is just, true 
and right in man's relations with his followmen. 
His parents were George and :\rargarot (Xelson) 
McCreedy, the latter a de.-^cemlant of F.ord 
."on of England. Both the fatlier and nm 
houpvrr. were born in Sentland. ];.'<■., mil, <■■ 



Xel- 



d.'m^ ol America, they established their home in 
I>elaware, where the birth of James McCreedy 
occurred, lie completed his education in the 
scliools of that state, and, removmir to Michi^ran 
settled at Greenville, where he conducted a °cn- 
eral store for a number of years. He also owned 
property m the town, having fortv acres within 
the corporation limits. In the vear 1S.5S ho came 
trom .Michigan to Bureau countv and made in- 
vestment m the present homestead, on which his 
widow is now living. It comprise; one hundred 
and si.xty acres of land on section IT, Westficld 
townsliip, and is a valuable farm property, 
equipped with modern conveniences and all the 
accessories that go to make up a model farm of 
the tu-entieth century. Sir. McCreedy displayed 
e.xccllent ability as a financier, togetlier with keen 
insight into business conditions and unfalterin-r 
energy in the execution of his plans. He ent^a"-ed 
m the raising of grain and stock, makin- a s^ic- 
cialty of shorthorn cattle. He paid about twelve 
dollars per acre for the first land which he pur- 
chased in Bureau county and which today is worth 
from one hundred and seventy-fiye to 'two hun- 
dred dollars per acre. His business interests were 
niost carefully conducted and wharever he under- 
took he carried forward to successful completion. 
:VIr. McCreedy was married to r^Iiss Elleu iic- 
Dowell m Chester countv, Pennsylvania, in 1860 
and bringing his bride to Illinois, settled upon 
what has since been known as the homestead 
farm. She was born in the Keystone state April 
11, 18-38, a daughter of Williau, and Marc^aret 
(.McCracken) McDowell, both of whom were 
natives of Chester county, Pennsvlvania. Unto 
^fr. and :Mrs. McCreedy were born' eight children, 
of whom four have passed awav, naiiidv: 'Martha' 
who died :\raivh 18. ISGl: Margaret," April u' 
18G.]; George, April 3-3, 1601; and Fred, Feb- 
ruary 1, ]80;;. Those still living are James El- 
ston. William J.ihn Eugene. Alberr J. and Ella 
V. Margaret. 

In his religious faith :\Ir. ^IcCreedy was a 
Presbyterian, and the family all h.-.ld member- 
ship in the church of that denominati.-.n at Arling- 
ton. He was also a Master Mason, his afriliatio°n 
being with Arlington lodge. His life was in har- 
mony with the beneficent principles of the craft 
and with his professions as a moinber of the 
church. He was never known to take advantage 
of the necessities of his followmen in anv business 
transaction, and although he attained a high meas- 
ure of success it was attributed entirely to his 
judicious investment, his careful nianaLrement and 
his marked business enterprise. AH who knew 
him re-peeted him and those who came within 
the closer circle of his friendship entertained for 
him the warmest per.s.mal regard. He was de- 
voted to his family, and it was one ^f the pleas- 
ures of his life that hi- surces-es enahled him to 
minister to the comfort ^md hajipin.'-- of his wife 
and cliildren. He att'i-ed tlie age of seventy- 




JA^[ES K. ^f-lin-'.K DY. 



W. .1. K. M' n.'KKDV. 



FAST AXI) 1'I;KSK\T OF r.UlJEAU corxTV 



four ycins, nud wlion called to liia liual re^L left 
behind hiiri an initaniished name and a inuinory 
that is cherished by friends and neighbors as well 
as his immediate family. 

Mrs. McCreedy still resides upon the old home- 
stead and superintends the place, two of her sons 
assisting her in the work, while ^Villiam owns 
and operates two liundred and fifty-nine acres 
of Lmd in Whiteside county, Illinois, this being 
his share of the estate. Mrs. McCreedy has a 
beautiful Iiouie standing iu the midst of well 
tilled fields and surrcnded by a fine lawn and 
shade trees. In addition to this property she 
owns four hundred acres of land in Fairfield 
county, Illinois, one hundred and sixty acres south 
of Arlington known as the. Little homestead, four 
hundred and forty acres in Chase county, Kansas, 
and some real estate in the village of Arlington. 
Her possessions altogether aggregate twelve hun- 
dred and forty acres, and in the management of 
her property interests Mrs. ilcCreedy has dis- 
played excellent business understanding and enter- 
prise. The family is one of prominence in the 
community, greatly esteemed by all with whom 
they have come in contact and Mrs. McCreedy 
has won tlie most kindly regard by reason of her 
many excellent traits of heart and mind. 



GEORGE AVASIIIXGTOX DABLER. 

Geoorge Washington Dablcr, one of Indiana's 
native sons now living in Bureau county, was born 
in Wabash, that state, on the 3d of December, 
lS-18, his parents being John and Saloma (Cha- 
riet) Dabler. The father was a native of Penn- 
sylvania, where be worked as a boat builder. At 
a later date ho took up his abode in Wabash coun- 
ty, Indiana, where he continued to make his home 
until lS-5?, when he removed to Bureau county, 
Illinois, and fop some time lived in the Bryan log 
cabin near Princeton. Subsequently he purchased 
forty acres of land, and soon after bought a land 
warrant from the war of 1S13 for one hundred 
and sixty acres, for which he paid at the rate of a 
dollar and a quarter per acre. Upon the farm he 
thus secured he spent the remainder of his days. 
His time and energies were given to general agri- 
cultural pursuits, which resulted in making him 
one of the substantial residents of the county. In 
186-5 he was called upon to mourn the loss of bis 
wife, who died on the 1st of July of that year, 
while he survived her for about thirty year-, jiass- 
ing away June 21, 1S94. 

George W. Dablcr jiursued a common-school ed- 
ucation in this county, whither he was brought by 
his parents when but four years of age. When but 
a young Ind lie began work in the fichls, taking his 
place behind the plow aud doing other labor inci- 
dent to the care and cultivation of the fields. 
Throughout his entire life he has been engaged in 
fanning, and the home place now comprises two 



luindroa and forty-si k acres of rich and arable 
land, on which are good buildings and excellent 
grades of stock. It shows in its neat and thrifty 
appearance his careful supervision and practical 
business methods. By the faithful performance of 
each day's duties he finds inspiration and courage 
for the labors of the succeeding day, and as the 
years go by he adds to his competence, so tliat he 
is now a substantial citizen of his counnunity. 

'Mr. Dabler was married to Miss Anna M. "Hart- 
man, a daughter of John Hartman, of Manlius 
township. Iler father was a native of Bucks coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, and came to Princeton in 1S53. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Dabler have been born eleven 
children who are living, while three have passed 
awav. Those v.dio still survive are: Charles H., 
Bertha M., Franklin L., Rose G., Harvey G., Jess 
W., Grover C, Earl K., Clifford, Ray C.'and Mar- 
shall. Those who have departed this'life are : Wil- 
liam, who died at ilie age of two months; John, 
who died at the age of nine years, and Saloma, 
when ten years of age. 

!Mr. Dabler has been road connnissioner for 
eighteen consecutive years, and treasurer of the 
board of commissioners for sixteen years. He has 
been elected on the democratic ticket, and the fact 
that he has again and again been chosen to these 
offices is proof conclusive of his capaliility and the 
confidence reposed in liini by bis fellow-townsmen. 
He was appointed postmaster of Manlius under 
Grover Cleveland, and served from ISSf until 
1903. Fraternally he is connected with Hope 
lodge, Xo. 174, Mystic Workers, of Manlius, v.-hile 
all of the family are Baptists in religious faith, 
attending the services of that churcli and aiding 
in its work and support. 



ORRl.S W. MASOX. 

Orris W. ^[ason, engaged in general farming in 
Concord township, was born at Bada, Illinois, 
June 21. 1864. and is a =on of Cyrus Parker and 
Sarah Jane (Xoyes) ilascm, of whom mention is 
made on another page of this volume. The parents 
were of Scotch descent and were natives of X^ew 
Hampshire. The father, who devoted his life to 
farming and stock-raising, was born Augu?t 13, 
ISol, and died January S, IvSQT, while his wife, 
who was born February 2.5, 1S33, died March 3, 
Iftno. They were both members of the Buda 
Union Christian Society. 

Orris W. Mason pursued his education in the 
public schools of Buda and was reared to the occu- 
pation of farming, early becoming familiar with 
the work of field and meadow. He has always 
lived upon the home place with the exception of 
about a year and a quarter spent in Xel-'ra=ka. 
in the employ of J. H. Clark, of D.^rciiester. that 
state. He resides on section 33, Con.jord township, 
and iiwn^ and operates two hundred and tvvclve 
acres of rich farming land, which i= located in 



I'AST A\l) I'j; 



;k.\t of i;uj;KAr culx'J'v, 



Coiicui'J and ilaroii towunliips, and is eiiLiivl}' 
free from all indcbtedue.-s. In addition to the; 
farm he also has various iinaucial interests in dif- 
ferent places and he owns and operates the best 
equipped cider mill in the county with a capacity 
of three thousand gallons in ten hours. 

On the 15th of June, 1S03, at the home of tlie 
bride's parents, in Macon townshij), ]Mr. Mason 
was married to Miss Adah L. Chase, who was 
born February 1, 1873, in Buda, Illinois, a daugh- 
ter of James S. and Imogone L. (Hood) Chase. 
The father, born in Fairfield, Mitine, Juno 25, 
1831, died January 10, 18.97, only two days after 
the death of :\[r. Mason's father, ^frs. Chase, 
who was born June 10, 1850, at Indianapolis, 
Indiana, now resides in Buda. They were the 
parents of throe children: Adah L., George E. and 
Laura W., all residents of Buda. Mr. and :\[rs. 
Mason have two children : Celia Chase Mason, 
born April 2G, 1901, and Eunice Hood ]Mafoii, 
born January 23, 1903. 

In politics Mr. Mason is a republican, unfalter- 
ing in his allegiance to the party. He has served 
as director for six or seven years of the Bureau 
County & Wyanet Mutual insurance Company, 
and for the last three years has been its president 
The honors and emoluments of political ofTice, 
however, have no attraction for him, as he prefers 
to concentrate his energies upon his business af- 
fairs and other interests. He belongs to Buda 
lodge, Xo. 575, I. 0. 0. F., of which he has been 
noble grand for two terms: Buda lodge, Xo. 399, 
A. F. &: A. M., of which he was senior and junior 
warden one term ; the Buda Daughters of Re- 
bekah, Xo. 339 ; the Buda chapter of the Eastern 
Star, Xo. 248, of which he was worthy patron for 
four terms, and Buda encampment, Xo. 130, I. 
0. 0. F., of which he was chief patriarch fur one 
term. He is liberal in his religious views and i- a 
Unitarian in his afliliation, uhile for nine years 
he has been secretary of the Buda Union Christian 
Socictv. 



chai;le.s iiii;am i'etteys. 

Charles Hiram Petteys owns and operates a val- 
uable farm of one hundred and ninety-four acre- 
in Concord township. He was born at Janesville. 
Wisconsin, April 15, 1852, and is a .son of George 
and Sarah JI. (Wilber) Petteys. The father was 
a farmer by occupation and with his family re- 
moved to Boone countv, Illinois, from Wisconsin 
in 1853. The following year, however, he took 
up his abode in Henry '"county, this .-tate, whcrr 
he spent his remaining davs, passin" auav in 
August, 18G2. 

Charles H. Petteys was a youth of twelve year,- 
when, in ISG-i, he came to Bureau county to be- 
come a resident of ;^[acon township. His earlv 
education was aei|uirf(l in the district =.■:!.», Is and 
he afterward eontinurd hi^ .-tudlc- in P.u.-a bcin.- 



gradualcd frmn the high school there. His youth 
was largfly devoted to farm labor and he gained 
broad practical e.vperience in this direction. After 
leaving school he entered the railroad shops at 
Buda and was employed as a brakemau and in 
other railroad services for a year. Subsequently 
he returned to farming in ^lacon township, where 
he lived for four years, when he took up his abode 
in Concord township, in the vicinity of Buda, 
v.-here he has since remained. His tim'e and ener- 
gies are devoted to general agricultural pursuits, 
and ho owns one hundred and ninety-four acres 
of rich and arable land, constituting an e.vcel- 
lent farm that in its equipments has become 
known as one of the model farm properties of his 
locality. 

Mr. Petteys was married December 20, 1877, to 
iliss Ella M. Beckwith, of Buda, a daughter of 
W. X. Beckwith, a farmer and .stock-man. In liia 
religious views Mr. Petteys is a Congregationalist, 
holding membership with the church in Buda, and 
he stands for all that is right and just iti man's 
relations to his fellowman and for all that is pro- 
gressive and practical in citizenship. 



:\[RS. ALICE C. FAUliLE. 

Mr.-. Alice C. Fauble, residing in La Jloille, 
was horn in Clarion township. Bureau county, 
Illinois, October 6, 1860, and is a daughter of 
John and Lucy M. (Smith) Clapp. Her father 
was born in Xorthampton, Massachusetts, on the 
1st of October, 1S14, while the mother's birth 
occurred in Alden, Erie countv, Xew York, Ajiril 
19, 1818. In the year 1834 John Clanp arrived 
in Bureau county and on the 20th of October, 
l.s;;7, was married in Princetim to Miss Lucy if. 
Smith, whose residence here dated from almost a.= 
early a period as her husbaiuPs. ^Ir. Clapp wa< 
a farmer by occupation and owned at the time of 
bis death a tract of land of one hundred and 
sixtv aeres. In the familv were seven children: 
Charhs S., Harriet W., Cephas F., William A., 
Dwi-ht, Albert X., and Alice :\r. Of this family 
Charles was a soldier of the Civil war, enlisting 
from Jlliiidis at the beginning of hostilities, and 
he lost his life at the'^battle of Champion Hill 
on the ir.th of :Mav. 1SG3. 

The daughter Alice spent her girllmod days in 
her parents' honie and obtained', her education in 
the yiulilie s,]ien]<. On the 3i)th of August, 1881, 
she ga\e h(M' hand in marriage to John Fauble, 
who ua< tinr-u in Lee cnunty, Illinois. Xovember 
K;. ls.-,7. Tie was a farmer by occupation and 
beeame a re~ident of Bureau county in 1897. 
sriendinu' hi? remaining days here. He was the 
eunei- ai tlie tituc of his deatli of one hundred and 
iiftx-tl'fe acres f>f choice land, together with a 
hmiii' and lot. He displayed excellent tnanage- 
mrnt in ]\i< husine-s alfairs, cnml)ined with, keen 
-:ii:a(it\ and unfa'terin'' enterpri-e. so that what- 



PAST AM) 



;XT OF 



i;i:A[; coiwrv. 



ever he uiulertuok he earrieJ i'oi ward to success- 
ful coinpletion. llii lield nietiiber.-lii]) witli tlie 
.\lystie Workers, and was proaiincnt aud iiiflu- 
eutial ill eointiiunit} interests^ acting as a member 
of the viUage couueil and also as school director. 
Matters relating to the public welfare received his 
earnest consideration and he gave his support to 
whatever he deemed would prove of general good, 
lie held membership in the Evangelical church at 
Perkins' Grove and was one of its active, earnest 
and etlicient workers. His life was honorable and 
upright, lu~ aclion^ manly and sincere and his 
good qualities of heart and mind drew to liim the 
Iviendship and kindly regard of all with whom he 
came in contact, so tliat his death, which occurred 
on the 2yth of October, 1900, wa.s the occasion of 
deep and wide-spread regret. The community lost 
a valued citizen and liis family a devoted hus- 
band and father. 

Mrs. Fauble is a member of the Congregational 
church and of various societies connected there- 
with for the promotion of its growth and the ex- 
tension of its influence. She is a lady of excellent 
business ability, a capable financier, and is in 
every way able to manage her business interests, 
which are of considerable importance. The fami- 
ly to which she belongs is one of some note, her 
brother, Cephas, being a Congregational minister 
and state superintendent of liomo missionary work 
at Forest Grove, Oregon. !Mrs. Fauble is a lady of 
high attainments, of natural culture and refine- 
ment, and enjoys the esteem and good will of 
many friends. Her homo is justly celebrated for 
its gracious and pleasing hospitality and her co- 
operation may be relied upon in every good work. 



KEY. H. DECKEP. 

Pev. H. Decker has since 1887 been j>astor"of 
the Evangelical Lutheran Zion church in Clarion 
township. This cliurch was organized August 17. 
18.56, and Pcv. George Guebner became the first 
pastor. A few months later, however, he was suc- 
ceeded by Pev. I. Koch, who came in April, 1S-t7, 
and remained until December of that year, when 
Pev. George Guebner was called to take charge. 
He remnirTed from the SOth of May, 18.58, until 
August. ISGO, and was followed by Pev. IT. Ehlers. 
who continued as jinstor until October, 1SG7. His 
successor was the Pev. G. Albert Schieferdpckcr. 
wlio served the church until April, 187-1, when Pev. 
John Wittig was called to the pastorate, remaining 
until August, 1887. The Pcv. K. Heinrich A. 
Decker, then assuming the pastorate on the l-5th 
of September. 1887, has since ministered to the 
spiritual needs of his congregation and under his 
guidance the church has made substantial progress. 

Pev. Decker was born in Pcndsburg. Germanv. 
June 12. 18.51. and in 1873 came to America. He 
was assistant pastor of a church at Keokuk Junc- 
tion from December, 1874, until Febriiiirv. 1S7G, 



alter winch he filled the pastorate of St. Paal's 
church at FMuler and of St. Peter's church at 
Coat.-burg. Elmoi-, until lSti7. He was then 
called to his present charge, his pastorate here 
ciivering nearly twenty years. He was educated 
in the schools of Hadersleben and Schleswig and 
afterward in the ^Mission House of Melsungen, 
(leniiany, and in the ^Vartburg Seminary at St. 
Seb.ild, Iowa. In 187-1 this seminary was re- 
moved to Mendota, Illinois, and he finished his 
education there, being ordained to the priesthood 
on the 23d of June, 181 U, at Mendota. His life 
has since been devoted to his holy calling and his 
labors and etJorts have been of no restricted influ- 
ence but have borne good fruit in the ^rrowth of 
the church. 

Pev. Decker was married July 11. 187G, at 
Peoria, Illinois, to iliss Sophie Muenstermann, 
who was born in Hoenebach, Germany, January 
G, 1853, and came to this country on the same ship 
with her future husband. Their marriage has been 
blessed with nine children : C. August, who was 
born June 2-5, 1877, and is now pastor of a church 
in Peoria, Illinois; C. Heinrich T., wb.n -ivas born 
January 2, lS7i», and is a mining engineer in Ari- 
zona ; Pudolph F. C, who was born July 20, ISSl, 
and is a practicing physician; Paul G. H., who 
was born March. 2-5, 1883, and is now studying 
philosophy; Erich G. T., who was born August 
2, 1SS5, and is a telegraph operator in Colorado; 
Joliannes F. K., who was born Deceinlier 20, 1SS7, 
and died August 30, 1888; Theodore C. P., who 
was born December 7, 1890, and is a student in 
the cidlege at Clinton, Iowa; Elizabeth L. L. E., 
uh(i was born ^larch ',, 1892, and is at home; and 
Frieda M. :M., who was born .August 23. 1891. and 
is also with her j)arents. 

Politically Mr. Decker is a republican with in- 
dependent tendencies. He belongs to the Luth- 
eran synod of Iowa, and is president of the south- 
ern district of the synod. He has held several of 
the offices which have come as the gift of the 
cliurch through its auxiliary brandies. Zion 
church, of which he is now pastor, has a member- 
ship of sixty heads of families and an attendance 
of three hundred and fifty people. The house of 
worsliip wa- erected in 1S.57. the corner stone 
having been laid on the 11th of Octoi.er of that 
vear by the Pev. Koch, while the dedicatory ser- 
vices were conducted by the Pev. Gi-.d.mer. Sep- 
tember 19. 18.58. The" three members who ofti- 
einted at the laying of the corner stone were 
Frederick Stamberger. John F. ^Nfeier and Xicho- 
In- Gross. The church steeple was built in 1874, 
and two bells, placed therein, were dedicated on 
th.- 25th of October of that y.-ar. Th- church was 
enlarged in 1902 and a pipe organ secured, while 
at the same time new windows were purchased 
and put in. A I'cw Lutheran constitution was 
adopted Jantiary 13. 18G8. This chi-.rcii lias many 
associations for the people of Clarion township and 
it.: pastor has been the counselor and sympathetic 



;-30 



FAS'J- A\J) 



:-\T OF lU 



AL LOLXIV. 



aJviiLT ol' many of its la-.'iiiljL'i;, and iriLiiJs 
through a long period. IJe has worked uutinugly 
lor tlie upbuilding of the church and the e.\tenoiou 
of its influence and his wordi of wisdom and truth 
as pronounced in the pulpit Sunday after Sunday 
have led many to seek a better way of life, leading 
to th.e development of high character. The pastor 
enjoys the fullest regard of the entire comniuuity 
irrespective of religious faitli, his own life being 
largely an e.xempliticatiou of his teaching. lie 
was ably qualified by liberal educational advan- 
tages for liis holy calling and since leaving college 
he has been unfaltering in his devotion to the 
church and its work, his labors proving a strong 
element in the moral development of Clnriou town- 
ship. 



HENKY C. CODDINGTOX. 
Henry C. Coddington, a retired farmer resid- 
ing at the corner of Warren and Fourth streets in 
Princeton, is one of Bureau county's native sons, 
having first opened his eyes to the light of day on 
the Hth of August, 1850, on the old family home- 
stead in Dover township. His parents were James 
and Catherine (Fear) Coddington. The father 
was born, reared and married in Allegany county, 
Maryland, but at an early day emigrated to Bu- 
reau county, Illinois. Ho comes of good old Revo- 
lutionary stock and is of Scotch descent. When 
the colonists resolved to throw off the yoke of 
British oppression his grandfather, Benjamin 
Coddington, shouldered his musket and went to 
the front to aid in securing independence. After 
hostilities ceased and peace was once more estab- 
lished he located upon a farm in Maryland, v.diicli 
he operated with the aid of the numerous .slaves 
that he owned. 

It was upon that plantation that James Cod- 
dington, father of our subject, was born January 
25, 179S, and he was there reared to manhood in 
the usual manner of sons of the planters of the 
south in comfortable circumstances. In lS3i ho 
started for Illinois, walking part of the way and 
traveling by water to some extent. At Icng'th he 
landed at Hennepin, Illinois, whence he came to 
Bureau county, and here ho invested in land in 
Dover township, upon which he spent his remain- 
ing days as a farmer. He took prairie land, 
which was scarcely improved, save that a little 
cabin had been built. He paid a dollar and a 
quarter per acre for two hundred acres and he 
placed all of the improvements upon tlie property, 
which in course of time was transformed from "a 
wild, uncultivated tract of land into one of rich 
fertility, adorned with all of the evidences of the 
model farm. In early days he hauled his grain 
to Chicago and Henry C. Coddington now has in 
his possession a grindstone for which his father 
traded an entire load of wheat in Chicago. James 
Coddington uas a stalwart republican, "but with- 



out aspiration for oliiee. He attended tlie Meth- 
odist church and Sunday-.-ehool at Dover and his 
influence was always ou'th.e side of right and jus- 
tice, although he did not hold membership in 'the 
church. Ho was accidentally killed by being 
thrown from a buggy in June^ ISrC, while on a 
visit to his native state. His family numbered 
ten children, three of whom are living: Henry 
C; Harvey J., who resides upon a farm in Dover 
township; and Mrs. Annie Frazec, the wife of 
Milford Frazec, residing near her brother Henry. 
Reared on the old homestead, Henry C. Cod- 
dington at the usual age began his education in 
the public schools and when not busy witli his 
text-books his time was largely occupied with the 
work of the fields or othei-" tasks connected with 
the farm work. He remained with his father un- 
til the latter's death and then succeeded to the 
ownershiji of two hundred acres of land, to which 
he has added until his real-estate holdings com- 
prise live hundred and sixteen acres of very valu- 
able farming land in. Bureau county. For a con- 
siderable period he devoted his tin-.e and energies 
to the labors of the farm and continued to reside 
upon tlie old homestead in Dover township until 
li'OG, when he retired to Princetoti, whcie he pur- 
chased a new and beautiful residence. Upon the 
home place is a large brick residence of ten rooms 
and two large halls, all lighted and heated by gas. 
Mr. Coddington added all modern equipments to 
his farm and has there a natural gas well, one 
hundred and sixty feet deep with twenty pounds 
pressure. This has been iu continuous operation 
since 1SD7. Mr. Coddingt.-.n became well known 
as a successful stockmai'i and from 1SS9 until 
1899 handled Galloway cattle, while since the lat- 
ter date he has handled Hereford cattle. His 
cattle are thoroughbreds and he has the best herd 
in the county, numljcriug horn forty to tifty head. 
He also raises Poland Chiiia hogs'and is one of 
the substantial farmers of th.e county. 

On the ^Sd of December, 1576, ^[t. Coddington 
was united in marriage to Miss Mary Ann Pierce, 
of Paw Paw, Lee county, Klinois, a daughter of 
Charles Pierce, who was born in Kingston, Penn- 
sylvania, and became a resident of Lee county in 
1835. There he opened up :>. farm of three hun- 
dred and twenty-five iures o: land and became a 
representative citizen of that county, continuing 
his residence there until cai'ed to his final rest. 
Six children have been born unto .\fr. and !Mrs. 
Coddington: Charles J., born March 21, 1877; 
Emma, who died in 1903; ^Lvjel, born in August. 
ISSl; :\[artha and Mary, twins, born July 29. 
1835, the former now the wife of Alljert Schmaus, 
of Ohio, Illinois; and JIary. the wife of Elmer 
Hoover, their home being ujion the old home- 
stead in Dover township; an.; Piiilip Raymond, 
who was born Xovembcr 10, 1>'90. The wife and 
mother died DoceUiber 10. KmU, and Xovember 
23, 190.-.. Mr. Coddin..t..n was married to M:-s. 




ir. c. coDDixo'rox. 



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AMKS (ODIUNCTOX. 



PAST AXL) 1' 



OF };i i!i:\r corxTv 



Nellie Klaiicliavil, a nativ,. of .Miluaulov, Wi- 
coiiiin. 

Mr. CoJdiii.^toii \uU's with tlio ropulilirari party 
and keeps well infi)rnied on tlie qiiestiuus and is- 
sues of tlic daj', so that he is able to support his 
political position by intelligent r.rgujnent. Fra- 
terualiy he is connected with Bureau lodge, No. 
112, A. r. & A. 'SI., and I'riuceton chapter, A'o. 
28, li. A. M. llii cliililren are members of the 
English Lutheran cluireh. In his business affairs 
he has prospered and is now one of the extensive 
landowners of tlic county. Througli his carefully 
directed labors he has been able to provide his 
family with tlic comforts of life and has more- 
over a splendid competence. Although he inher- 
ited the farm hjs prosperity is largely attributable 
to his continued activity and energy and his well 
directed labors. He is seldom at error in matters 
of business judgment and is still supervising bis 
farming and stock-raising interests, from which 
he derives a verv gratifving financial return. 



LEWIS M. PETEK'SOX. 

Lewis it. Peterson, familiarly ealled ■■Uncle 
Louie" whi-rever he is known, is ik.iw a retired 
farmer of Bureau county, still hohlirig large 
landed interests in Wyanel and Concord town- 
ships, lie resides in the village of M'yanet in the 
enjoyment of well earned rest, which has come to 
him as a reward of earnest, persistent and con- 
secutive labor in former years. lie was born in 
Sweden in 18 P3 and is a son of I'eter Olson, who 
came to Bureau county in ISGS and died soon 
afterward. 

Lewis M. Peterson received but limited educa- 
tional privileges in the schools of Sweden. He 
came to Bureau county in 180-5, when a young 
man of about twenty-three years, and here began 
farming, an occupation which he made his life 
work. At length when his labors had brought to 
him sufficient capital he purchased forty acres 
of land in Concord township, for which he paid 
twenty-eight dollars per acre, earning the money 
by chopping wood and splitting rails. He began 
the development and improvement of the land 
and as the years have passed and his financial re- 
sources have increased he has added to this forty 
acres until ho now owns eight hundred and fifty 
acres of fine land in Bureau county, whirh is very 
valuable and desirable. He likewise has five hun- 
dred and si.vty acres in Colorado and is num- 
bered among the wealthy residents of this part of 
Illinois. His land is devoted to general farming 
and stock-raising and he continued as an~ active 
representative of agricultural interests until 1002, 
■when he retired from the more arduous duties of 
farm life and removed to Wyanet, where he built 
a beautiful home and has since lived. He has 
also erected two fine residences upon his two farms 
in Bureau coiintv and also on his farnr in Colo- 



rad.j, whuh are almost equal to his splendid new 
residence in Wyanet. He is now one of the di- 
rectors of the Farmers' Elevator of Wyanet, wlii(.Ii 
was purchased by a company, of wliieh he is a 
member, in 1905. 

Mr. Peterson was married to Sophia Dahlberg, 
who was born in Sweden and came alone to this 
country. Six children were the result of this mar- 
riage. .-Ubcrt is married and lives upon his father's 
farm, which is located eight miles nortliwest of 
\\'yanet. Sarah Maria is married and lives upon 
her father's farm in Colorado. William makes his 
home in Xew Jersey. A. G. lives upon one of his 
father's farms near Wyanet. Eosa is at home, and 
Hihna is the wife of Oscar Eyburg, a resident of 
Princeton. 

Jtr. and Mrs. Peterson are members of the 
Swedish Lutheran church, in the work of which 
they are deeply interested and to the support of 
whiih they contribute liberally. Mr. Peterson is 
now serving both as deacon and trustee of the 
church. In politics he is a republican, who keeps 
well informed on the questions and issues of the 
day and does all in his power to promote the 
growth and insure the success of his parly, be- 
lieving that its policy is most conducive to" good 
government. Wlien ho arrived in this country ho 
had a capital of only four dollars and a half. He 
has worked hard until he is now one of the richest 
men in this part of the county. His farms arc 
all well improved and under a good state of culti- 
vation. He has indeed been a very successful man 
and is a leader among the Swedish-.Vmerican peo- 
ple of this portion of Illinois. His life record 
proves conclusively the value of industry and per- 
severance as a factor in business and should serve 
as a source of inspiration and encouragement to 
others, for, as the architect of his own fortunes, 
he has buildcd wiselv and well and his propcrtv 
interests are the visible evidence of a life of thrit't 
and well directed labor. 



GEOl.'GE M.VY. 
There are reprc'sentativcs of various nationali- 
ties in Bureau county but none have provc^n a more 
worthy element in its citizenship than those who 
have come from the fatherland. To this class bo- 
longs George Slay, who uas born in Prussia, Sep- 
ten'iber 22, 1832, and when twenty-two years of 
age crossed the Atlantic to the United States. 
Thinking that he would have better business op- 
portunities in the middle west, he continued his 
journey from the seaboard to Chicago, where ho 
remained for about four years. He then removed 
to Hennepin, Putnam county, wliere ho worked 
at farm labor until his diligence and enterprise 
had brought him sufficient capital to enable him 
to purcliaso a farm of his own. Later, however, 
he sold his property in Puiuam county and in 
1872 removed to Bureau county, where ho pur- 



I'A' 



ANJ) rj;i;sL;.\T of m iii-ai cointv 



chased eiglity an-rj, ccuistiuiliiij; tlio iim-lrus of 
his prcseut jioiiicsifud. As his Ihiaiiuial ivs.hiivl'S 
have increased and favorable oppijrtuiiitx- has of- 
fered he has added to the original trad" until lie 
now owns tliree liundred and twcnt}' aeres of pood 
fann land, ills jdaee is carefully cultivated and 
he annually harvests good crops. He is also a 
■stockholder in the Farmers' Elevator and is thus 
idcntilied with the grain trade of the county. 

Jlr. ilay was married in Hennepin, I'utnnni 
county, Illinois, to iliss ]..ucy Wintcrsein, a daugli- 
ter of Lambert and Jlary (Drasin) ^^'intersein, 
wlio were fanning people of Hennepin, Putnam 
count}-, Illinois. The wedding was celebrated 
June 2S, ISGO. and has been blessed with five 
living children: Anna May, now tlie wife of 
Nathan Coddington, a resident farmer of Bureau 
townshiji; Grorge P., who is also engaged in the 
tilling of ihe soil in Bureau township and who 
married ]Miss Kate Draman; "William Henry, a 
stock-buyer of itanlius, who wedded Miss Nellie 
Morgan, of Bureau township; Benjamin Frank, 
who is living in Manlius townsiiip: and Everett 
Forest, at lionie. One daughter, Mary, became 
the wife of Peter Johnson, of Irvington, Iowa, and 
.died in September, 1001. 

Mr. ]\Iay is an active repuldicnn, iuteirsted in 
the success of his party and doing all in his power 
to promote its growth and secure the adoption of 
its principles. He is recognized as one of its able 
and earnest workers in tliis locality and is num- 
bered among those who regard it as the duty as 
well as the privilege of every Aniericati citizen to 
exercise his right of franchise and thus support 
the principles in which he believes. Though born 
across the water he is thoroughly loyal in his de- 
votion to the stars and strijjcs and there would be 
naught said against the foreign clement if all 
manifested the spirit of allegiance and fidLlitv 
displaved bv Mr. Mav. On the tontrarv, such a 
citizenship would be gladly uvl, oiurd to American 
shores. 



SAMUEL S. EVANS. 

Samuel S. Evans is one of the younger repre- 
sentative business men of Princeton connected 
with the Evans, C'oppin^. & Slarks Company, which 
controls one of the leading productive industries of 
the city. In his business career he lias wrought 
along modern lines of development and progress, 
has sought out new methods for the enlargement 
of the trade and has manifested a spirit of enter- 
prise which has made him a leading business man 
of the county seat. 

Mr. Evans was born in Bureau county in l^'i'i, 
his parents being George P. and Arabella 
(I^fohler) Evans. The paternal grandfather, Win- 
field S. Evans, was born in Rockingham county. 
New Hampshire, ^larch S, ISK). aiul was a son of 
Samuel Evans, who was boiii in StrulTord county. 
New Ilamjishirf. The la?t naiiicd was a son of 



Edmund En.ui.s tbr found-r of the family in the 
nru world. i\,- was a native of England and witli 
a brother crossed the Atlantic to America, locating 
upon a farm in Stratford county. New Hamp- 
sluie. Both he and his brother served as soldiers 
of the Jicvokuionary war. Samuel ]-',vaus was one,- 
of a family of nineteen children, all of wliom 
reiuhed maniie year.-,. 'J'he eldest cliild, Louisa, 
luanietl a Mr. Layloii, a farmer of the old Granite 
state, and dii'd whi'ii in her one hundredth year. 

On reaching manhood Samuel Evans married 
ilis.- Hannah Woodman, ajiativc of }^e\v Hamp- 
shire, and afti-'rvvard worked at his trade of black- 
smithing in Nottingham, that state, where his 
death occurred when his son W. S. Evans was 
seven years of age, and the following year his wife 
also passed away. W'infleld S. Evans was the 
third in order of birth in their family of six chil- 
dren, the others being Elvin A., William Harrison, 
Samuel Plummer, Soplironia and Leazer W. P. 

I'be advantages, educational and otherwise, 
which were afforded ^Vinfield S. I-]vans in his 
youth were very meager, but he became a well in- 
formed man through his own efforts, broadening 
his knowledge by e.xperience, observation and read- 
ing. After tlie death of his parents he was reared 
to .--ome e.xtent by others but was early thrown 
upon his ov.'u resources. For a time he worked for 
his brother in Salem, Massachusetts, and then re- 
turned to New Hampshire, where he ivas employed 
on a farm for two months. The following winter 
and spring, liowever, he was again with his 
brotlier. Going to Brooklitie, Massachusetts, he 
secured a position as a gardener, remaining with 
one employer for three years, after which he went 
to Boston, where he was employed as a porter in a 
bank. Subsequently he spent two years in the 
service of a baker, boarding in his family. 

\\'in'licld S. Evans was married while in Boston 
on the 13th of July, 1SP3, to Miss Sarah J. Lang- 
ley, who was born, reared and educated in the same 
neighborhood in New Hampshire as her husband. 
In IS.iO he came to the west, making his way to 
Bureau county, and was so well pleased with this 
locality that he returned to Boston the following 
year and brought his family to Illinois, and stili 
resides in this county. Here he turned his atten- 
tion to farming and was very successful in that 
pursuit, so that he is now enalileil to live a retired 
life in Princeton. His wife jws.-ed away'in April, 
ISSO. 

Their only son, George P. Evans, was born in 
Boston and was provided with good educational 
privileges. Coming with his parents to Illinois ho 
was reared to the occupation of farming and after- 
ward carried on that pursuit on his own account, 
but in later years has lived retired in Princeton. 
He married ili^s Arabella Mohler. a daughter of 
Samuel and Caroline Mohler. natives of Ilarris- 
burg. Pennsvhania. Three children were born 
unto :\[r. and' ^[rs. George Evans: Caroline J., the 
Hife of Scolt T;. Coi>i.ins, a member of the Evans. 



PAST AM) J'i.'KSKX' 



i;ri;i;A[' corxTv 



Ojppins >!^' Stitrks Cdiniiaiiv of I'liin clou ; Samuel 
Scott, of this ruviuw; and llarrj- A., at li.Hiie. 

yaiiiucl S. Evans spent his boyhocid days undiT 
the parental roof and after aocjuiiinij his educa- 
tion in the sehools of Princeton devoted a niuaher 
of years to the abstract business. He then turned 
his attention to manufacturing interests, witli 
which he is still connected as the senior member 
of the above firm, manufacturers of ball-i)earing 
axles, shaft holders and quick shifters. They also 
conduct a wholesale and retail trade as dealers in 
fine vehicles. Their factory in Princeton has now 
been in operation for five years and they employ 
twenty men thruughout the year and are also rep- 
resented on the road by five tra\eling salesmen. 
They manufacture ball-bearing a.xles (patented) 
and quick shaft couplers, and they carry the larg- 
est stock of vehicles in Illinois outside of Chicago, 
selling six thousand per year in a wholesale trade. 
The firm is now doing a mammoth business and 
makes shipments to Colorado, Xebraska, Kansas 
and other points in the west. They also ship 
axles from New York to the Pacific coast. The 
trade is extensive and growing and the success of 
the enterprise is largely attributable to the efforts 
of Mr. Evans, who is a most energetic and far- 
sighted business man. He is one of the promoters 
of commercial activity in Princeton and while 
winning a large measure of success he also belongs 
to that class of representative citizens who while 
advancing their own interests largely contribute to 
the general prosperity. 



icat and attnicti\r appraraiier, indi.ati 
IV and laluw ubu-h Mr. lia--- l./-lu«sup. 
and also of 1,1- -ood bu^in.-s al.iUt v. 



OSCAP S. BA.SS. 

Oscar S. Bass, who is engaged in general farm- 
ing in Berlin township, was born in Maiden, Bu- 
reau county. May 19, 1854, and is descended from 
New England ancestry. His father, Edwin Bass, 
was born in Connecticut. January 28, 1816, and 
was married in 1842 to Emeline J. "Stannard, whose 
birth occurred in the state of New York ilay 3, 
1824. They became early residents of Bureau 
county, settling within its borders during the pio- 
neer epoch in its history. In their family were the 
following named: Caroline, deceased; Lncian ; 
Luther G. ; Sidney and Charlotte, both deceased ; 
Oscar S. ; Edwin, who is mentioned elsewhere in 
this volume; Heber and Howard, twins, also de- 
ceased ; Wallace, and Alonzo C. 

Oscar S. Bass was reared on the old homestead 
farm and enjoyed excellent educational jirivileges. 
After attending the public schools he became a 
student in Chicago University, where he completed 
his course in 1880. The occupation to which he 
was reared lie has made his life work, and is a pros- 
perous and enterprising farmer of Berlin town- 
ship, having two liundred acres of land which he 
has brought under a high state of cultivation. The 
fields are well tilled and there are good Imildiugs 
and modern improvement-: on the tilace, which nrc- 



O.-car r.a-s was unitrd in marriage to Mi.-^s Cora 
.M. Cotlrcll, who was born in Bureau county, Au- 
gust 21, ISCI, her parents being Nicholas and 
Mary (Cole) Cottrell, both of whom were natives 
of Worth ingfon, :Massachusetts, where the father 
was born December 8, 1829, and the mother on 
the 7th of May, 1831. Jlrs. Bass is a lady of supe- 
rior culture, refinement and education, who com- 
pleted her studies in Smith College, in Massachu- 
setts. By her marriage she has become the mother 
of three children: Mary, born Juno 7, 188G; Ger- 
ald, January 4, 1889, and Helen, March 20, 1893. 
The eldest daughter will complete her education 
in Kalamazoo College, in :\Iichigan, where she is 
pursuing a classical course. It i.s the intention of 
ilr. and :\[rs. Bass to supply their other children 
with good educational privileges. Theirs is a pleas- 
ant and attractive home, standing in the midst of 
a fine farm of two hundred acres, and they are cor- 
dially received in the best liomcs where culture and 
intelligence are accojited as the passports to good 
society. 

Mr. Bass exercises his right of franchise in sup- 
port of tiie men and measures of the republican 
party, and lias been calleii by his fellow-townsmen 
to fill a number of public offices. He served as jus-^ 
ticc of the peace for two terms, has boon township 
assessor for three terms and is the present incum- 
bent, and is also acting as a member of the school 
board at this writing. He and his family are all 
members of the Baptist church with the e.xception 
of thoir son, who is a Presbyterian in religious 
faith. In a review of the life'record of Mr. Ba.ss 
it is evident that his success has come through 
frugality, business enterprise and irreproachable 
integrity, for these have been the salient features 
in his career, having been manifest throughout his 
entire business life, resulting in the prosperity 
which he is now enjoying. 



P. W. STOPY, D. V. S. 
Dr. P. W. Story, a veterinary surgeon, who has 
been located in Princeton since 188(3, enjoying a 
fine practice here, was boru in Bloomington, On- 
tario, Canada, in Occobcr, 18-37, his parents being 
William and Frances (Pobson) Story, who came 
from England about 1846 or 1848.' They were 
from Yorkshire, and the father's birth occurred 
near Scarborough, a town on the sea coast. He 
died in December, 1890, at the age of sixty-eight 
years, while his wife survived until August^ 1898, 
passing away at the age of seventy-seven. Two 
of her brothers came to America and served as sol- 
diers in the war of 1812. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
William Story were born twelve children, of whom 
eight sons and two daughters are yet living, while 



]'A-;t am 



Ai; coix'iv. 



two of tlif dauglui.'ib have pasii/d auay. One don, 
Maik SLory, is also a veteruiary surgeon, jkja 
jirac-tieing m Stark county, Itlumi.-. 

i)r. Slury of Uiis rcNiuw ua-s iLaird in (Jiiiario, 
aud al'ler aL-qairing liis proliininary cilueaUoii iu 
the ]>ublic SL-hools prepared for his professioa as 
a studeut iu the (JuLario \'eterinary College, at 
Torouto, from which lie was graduated with the 
chiss of 1SS7. Owing to the uecessity of making 
his own way iu the world he had practiced for 
some years before completiug his course and since 
his graduation he has continuously followed the 
profession, locating iu Princeton in 18SG, aud 
enjoying here a large and constantly growing pa- 
tronage, which is indicative of the skill and ability 
wliich he displays iu following his choseu calling. 

Dr. Story was married iu Canada to Miss Kachel 
L. Badgerow, who was born iu Ontario iu ISoG, a 
daugliter of Joseph aud Mary (Clark) Badgerow. 
Her maternal grandfather was a Baptist minister 
and was of English and Scotch descent. Her 
paternal grandfather served as a soldier in the 
war of 1S13. ilrs. Story was reared in Ontario, 
where she resided up to the time of her marriage. 
She, too, is a member of the Baptist church aud is 
a most estimable lady, having a circle of warm and 
admiring friends. I)r. Story is connected with 
the Masonic fraternity, holding membership iu 
Bureau lodge, Xo. 112, A. F. & A. M., and in poli- 
tics lie is independent. "Well qualified for the voca- 
tion to which he has given his energies, he has 
met with creditable success in practice and is a 
leading representative of his profession in Bureau 
countv. 



REV. -WILLIAM MUBTAUGII. 
Eev. ■William Murtaugh, a priest of the Cath- 
olic church whose field of labor includes Shef- 
field aud Wyanct, his home being in the former 
city, was born at Chatsworth, Livingston county, 
Illinois, July 5, 1860. His father Owen Mur- 
taugh, was born in County Louth, Ireland,. Janu- 
ary 8, 182G, and was the son of a farmer. He was 
reared to farm life and when twenty-six years of 
age came to America and worked at farm labor 
for three years. Attracted by tlie discovery of 
gold on the Pacific coast and hoping to realize a 
fortune in the mines of California, he proceeded 
southward to Xew Orleans and thence to Nica- 
raugua and up the river — the route being prac- 
tically the route of the present ship canal across 
the isthmus. He spent two years in mining in 
California, meeting with reasonable success and 
experiencing the usual hardships and privations 
of those early mining days on the coast. With a 
fair sum of money as the result of his two years' 
work he returned to Illinois and purchased eighty 
acres of land, while .subsequently he ij.ni_L;iit a half 
section in ^Marshall countv. Later ho ronunod In 
Livin<r<tou countv and fr.ini tliere t^^ Ford counts 



Illinois, whi'ie he engaged in fanning until It-'JO, 
wlieti lie look up hi; abode in Cliatsworth, retir- 
ing from active business life. In IS-'iTi he liad mar- 
ried Miss JSridgct Lawless, of Marshall county, 
Illinois, who died in ISUl, aud subsequently he 
wedded ^liss Alice Cleary, of Wilmington, Will 
county, Illinois. Mr. Jlurtaugh held mauy offices 
of trust in the communities iu which he resided 
and was a most faithful incumbent, ever discharg- 
ing his duties to the best of his ability. In poli- 
tics he was a stanch democrat, thoroughly in sym- 
pathy with the princijilcs and policy of the party. 
He died May 11, lyOl, leaving behind the record 
of a successful aud honorable life. His children 
are the Eev. William Murtaugh, of this review; 
Frank; Alice; and a sou and daughter deceased. 

Father Murtaugh, whose name introduces this 
record, pursued his studies iu St. Mateur College 
at Kankakee, Illinois; at Watertown, Wisconsin; 
iu Grand Seminar}-, at Montreal, Canada; and in 
St. ^Mary's Seminary, at Baltimore, Maryland. At 
the last named he was made sub-deacon and after- 
ward deacon, Cardinal Gibbons officiating. He 
was ordained a priest at St. Mary's cathedral in 
Peoria, Illinois, August 6, ISSS, aud first served 
as assistant pastor at Pontiac for six months. He 
next had charge of the church at Chatsworth for 
about the same length of time, aud was assigned 
to Bureau county July 21, 1S98, his parish in- 
cluding ShetTield, Tiskilwa, Princeton and Wya- 
net, but his duties becoming too arduous he gave 
up Tiskilwa and Princeton in August, 190-5. For 
eight years he has labored among the Catholic 
families of this part of the state and his efforts 
have not been without tangible results, as shown 
in the increased numerical strength of the church 
and the spiritual growth among his parishioners. 
He has not only cleared oil an indebtedness of 
four thousand dollars since he located here, but 
has also expended about eighteen hundred dol- 
lars on improvements to the church property. Up 
to this time he has held services in a schoolliouse 
at Wyanet, but has a fund started to build a 
church. He has about one hundred families in 
his charge, and visits the sick aud n^edy in Min- 
eral, Buda, Xeponset and Manlius, besides his 
parishioners in ShefSeld and Wyanet. Liberally 
educated and consecrated to the work of the 
church, his zeal and devotion arc recognized by 
all throughout the difTcrent towns in which his 
labors are put forth, and as a pleasant, genial 
gentleman he makes friends wherever he goes. 



LTXNEAUS A. BATTEV. 
Linneaus A. Bnttcy, who owns and controls an 
excellent farm on section 2i), Mineral towuship, 
dates his residetice in Ill'nois from IS-i-l, and dur- 
ing the greater part of the period has been a resi- 
dent of Bureau county. A native of Providence, 
Phode T-land, b.c was born Mav ]-). 1S53, and i.' 




EEV. \vii.i.i-U[ ^inrrArGiT. 



PAST AM) 



:si',\'i' OF 



■|;i:Ar corx'i'v 



a SMI of Sil;i> luu] Mn-cv (I'.rnnrlt) Hallcv, wliose^ 
sk.'t.h i. f..u,Kl d.rulinv m tins \voik. 

l.iuu.'.uis A. ]'.atto\ was uiily al».ut a vear oli! 
wliuii brought to lUiruau county, and in "his par- 
ents' homo his youth was passofl, liis education 
being acquired in the schools of Mineral township 
and of Princeton. On attaining his majority he 
started out in life for himself, working by the 
month as a farm hand for a year, and following 
his nuirriagc lie began business on his own ac- 
count. It was in Xovember, 1S75, that he wedded 
Miss Laura Scoughton, of Mineral township, who 
is a native of Xew York and a daughter of John 
and Mary (Vallcau) Scoughton. They began their 
domestic life upon a rented farm, after which I\[r. 
Battey purchased eighty acres of land, on which 
he has since lived. He is an able farmer, discrim- 
inating in his business interests and of sound 
judgment, and his well improved property is lack- 
ing in none of the accessories and equipments of 
a model farm of the twentieth century. 
. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Battey has been 
blessed with three children : Eva L., who was born 
August 12, ISTG, and since graduating from the 
Sheffield schools has engaged in teaching ; Pierrie 
A., who was born July 12, 18TS, and accidentally 
shot himself at Nickerson, Kansas, when thirteen 
years of age, his remains being interred in Shef- 
field cemetery, and Clair E., who was born Sep- 
tember 24, 1881. 

The parents hold mcmberslii|i in the Un'tariaii 
church, and Mr. Battey is identified with Mineral 
camp, Xo. 21, 'SL W. .\. His position on political 
questions is never an equivocal one. He has stood 
iirmly in. support of the republican party since 
casting his first presidential vote for Hayes in 
1876, and he has served as collector of ^^lineral 
township for several years and also as school di- 
rector. His devotion to the public good is above 
question, and has been nmnifest in many tangible 
ways. He and his family occupy an enviable social 
position, and the hosiiitality of their own home is 
greatly enjoyed by their many friends. ;Mr. Bat- 
tey is one whose success in life has been builded 
upon energy and determination rather than inher- 
itance or any fortunate combination of circum- 
stances, and his history stands in exemplification 
of the fact that prosperity results from the i-fTorts 
of the individual. 



L. 0. JfAY. 
In a history of commercial progress in Tiskilwa 
mention should be made of L. 0. ^fay, who is en- 
gaged in the furniture and iindertaking business 
under the firm style of L. 0. May fr Son. For 
twenty-five years he has occupied a foremost placa 
in tlio ranks of the business men of the town, and 
has also been a prominent faetor'in public afTairs 
here, serving at present writing as mayor of the 



villa:;r. Ill- birth o.runvd in Indanln-.^ n K.u n- 
shi|i m ISir,. II,,, falh.-r. .\uiuii Mav. ranic rn.ni 
.\ll.ranv (ouiitv, .\r\v V..vk. to liurcau county in 
is:;-.', hut hrfniv il„. tri.nmatiou of a u-av re- 
turned to the ca-^t. llr had lormcd a stn.^- 
tachnient for the middle we,-,t, however, and in 
is:'.i; he brought liis family with him to JUino .s, 
locating in Indiantown township. He came of one 
of the old families of New York of English lin- 
eage. His wife bore the maiden name of Elizabeth 
Xorton, and was reared in Belmont, Allegany 
county, Xew York. Aaron Jfay was a farmer by 
occupation, and in Indiantown township purchased 
land which he cultivated and improved, owning at 
one time a valuable tract of three huiu.lred and 
twenty acres and several tracts of timber land, so 
that his ])osscssions aggregated about six liundred 
acres. Subsequently he invested extensively in 
properly in Missouri and removed to that state, 
liis death occurring in Ravanna. His family num- 
bered nine children, four of whom yet survive, 
namely: Mrs. Judith Freeman, a widow, residing 
in Los Angeles, California; ^frs. Carrie P.elcher, 
a widow, living in Tiskilwa; T;. 0., of this review, 
and I.e l!ov. who occupies his father's old home in 
^rissouii. 

L. O. .May is indebted to the [uiblic schools of 
this county for tlie educational privileges he en- 
joyed. He started out in life on his own account 
at the age of twenty-one years, being employed at 
farm labor in Indiantown township rmtil he carne 
to Tiskilwa in ISSl, since which time he has been 
engaged in his present line of business, covering 
a period of a quarter of a century. The firm now 
consists of L. 0. May and his son. G. A. Z^Iay, and 
they carry a complete line of all kinds of furni- 
ture, carpets and other house furnishings, and also 
have a fine hearse and ambulance for their under- 
taking business. Their well selected stock and 
reasonable prices secure to them a liberal ]>atron- 
age. and their trade is now profitable. 

Mr. May was married in 1SG9 to Emma L. 
Howe, a native of 'Wayne county, Xew York, and 
a daughter of Isaac Kowe, who came to Bureau 
county at an early day from the Empire state, 
establishing his home in Tiskilwa, where he en- 
gaged in the furniture business for twenty years, 
hcL'inning about ISG.T. Mr. Jfay made his start in 
this line "by purchasing an interest in the business. 
In 1899 Mr. May was called upon to mourn the 
loss of his wife, "who died in June of that year, 
leaving three sons, as well as her husband, to 
mourn her death. Gardner .\., the eldest, now in 
business with his father, married Jennie L. Smith, 
of Geneseo, Illinois, and they have one child. Dor- 
othy, three and a half years of age. Edgar married 
Catherine P.artholoniew, of Wayne county, Xew 
York, and is now manager of the Independent 
Teleplione Company at Tiskilwa. Clyde L.. living 
at home, has been a traveling salesman for six or 



PAST AND l'j;i;SEXT OF ULKKAU COL-.\'J'Y. 



rolitieally .^Ir. May is a stalwart I'Oi.ul.liLan ami 
is now serving for the tliirJ torni as iiiavDr of Tis- 
kilwa, having been re-elected in Ajjril, lUOJ. That 
he has given a public-spirited, business-like and 
progressive administi'ation is indicated by the fact 
that he has been three time.5 chosen for chief exec- 
utive oflieer of the village. He and his eldest son 
are members of Snatclnvine lodge, ISTo. 1-17, I. 0. 
0. F., of Tiskilwa, and of Princeton encampment, 
while the son holds membership in Tiskilwa lodge, 
No. 550, A. F. & A. J[. ilr. ilay is a comnrnni- 
cant of the Episcopal clmrch, and iu all life's rela- 
tions has manifested sterling traits of character 
and fidelity to high and honorable principles. His 
advancement is due to his own labor and the exer- 
cise of his native talents, and as the years have 
passed'he has ever been accorded by public opinion 
a foremost place in commercial circles aTid public 
life in the town where he makes liis home. 



JOHX W. WHITE. 

John W. ^\"hite well deserves representaiion in 
the history of his native county and with pleasure 
we present the record of his life as that of a rep- 
resentative fanner who in all public and private 
relations has commanded the good will and confi- 
dence of his fellowraen. He still lives in his native 
township of Macon, where he was born on the 
4th of April, 1S59, his parents being William C. 
and Elizabeth A. White. The fatlier was born in 
Ohio, July 7, 1821, and was a son of John and 
Jane (liobertson) White. John White was of 
German lineage but was born in Xcw Jersey and 
his wife was a native of Scotland. 

In early life ^\'illianl C. ^\^lite learned and fol- 
lowed the miller's trade and in Ohio owned a 
tlouring mill, which he conducted in connection 
with the operation of a turning lathe. In the 
spring of ISIP he went to California, where he en- 
gaged in mining and dealing in cattle until 1S52, 
when he became a resident of Henry county, Illi- 
nois, where his parents were then living. In the 
fall of the same year he purchased from Mr. 
Motherell the farm that was first settled in !Macon 
township and in 185-3 he bought what has since 
been known a; the homestead property of the 
White family. He lived for a ntimber of years in 
a log cabin but afterward erected a more commo- 
dious and modern frame residence. He gave most 
of his attention to stock-raising and was very suc- 
cessful. As he prospered in his undertakings he 
invested more and more largely in land and at one 
time owned five hundred and thirty-two acres of 
prairie and timber land. He never cared for pub- 
lic office nor sought political preferment, content 
to concentrate his energies upon his business inter- 
ests. He held membership, however, witli the Bap- 
tist churcli of Buda and acted as superintendent of 
the Walnut Grove Sunday school. He took a most 
helpful part in its work and also contributed 



liberally to the support of other churches and to- 
ward the advaneeiiieiiL of any good cause. His 
political allegiance was given to the republican 
party. He was unable to enter the service during 
the Civil war but did much for those at the front 
and was known as ''che soldier's friend.'' On the 
2Stli of December, 1S51, in Bureau county, he 
married Elizabeth A. Lewis and thev became the 
parents of nine children. The death of ilr. 'WTiite 
occurred ^lardi G, ISTl. His wife, who was born 
iu Utica, New York, is now living in Kewanee, Illi- 
nois. Of the family the following record is given. 
Loretta J. was born October 16, 1S55. Florence 
A., born August 29, 1857, died March 29, 1SG3. 
John "William is the third of the family. David 
A., born January 1, ISGl, died March 8, 1S62. 
Carrie A., born l)eccmber 20, 1SG2, was married 
October 29, 1883, to Charles Wolfersbergcr, of 
Princeton. Sarah E., born October 17, 18G6, is 
the wife of William Hewitt. Warren J. was born 
May 10, 1868. Martin E. was born January 11, 
1S70. Ellen C, born October IS, 1872, is now the 
wife of Harvey McMullcn. 

It will be interesting in this connection to note 
something of the maternal ancestry of the White 
family. The mother of our subject was a daugh- 
ter of John W. and Ann (Poberts) Lewis. Her 
father was born December 1-1, 1807, in Lewis 
county, Xew York, and was a son of William I. 
Lewis and a grandson of John Lewis, who came 
to the L'nited States from Wales about 1781. Wil- 
liam I. Lewis had one sister who came at the same 
time and who married a Mr. Jones, settling in 
Philadelpliia. William I. Lewis and his brother, 
Lewis Lewis, settled vvith their father near Tren- 
ton Falls, New Y''ork, and their descendants still 
live there. Both of the brothers served in the war 
of 1812. John W. ],cwis, the eldest sou of Wil- 
liam I. Lewis, came to Bureau county in 1853 and 
in the fall of the same year took up his abode on 
the northwest quarter of section 15, Macon town- 
."^hip, where he lived until his death, January S, 
1873. In March, 1S32, he married Ann I'oberts, 
who was born in Wales, August IS, 1813, and was 
brought to this country by her parents when three 
years of age. She died November 16, 187-1. She 
was the mother of twelve children, naniely: Wil- 
liam, Elizabetli, Sarah. David, John, Walter, 
Henry, Ellen, Thomas, Jerome, George and Al- 
bert. ' "^'alter died in New York in 1813 but the 
other members of the family came to this county 
with their parents. 

John W. White, whose name introduces this rec- 
ord, was reared in the usual manner of farm lads, 
attending the district schools in the winter season 
and working on the fann through the summer 
months. He remained at home to tlic age of 
twenty-four years and then began farming for 
himself soutli of the old liomestead, where lie cul- 
tivated one hundred and sixty acres of land. In 
1898 ho erected a residence on what was known 
as the old irotherell property and he is today cu!- 



I'A^T A\J) I'J; 



;xT 



IK" 



HAT (OIX'IA 



4:;. 



tiv;itiiit' ;i farm of 011c liuiiJreJ and iweuty-seven 
ac ren of liis own and also rents some land. In 
I'JOO he piirehased a half seelioa of land in Tra- 
vtise county, ilinnosota, three miles from Wliea- 
ton, the county seat. He is engaged in the breed- 
ing of Poland-China hogs and also raise.^ a good 
grade of cattle and horses. Ilis fields are well 
tilled and in his farming operations he is meeting 
witli success. His political allegiunee is given to 
the democracy but he neither seeks nor desires 
office as a reward for party fealty, preferring to 
give undivided attention to his business affairs. 

On the 31st of January, ISSl, Mr. ^^Tiite was 
married to Miss Annie Wood, who was boi-n in 
Macon township, July 2S, 1SG4, and is a daughter 
of Charles an.d Elizabeth (Gould) "Wood, promi- 
nent pioneer residents of this county, who are 
nientinucd at length on another page of this vol- 
ume. Mr. and Mrs. White have three children : 
Arilla E., who was born December 33, lSS-1, and 
is teaching in the Walnut Grove school; Yernc J., 
bora July 4, 1888; and Ethel, born May 20, 1890. 

Both parents are worthy representatives of 
prominent pioneer families of this county and, 
having always resided here, are widely known, 
while their many good qualities have gained for 
them the favoraljle regard of all with whom they 
have been associated. Mr. A\'liite has been a wit- 
ness of many of the events which have marked the 
county's development and progress and are now 
matters of history, and the good name made by his 
father has been, upheld by him, the ^^^lite family 
having been among the most respected families of 
Macon tov, nship for manv vears. 



EDWIN F. XOKTON. 
Edwin F. Norton, who is half owner of six hun- 
dred and sixty acres of valuable land in Bureau 
county, is well known as a breeder of sheep, goats 
and hogs, and his stock farm bears a good reputa- 
tion throughout the county and this portion of the 
state. He is a wide-awal^e and enterprising young 
business man, his home being in Xeponsct town- 
ship, which was also the place of his nativity. His 
natal day was July 26, 1SG6, and liis parents were 
George and Ann (Studlcy) Norton. The father, 
long a resident of Neponset, was born at Brawby, 
Yorkshire, England, March 24, 1817, and his par- 
ents, John and Sarah (Noble) Norton, were like- 
wise natives of England. In their family were six 
children, who reached years of maturity. On the 
1st of November, 1S40", the grandparents of our 
subject arrived in Bureau county and here spent 
their remaining days. They were active members 
of the Jlethodist Episcopal church and are still 
well remembered by many of the old settlers. 

George Norton came to Neponset in the spring 
of 184] and about 1844 entered some land, which 
beeanic the old homestead property. He adde^l to 
this froni time to time until he was the owner of 



a line place of ibrcf laindrej and twenty acres- 
which he brought under a high state of cultiva- 
tion, adding thereto many improvements. His 
success in life may be honestly atlribtiled to his 
perseverance and industry, for he started out on 
his own account empty handed. He was married 
April 13, 1847, to Miss Ann Studley, who was born 
in England, January 6, 1827, and about 1S3G was 
taken to IMorgan county, Illinois, by her parents, 
William and Annie (Chapman) Studley, who were 
early settlers of Neponset town.^hip. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. George Norton were born ten children. Sarah 
A., born February 5, 1848, became the wife of 
William Hood, and died February 2G, 1900. Eliza, 
born February 25, 1850, is living in Neponset 
township. Thomas N., born February 17, 1853, 
follows farming in Iowa. Emma, born July 4, 
1855, is the wife of John Scaife, of Neponset. 
Levi G., born October 15, 1857, is also living in 
Neponset. Addie J., born December 5, 1859, is 
the deceased wife of Walter Pratt. Moses J. is in 
partnership with his brother Edwin. Fannie E. 
died April 12, 1889, at the age of twenty-five years. 
Edwin F. is the next of the family. Iroiux C. is 
the wife of Pev. Sanford P. Archer, a minister of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. Jlr. and Mrs. 
Norton were al,;o active arid devoted members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and his political 
allegiance was given to the republican party, whieli 
found in him a stalwart champion, every loyal to 
its interests. He died September 20, 1887, and is 
still siiivivcd by his wife, who lives in Nei)onset. 

Edwin F. Norton is indebted to the public school 
system of Neponset township for the early educa- 
tional privileges wdiich he enjoyed, and he was 
further" qualified for life's practical and responsi- 
ble duties by a course in a business college at 
Quiney, Illinois. He started in business on his own 
account in 1888, when a young num of twenty-two 
years, being associated with liis brother, IMoses J. 
Norton, in farming and stock-raising on two hun- 
dred acres of land in Neponset township. In the 
fall of 1892 they acquired one hundred and sixty 
acres of land in ilacon townsliip, and in March, 
1899, purchased other property in the same town- 
ship. In June, 1902. they made purchase of one 
hundred and sixty acres more in the same town- 
ship, and they are today owners of six hundred 
and sixty acres of valuable land in Bureau county. 
In the fall of 1S93 they went to Billings, Mon- 
tana, and purchased twelve hundred head of grad- 
ed Merino sheep fur breeding purposes. Th.ey have 
since been engaged in tlie bre.^ling of sheep, and 
now have a iTock of four hund'-ed at the present 
time. They also have about five hundred head of 
hogs, and they ship their own hoirs to the Chicago 
market. They also buy and feed cattle, which they 
ship to Chicago, sending about two carloads each 
vear, and they breed horses for their own use. 
Their stock-raising interests are an important 
source of revenue to them, and they are accounted, 
leadincr stockmen of the countv. Thev are also 



r4t 



l'AS-|' 



AM 



■|;i 



corxi V 



bruc^lcrs of Aurora goats, lia\iiig a -ouJ Hook ol' 
high-brea animals on tlioir jilaco. 

On Uie 25tlv of .A[ny, ISOS, Jvlum F. Norton 
was niarrieil to ^liss Josi'phine ].'. Sciiit, wlio «a; 
born in Ncpoiiset township, April 3, JbTi', and is 
a daiiglitcr of Robert ami ])oborah (Diifee) Scott, 
wlio are mentioned on another page of this work 
in connection with the history of her brother, 0. 
j\I. Scott. Unto Mr. and ilrs. Norton has been 
born one son, John Ward, whose birth occurred 
Marcli 30, 190-1. The parents are well known and 
prominent socially, and their own home is attrac- 
tive because of its warm-hearted and gracious hos- 
pitality. Mr. Norton has soi'ved as assessor for 
tliree terms and gives his political support to the 
republican party. He is loyal and progressive in 
his citizenship, and his eft'orts for the public good 
have Loen far-reaching and beneficial, yet he has 
never sought to figure as an office seeker. 

]\roses J. Norton, brother and partner of Edwin 
F. Norton, was born where he now lives, upon the 
old h( mcstead farm, January 8, 18G'2, and, like 
his brother, was educated in the public schools. 
They have long been associated in business, and 
are pi'ominent as stock-raisers of Illinois, in which 
connection they are widely known through the 
state. Moses Norton is also a stalwart republican, 
and for three term.? has served as a member of the 
village board of Neponset. Both are accounted 
enterprising business rnen, wlio keep in touch with 
the spirit of the times, and their eflorfs for indi- 
vidual prosperity also result beneficially for the 
county in tlie promotion of agricultural and com- 
mercial activity, whereon the success and growtli 
of every conimunity depemls. 



gko];gI': littlkwood. 

George Littlew,.od, living in La Moille town- 
ship, is a native of England, his birtli havinLT oc- 
curred there on the 2(jth of July, ISG.J. His par- 
ents, Samuel and Sarali (Smith) Littlewood, were 
likewise natives of that country, where Tliey spent 
their entire lives. In the common schools of Eng- 
land their son George acquired liis education, re- 
maining in tiie land of liis birth until 18S2, when 
at the age of seventeen year? he crossed the Atlan- 
tic to America and became a resident of 15ureau 
county, Illinois. Here he devoted his time and en- 
ergies to farm labor, and, althougli his posscss-ons 
were quite limited when he came to the new woiM, 
he is now known as one of the wealthy and sub- 
stantial agriculturists of Bureau county. His 
farm comyjrises one hundred and sixtv acres of 
choice land, for which he paid si.xty-fivc dollars 
per acre, and which is today worth from one hun- 
dred and fifty to two hundred dollars jut acre. 

'Mr. Iiittlewood wns married to Miss .\nna 
Swanlund, whose birth occurred in Bureau countv 
October 10, 1871. This marria-.^ has been ble^-ed 
with four (bildrcii: William M.. born Deecml)er 



2.\ ISii:;; llainid i;.. Juur 21, l^:l.S; Ellen V., 
.Vovrml,,.,- e:,, 1900, and Albert E., March 2(J, 
IIMJI. Tin' family are now nicely located in a new 
resideni e which was built about Iwo years ago, and 
which in its tasteful furnishings and attractive 
surroundings makes it one of the delightful coun- 
try homes of La Moille township. Mr. Littlewood 
is now erecting an excellent barn, forty by si.xty 
feet, and altogether has one of the finest set? of 
farm buildings in the county. He is recognized as 
one of the leading agriculturists of his townshij:. 
and deserves much credit for what he has accom- 
plished, for he is still a young man. If he lives to 
the allotted age of threescore years and ten he will 
undoubtedly become one of tlie wealthiest citizens 
of this part of the state. He raises good crops, and 
is engaged in breeding Norman and Clydesdale 
horses. He also has hogs which are cross-bred be- 
tween tlie Poland China and Chester White. Ev- 
erything about his place is in keeping with the 
spirit of modern agricultural progress and suc- 
cessful accomplishment. 

Mr. Littlewood fraternally is identified with the 
Modern Woodmen of America, and his political 
support is stancldy given to the republican party. 
His wife belongs to the Methodist church, and the 
family attend its ser\ices. Mr. Littlewood has 
served for several terms as school director, and the 
cause of education finds in him a warm friend, 
while to his family he is providing excellent oppor- 
tunities in that direction, realizing the value of 
mental discipline as a training for life's practical 
and responsible duties. His ambition is to provide 
a good home and comfortable living for his fam- 
ily, and that he is a man of kindly nature and gen- 
erous disposition is indicated in his face and man- 
ner. All who come in contact with him entertain 
for him warm regard, and the name of George 
Littlewood is an honored one in this community. 
Coming from Englaiul when a young man, he has 
never had occasion to regret his determmation to 
seek a home in the new world, with its broader 
business opportunities ami advancement more 
quickly secured. 



CHAIJLES F. :\L\TSON. 
Charles F. ilatson, a representative of the farm- 
ing interests of Dover township, where he was 
born December 23, 18i;4, is a son of P^nos M. and 
Helen (Westbrook) ^latson, who became residents 
of Illinois at an early day, settling in Bureau 
countv upon the farm now owned bv their son 
Charles. The father landed in Hennepin, Put- 
nam county. Illiiuiis, with a family of nine chil- 
dren and onlv five dollars in money. He worked 
for nine dollars a month in order to s\ipport his 
family, aiul as the years pa-ed he added to his 
financial resources until at the time of his death 
be was worth tifty-four thou~an>l dollars, repre- 
sent iug the accumulations of a life-time. That: 





M- 


; .5 v=u. ,.. 


V )/ . -^^ .^■ 


1 ^--5<-- 






r; " ". : 


1 




! ■. ., 








C. F. MA'I'SON' A\I) FAMILY 



PAST AND i'KHSl'XT OF ilLKKAi" LULXTV 



Itriluit 



lie u-a. a laubt dili-ent aii.l wit 
iuditali'd by his :*UL(.L'JSjVluLh «\u 
to his good management. 

Charles F. Matsoii wa?. reared under the 
parental roof and is indebted to the public-school 
system of Bureau county for tlie educational privi- 
leges which he enjoyed in his youth. He com- 
pleted his education at the age of twenty-two 
years and remained at home until his marriage. 
He was reared to the occupation of farming, and 
has always made it his life work and is today the 
owner of two hundred and nineteen acres, which 
constituted a part of the old home property, tliat 
at one time comprised five hundred and nineteen 
acres. His father purchased this at a dollar and 
a quarter pcr_aere, and six years ago Charles P. 
Matson bought his farm at ninety dollars per 
acre, while today tlie property is easily worth one 
hundred and seventy-five dollars per acre. He 
raises corn, oats and hay, which are the staple 
crops of this section, and he also makes a spe- 
cialty of stock-raising, including horses, cattle 
and hogs. 

On the 23d of December, ISST, Mr. :\Iat=oii 
secured a companion and helpmate for life's 
journey by his marriage to Miss Clara E. Shettel, 
a daughter of Solomon and ilary Shettel, who 
came to Hlinois at an early period in its develop- 
ment. ^Ir. and IMrs. Jlatson now have but one 
child. Earl Y. S. Matson, who was born j\Iav 17, 
ISSS. 

In his political views Mr. Matson is a repub- 
lican, stalwart and earnest in support of the 
party, and on the issues of the day he is well 
informed, but has never been an aspirant for 
public oflice. Fraternally he is connected with 
the modern Woodmen of America and the Mystic 
Workers, and his religious faith is indicated by 
his membership in the English Lutheran church, 
to which his wife also belongs. An analyzation 
of his life record shows that honesty, industry 
and economy are his salient characteristics and 
have led to his success, making him one of tlie 
leading and prosperous farmers of Pover tov.-n- 
ship. 



JOHN DWYEn. 

±1 tlie citizenship of Bureau county among the 
sons of Ireland who have borne an important part 
in the business life which has brought about the 
present prosperity of this section of the state John 
Dwyer is numbered. He first opened his eyes to 
the light of day on the Emerald Isle, July 15, 
1840, his parents being Cornelius and Bridget 
(Burns) Dwyer. The father died in Ireland when 
his son John was but two years of age, and the 
mother afterward came to the United State.-^ with 
her family of four sons, crossing the Atlantic in 
the year 1S.52. Siie did not tarry on the eastern 
coast, but made her way to Springfitr-'d, Oliio, and 



afterward to [Miami county. On leaving the Buck- 
eye state she beeam- a resident of llliiK.is, and her 
last days were spent in the village of Arlington, 
Bureau county. 

John Dwyer of this review was a youtii of but 
twelve years when lie left the land of his na'ivity 
and came with his mother to the new world. For 
three years he resided in Springfield, Ohio, and 
on the expiration of that period went to riliami 
county, where he learned the cabinet-maker's trade. 
He afterward removed to Dayton, Ohio, where 
lived his brother, Dennis Dwyer, a prominent and 
influential citizen there, who for nine years filled 
the position of judge of probate. Later he became 
judge of the superior court, remaining upon that 
bench for six years. He was likewise Judge of the 
court of common picas for ten years, his judicial 
service covering altogether twenty-four years. That 
he was a distinguished and able juris: is indi -ated 
by the fact that in all that time he had but one 
decision reversed. He has figured prominently in 
connection with the legal history of Ohio, and at 
the present writing he is president of the inter- 
urban railroad, v.ith a line extending from Dayton 
to Cincinnati. 

While John Dwyer did not pursue his education 
consecutively, he resumed his studies after the re- 
moval of the family to Arlington. He has always 
been a great reader and a strong supporter of pub- 
lic education, his influence being ever given on the 
side of intellectual progress tlirough the sys'em of 
public instruction. In his early manhood he de- 
pended upon the trade of cabinet-making for a 
livelihood, continuing in that work until 18-57', 
v.dien he secured employment at faria labor by the 
month. As he was still but a boy, his wag^s were 
small, but he displayed fidelity and industry a" 
gradually as his worth became recognized his wages 
were increased. He possessed, moreover, laudable 
am'iition ana firm purpose, and as the years have 
passed he has made steady advancement iii busi- 
ness circles until he is today classed vs-ith the pros- 
perous farmers of his adopted counn-. When his 
capital was sufficient to justify the purcl-ase of 
.land he became the owner of a small tract, to which 
he has added from time to time a- his financial 
resources have increased, until his holdings in farm 
land comprises three hundred and sixty acres, val- 
ued at about two hundred dollars per acre. He 
purchased forty acres in the village of Arlington, 
on which he now has his home, and for this Iract 
he paid one hundred dollars per acre over twenty- 
four years ago. He erected his own residence, and 
it is a comfortable and attractive one. pl-asantly 
situated and surroundcl by a fine grove of shade 
and ornamental trees. There are various well kept 
buildings upon the place, and nearness and thrift 
pervade his farm in every department. He is now 
one of the prosperous agriculturists of the county, 
and in addition to the cultivation of cer(-;'.!3 best 
adanted to soil and climate he also breeds Hainble- 
tonian trotiini: horses and Gallouav cat:le. He 



MS 



]'A.ST AND PlIKSKXT OF I'.rKH.M' rOlWJ'V. 



likewise raises liogs to some extent, aiiJ his livu- 
stock interests are no unimportant part of liis 
business. 

On the -1th of Marcli, 1SC7, was celebrated the 
marriage of ^Ir. Dwyer and Miss Joluinna Dee, 
who was born in April, 1S46, and is a daughter of 
James and Annie (Burke) Dee, natives of Ire- 
land. Mrs. Dwyer was brouglit to tlie United States 
when but two years of age, her parents having 
died on the Emerald Isle. Jn this country slie was 
reared to womauhood, and by her marriage she 
has become the mother of eiglit children: Dennis, 
John A.. :\[ary, I':mily, Elizabeth, William, 
George and Catherine. Mr. and ilrs. Dwyer are 
giving to their children good educational advan- 
tages, thereby fitting them for life's practical and 
responsible duties. They have one son, wlio is a 
graduate of Niagara I'niversity, at Buffalo. Xew 
York, after which he followed teaching for atmiit a 
year, while subsequently he has engaged in mer- 
chandising in the village of Cherry, Bureau county. 

Both Jlr. and 3Irs. Dwyer are communicants of 
the Catholic cliureh. His political sup[)ort is given 
to the democracy, and his fellow-townsmen, rce- 
ogaizing his worth and ability, have frequently 
called him to public office. For four years he served 
as supervisor, and for ten years he has been a 
trustee of tlie village of Arlington. His home is 
within the corporation limits of the town, and his 
farming interests are in Westficld township. All 
that he possesses has been obtained through liis 
own eft'orts, and as the architect of his own for- 
tunes he has builded wisely and well. lie early 
realized the value of perseverance and industry as 
essential factors in a successful career, and thmigh 
he has met some difTiculties and obstacles in his 
path he has made steady progress toward the goal 
of prosperity by r'^ason of his keen business dis- 
crimination, by unabating energy and industry 
that never flags. 



FRANK WAIH). 

Frank Ward, wlio for tweutv-two v.-ars has tii- 
gaged m the live stock business, and' is the olde-t 
buyer in Tiskilwa, was born in Suliiv.in Lounty, 
Xew York, April 0, lS4fi, and bs a son of Henry 
and Eliza (Broadhead) Ward, who spent tlicir en- 
tire lives in the Empire state, Tlie Ward family is 
an old one in Bureau county and tlie ancestry may 
be traced back to colonial days, while representa- 
tives of the name served in the Revolutionary war. 

Frank Ward was reared in Xew York and pur- 
sued his education in the subscription schools such 
as were common at that time, Wisliing to see the 
country, es[)pcially in tlie west, he came to Illi- 
nois alone in the fall of ISfiT, when a young man 
of twenty-one years, lie subsequently went to 
Nebraska and after spending one year in that state 
he returned to Illinois, settling in Bureau countv. 



For .s(ime }ears 1m' engaged in farming iu Milo 
town.-hip, lirii.miiig owner of a tract of land of 
one hundicd ami twenty acres, which he cultivated 
and impio\ed, transforming it into a fine farm. 
'J'he fields lirought forth rich crops in return for the 
care and labor he bestowed upon them and he also 
successfully raised stock. In ISSl lie removed to 
Tiskilwa and in 1S8C lie sold his farm in ililo 
towiisliip, but has since owned several other good 
farms. For the past tuenty-two years — since com- 
ing to Tiskilwa — he has engaged extensively in 
the live stock business and is the oldest stock 
buyer of this town. His operations have been ex- 
tensive and have been profitably conducted, owing 
to his business cnterpri.se, his correct judgment of 
the value of stock and his judicious sales. 

.Mr. Ward was married to Miss Judith A. Ed- 
minster, a daughter of Orange Edminster, one of 
the early settlers of Tiskilwa.' Two children grace 
this marriage: Ada, now the wife of Bcrnhard 
Steinle, of Tiskilwa, and Clay, at home. Mr. 
Ward has a nice home, which is especially attrac- 
tive by reason of its warm-hearted and gracious 
hospitality. Politically Mr. Ward is a democrat 
and his social relati.in- connect him witli Tiskilwa 
lodge. No. S.'iO, A. F. i.*;.' A. M., while in Princeton 
he lias attained the Kniglil Templar degree of ^la- 
sonry. He is free from ostentation or display and 
is a man of genuine personal worth, whose many 
good qualities have made him popular wnth his 
f.'linu citizen.. 



CAPL.l, PIKKCE. 

Carl J. Pierce is one of the enterprising young 
fanners of I'.ureau covin ty, his birth having oc- 
curred ,Viigust II, is:-.', upon tile farm in I'-eilin 
township, upon whieli he' still makes his home. His 
paternal irrandfatlier, Nathaniel Pierce, took up 
his abode' upon this farm iu IS!',', wlien Bureau 
county was yet largely a pioneer district. The 
land had passed into possession of James A. 
Pierce, father of our subject, in ISIT, and became 
tlie property of the present owner in 190-5, so that 
it has remained continuou.sly in possession of the 
family for more than six decades. James A. 
Pierce was born in Greene county. New York, in 
IS-.M, and, having arrived at vcars af maturity, 
was married to ^Miss Marv J. Perry, who wa^ 
liorn in P.elmont county, Ohio. January 1, 1S;!:V 
Tl'c fatlier liad been previously married, his first 
uniim beins: with Esther Green, by whom he had 
two dauHiters. Ann E., now the wife of William 
Booth, and Mil.lred E„ tlic wife of W. .S. Mtirtin. 
Bv the marritige of James .V. Pierce and ^Mary 
J." Perrv there were born the following named: 
.mierhurn. James A., Mrs. Jessie P, Garwood. 
Ei.dnev E.. I.ouis L., Olive B.. Marv L., Carl J. 
and David H. 

Carl J.. Pierce, reared upon his father's farm. 
acquired bis earlv education in the di=trict school^ 



I'AyT AM) i'i;i;si:\T uf ju-kkat rorxTV 



an.l iiftrrwanl aUeiuled ])over Aviukuxy, wink- his 
ciluc.-ition was cuiiiplcted iu the Xortlicni Juduiiui 
Xnnual school, at S'alparai-o. Tlie occupatinn to 
which he was reared he has made hi.-; lil'e work, and 
in 1905 he came into possession of the old humo- 
stead farm, haviug here one hundred and tliirty 
acres of land, wliicli is very productive, re-pondmg 
readily to the care and labor bestowed upon it. 
Here he raises horses, Durham cattle and Poland 
China hogs to some extent, while his fields produce 
large crops of the various cereals best adapted to 
soil and climate. Everytliing about his place is 
kept in excellent condition and the farm presents 
a neat and thrifty appearance. 

On the 2Gth of September. 1803, Mr. Pierce w:u 
united in marriage to !Miss Arloa E. Spaulding, 
who was born in Ijee county, Illinois. Jtay 4, 1ST3. 
'J'iieir children are: Verna E., born Julv 14. 1804, 
and Eugene H., August 7, 1901. :\Ir". and IMr.. 
Pierce hold mcmberslii]) with the C'ongregatioiinl 
church at Dover and take an active part in its 
work and contribute generously to its support. 
^Ir. Pierce has served as one of its trustees for ten 
years and has also filled the office of deacon. His 
political allegiance is given to the republican party 
and he has been collector of his township and di- 
rector of the school board. lie takes an interest 
in political qnestions and issues as every Ameri- 
can citizen .=hould do. and he keeps well informed 
on the political situation of the countrv. He be- 
longs to Crystal Fount lodge. Xo. .=i47, I. 0. 0. 
F.. at ^lalden. and in his life exemplifies its benefi- 
cent spirit. He is a young man of enterprise and 
energy, well known in the county, where his entire 
life has been jnissed and where he has so directed 
his labors a^ to win recognition as a leading and 
wortliv citizen. 



HECTOR CEPM.VTX. 
Among the re]iresenlativcs of agricultural inter- 
ests in Bureau county who have been enalib d to 
put aside the more active and arduous duties of 
the farm, is numbered Hector Germain, who is 
now residing in AVyanei. He is one of Hlinois" 
native sons, his birth lia^ing occurred near Elgin, 
on the 14th of February. 1840. His father. James 
Germain, came from England to the new world 
and died about 1842. The son was educated in 
Elgin and came to P>ureau county in 1S54. when 
fourteen years of age. at which time he settled in 
Bureau county. Although then but a young lad 
he had previously been working at a salary of six 
dollars per month herding sheep. Owing to his 
father's death he was early thrown upon his oun 
resources and whatever success Iir has arhirved 
is the direct reward of his earnesr and persistent 
labors. He was employed in this coutdv imii! 
18G0, when he went to'Pike's Peak in se'uvh of 
gold and he was in Omaha. Xebraska. when rh,- 
ground was i)roken for the I'nion I'^cifu Pail- 



braska from ISiil until isi;-.', and i,niaii!.-d in the 
west altogether for fifteen v.ais. II,. ndisted in 
the militia and served during isii:; and lS(;i, and 
in Sei^tcinbrr of the latter year he re-enlisted, this 
time iHvoniing a member of Companv 1, Fourth 
Colorado Cavalry, with which he was connected 
until after the close of the war in .lulv, ISC.".. Ho 
was on detailed duty, guarding mail n)iites and in 
other such service. 

ilr. Germain then follourd th,. Fnion Pa. i lie 
Railroad as it was being built westward, buying 
and selling town ju-operiy and keeping pace with 
tlie construction. He would go ahead'of the rail- 
road, buy and build, and when the place would be 
at the height of its boom he would sell and again 
move forward. He always made good money on 
his investments during those times." In the niean- 
tiine. however, lie engaged in the livery and feed 
business in Georgetown "and iu Black ifawk, Colo- 
rado. His brother managed his interests in that 
state while Hector Germain was buying and sell- 
ing town bits along the liiu\s of the Union Pacific. 
He went through the usual exi)eriences and hard- 
slii[is of frontier life, roughing it in the west until 
is:.:;, when he sold out and" returned to Bureau 
county. He juirchased land lien^ in l.s;;i. and 
for two years he bought and sldpiied brood marcs 
to Colorado. He still carries on business interests 
in the latter state. When he returned to Bureau 
county in 187.3 lie located iu Wyanet township on 
one hundred and sixty acres of land, two miles 
east of the villaire of Wvanet. which propertv lie 
still owns. He has alwa\'s fed tlie products of his 
farm to cattle and hogs and is well known a; a 
stock-raiser. In December. 1004. however, he re- 
tired from active busine.-s life and removed to the 
village of Wvanet. where he built a beautiful resi- 
dence, whicli he now occupies. He now has two 
lots, giving him a frontage of one hundred feet. 

Mr. Germain wa^ married in 1873 to :^nss Pliila 
Hart, who was born in Ohio and is a daughter of 
Andrew Han. who enlisted in the army from 
Peoria, Illinoi.;, and served for four vears'durins 
the Civil war. He resided near Tiskilwa for sev" 
eral years and his death occurred about ISOG. 
Unto llr. and ]\Irs. (Icrmain have been born three 
children: Cliarles. who married Mary Mourit, a 
daugliter of I'.li-ha .1. :Moiint, their 'iuune liein^' 
on his father's farm : Gertrude, the wife of Flmer 
Wheeler, of Ottawa, Illinois; and Gale, who is liv- 
ing at home. 

The parents are mendiers of the Methodist 
church and 'Mr. Germain was a member of the Odd 
Fellows lodu'e in Colorado. becomiuLr a charter 
mend.er of the first lodge organized at Black 
Hawk. In p.ilitiral views lie is a stalwart repub- 
liean and be earrie.l a tor,h light at the organiza- 
tion of thi^ party in I'^v;. wlie". Fremout^vas a 
candidate for thi- presidency. He has always been 
deeply interested in the success of the j>ar(y and 
upon its ticket was elected and served as highway 



I'AST AND I'EESILNT OP EUKKAU COUXTV. 



He has 



conn 

for tuflvo vcius ;iu 

discharged with pro 

net, where he is widely known, h 



Iso been seh.,ol triLslee 

itlicial duties have been 

tpness and fidelity. In 'W'ya- 

is esteemed as a 



man of generous impulses, high personal worth 
and splendid business ability. He owes his sue- 
cess to his own labors and though lie has led a busy 
life he has found time for consideration for his 
fellowmen, being generous and kindly, his good 
qualities winning him the esteem of those with 
whom he has been associated. 



}!K_\.iA.Mix r. r.Asn. 

.Benjamin F. Eash, who is largely engaged iu 
raising and fattening stock for the market, resides 
upon a farm in La Moille township. He was born 
January 10, 1S5G, in Morrow county, Ohio, and 
came to Bureau county with his parents in 1SG5. 
He is the ninth in order of birth in a family of 
eleven children born unto David and Catherine 
(Shoop) Bash, both of whom were nati\es of 
Pennsylvania, the father born in June, 1S13, and 
the mother in ISIT. They have now passed away. 
Benjamin F. Basli was educated in the public 
schools of Bureau county and in "Western College 
m Iowa. Ho was but nine years of a^c when he 
accompanied his parents to Bureau c^ounty, and 
here he was reared to farm life. Ou leaving school 
he took up farming as a life occupation, and has 
always followed that pursuit, being today the 
owner of two hundred and fortv-two acres of 
e.xcellent land, which is valued at the hiahesi 
market price for land in this loealitv. Theiv is 
a good gas well on the farm, of sixteen pounds 
pressure. Mr. Bash is well known as a promi- 
nent stockman, not only feeding all of the products 
of his own fields to his stock but also buying large 
quantities of feed for purpose of fattening stock 
for the market. In ISSS he purchased the home 
farni, on which he has lived continuously since, 
and it is a valuable property, equipped with manv 
modern conveniences. He paid tliirty-two dollars 
per acre for the land and it is today worth from 
one hundred and fifty to two hundred dollars per 
acre. In the care and improvement of the prop- 
erty he has displayed good management, and 
through his own labors has brought it under its 
present high state of cultivation. He has erected 
the buildings and planted trees which today have 
grown into fine shade trees, forming an attractive 
ornament to the place. An air of genialitv and 
good cheer pervades the home, and the fa'rm is 
regarded as a model property, indicating in its 
neat and thrifty appearance the care and super- 
vision of the owner. 

Mr. Ba.>h was married Januarv S-?, l^SO t-o 
Miss Bertha IJ. Eddv. who was born Aucjust 11, 
1S:.5. in I'rrslo,,. ^finnesota, a daughter of Shel- 
don and ^rary (Kddv) Kdrlv. The father was a 



native ol \,.w York and became a resident of Lee 
count}, lllmois, m Itl-JO, when but ten years of 
age. He was married in Minuestola iu 1SD.5 to 
Jtiss Maiy Eddy, and unto this union there were 
eight children, of whom ilrs. Bash is the eldest. 
Her iather is still living, but her mother passed 
away Januury 20, lS9y. Unto ilr. and Mrs. 
Bash have been born two children: iirs Ethel 
K. Field; and C. MiUicent Bash, now at home. 
Ihrre are also two grand.hildren : Frank Lester 
and J;,,!„.rt Ki„ris„u FirM. the former born Janu- 
ary S, liMji. and the hitler March 1.5, 190G. 

Mr. Bash votes with the republican party, and 
he and his wife are meiiibt-rs of the Baptist church, 
in the work of which they take an active and help- 
ful part. He is also a factor in political circles, 
has served as a member of the republican town- 
ship central committee and has held the office of 
justice of the peace. In the church he has acted 
as trustee and as superintendent of the Sundav- 
school, and he is likewise president of the Citizens" 
Memorial Society. The various duties which de- 
volve upon him in tliese connections are promptlv 
and faithfully performed, and he is likewise presi- 
dent of the IJced Drug Company and one of its 
directors. He is a man of high character and in- 
telligence, who, in the race of life, has forged 
ahead by reason of his industry and intcijritv. 
Both he and his wife are held in the highest es- 
teem by all who know them, and Mr. Bash is rec- 
ognized as a man of genuine personal worth, who 
in his public and private relations manifests those 



sterling 


traits 


awaken 


respi'ct 



which in every land 
and confidence. 



md cli 



TE^IPLKTON. 

public record has 



JAMES 
James W. Tempi 
been distinguished by all that marks the publi 
spirited citizen who has been a student of possi- 
bilities for general progress and development and 
in his otTicial service has labored not alone for 
present needs, but has looked beyond the e.xigen- 
cies of the moment to the possibilities of the° fu- 
ture, dates his residence in Princeton from 1S(',3. 
He was born iu St. Clairsvillo, Belmont county, 
Ohio, and for forty-three years has been a prom"i- 
nent factor in the history "of the city in wbieh he 
now makes his home. 

Mr. Tenipleton liad resided here for only a brief 
period when his fellow-townsmen gave evidence 
of their recognition of his ability and trustworthi- 
ness by calling him to public office. He was - 
pointed deputy ci.uuty clerk and served from lSfi-1 
until ISGD. when he was elected county clerk for 
a four years' term. In April, 1S:.5. he received 
presidential appointment to the office of postmas- 
ter of Princeton, and acted in tliat capacitv fur 
twelve vears. He was elected to the state senate 
m ISni and was re-elccte<l in ISPS and 1902. mak- 
ing twelve years of faithful .service in the upper 




ifHS. j;. i\ HASH. 



PAST ANJJ ]'i:i;SKNT OF lUJKEAU C'l 



7o5 



liouso uf the j^i'iieral nssombly. His rfjnitatiou for 
iiite^'rity auJ ability is state wide. If any measure 
of a doTibtful cliaractor is to be forwarded, Senator 
Tciiipleton is not consulted, as it has been gencr- 
allv kno\sn throiigli his long service that lie is not 
in the senate for that, purpose; but when any meas- 
ure is presented that has for its aim the better- 
ment of the connnonwealth, then his good judg- 
nicnt and broad experience are sought, a fact for 
■which he and his friends may be justly proud. His 
record in office shows capable public service, re- 
sulting from a thorough understaiuling of the po- 
litical situation of the corintry and a broad knowl- 
edge of the questions whicli are afTected by the 
state government and hear upon the issues of the 
people. He was appointed president of the Pan- 
American commission by Governor Yates to build 
the Hlinois building at tlic Pan-American Expo- 
sition, the state appropriating seventy-five thou- 
sand dollars for that purpose, of which amount 
Mr. Tcmpleton returned twenty thousand dollars 
as not needed — a very unusual occurrence. 

On the 21st of December, 1S70, Mr, Templcton 
was married to Miss ^fandana il. Stevens, a 
daughter of Justus Stevens, of Princeton, and 
two children gladden their home: Stephen and 
Gladys. Mr. Templeton is a man whose breadth 
of view and liberal education, which has been ac- 
quired through researcli and study of the prob- 
lems and issues of the day, have made him a leader 
of public thought and action, and no man in the 
cominunitv is hold in hiirhiT rciravd. 



WILLIAM A. VAN SICKLE. 
William A. A^an Sickle is the owner of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of good farming land in ;^Ta- 
con township, upon which he located in 1894. He 
was born in Stark county, Illinois, ;^^ay 22, lS6-"i, 
and acquired a public-school education while 
spending his boyhood days in the home of his par- 
ents, Aaron B." and llary (Kelley) Van Sickle. 
The father was born in New Jersey in 1830, while 
the mother's birth occurred in Ireland. He was 
one of the pioneer settlers of Stark couTity, where 
he first worked at a salary of ninety dollars per 
year. He lived frugally and economically, and as the 
result of his diligence and perseverance at length 
obtained the money with which he purchased one 
hundred and sixty acres of land. Pie th.en began 
farming on his own account, built a home and 
successfully and energetically carried on general 
agricultural pursuits until 1901, when he retired 
from active business life and is now living in Tou- 
lon. His wife, however, passed away when forty- 
seven years of age. He has filled the ofiices of 
school director and road commissioner, and in pol- 
itics is an earnest republican. In the family were 
four children: Harriet, the wife of William A. 
Barr; George, who married Ellen Scheat^ : Jose- 
phine, the wife of Robert Laing. and William A. 



The father was one of the pioneer settlers ul' this 
part of the state, where he has always resided .-ince 
coming to the west, and during the period of his 
residence here he has watched many notable 
changes that have brought about the present prog- 
ress and prosperity of the localitv. 

William A. Van Sickle, reared to farm life, early 
became familiar with the duties and labors that 
fall to the lot of the agriculturist. Soon after his 
marriage, which was celebrated January 1. 1SS9, 
he began farming on his own account, and in 1894 
removed to Bureau county, where he purchasea 
one luindred and sixty acres of land, on which he 
has erected a fine residence. Here he has tiUei the 
soil and raised stock, shipping from one to two 
carloads of hogs to the Chicago market each year. 
He also breeds his own Xorman draft horsts," and 
altogether has a well improved farm property. 

On the 1st of January, 1SS9, :Mr. Van Sickle 
was joined in wedlock to ^^iss Alma Wiby. \\-ho 
was born in Stark countv, IlliiK.iis. A].ril ■.'. lbG7, 
a daughter of John and Sarah (Atm) Wih y. Her 
fatlier, who was born in New Jersey in 1>32. 
now living in Stark county, Illinois. Her ii;other 
was born in the Buckeye state and died at 'Le age 
of forty-five years, ilr. Wiley came to Illinois when 
a young man, settling in Stark county arjid its 
pioneer residents, and there he has made his home 
for the past half century. He bought botli timber 
and prairie land, and he also built a honic. He 
has kept his farm in touch with the modern ideas 
of progress, and is today the owner of about five 
hundred acres of very valuable land devoted to 
general farming. He has served as school director 
and in other local offices, and his political allegi- 
ance is given to the republican party. He likewise 
belongs to the Christian church. Unto him and 
his wife were born five children, namely : Mrs. 
"V'an Sickle ; Ira L. : Edward T., who married 
Tillic Nelson; Emma T., the wife of Frei". Sweet, 
and Clara, the wife of Clayton Egbert. 

The home of Mr. and Jrrs. Van Sickle has been 
bles.-ed with two children: Lula Leota, born in 
1892, and Floyd Wiley, in 1S06. Mr. Van Sickle 
is a republican, and, while never seeking office, he 
yet is deeply interested in the success of his party 
because he "believes its principles are most condu- 
cive to good government. He is a representative 
citizen of the middle west, pos.=essing the spirit of 
enterprise which has been the dominant factor in 
the rapid and substantia! growth of this section 
of the state. 



(■HAIILES W. COLKM.VN'. 
Charles W. Colrman. interc^tr.i lu i:en. :;•! farm- 
ing, has resided at his jiresent honv- for more than 
a half century. He was born in Portag:- county, 
Ohio. October 1, 1?.'^3, and i- a .«nn of Watson and 
Harriet (Grav) Coleman. His education uas ob- 
tained in tlie public schools of his native ^-ate, and 



PAST AND pi;i-: 



j'.ri;i;Ar corxTV, 



after pultiuy ii<ule lii> t'.'xt-bunk.s he uoiked in ;i 
d;ury until lie eanie to Bureau county. He re- 
moved I'roni Clark county, Ohio, to Illinois in 
185-1, and here started in business lii'e upon rented 
farms. In 1.SG4 he purchased his present farm, 
after living upon it as a renter for ten years, and 
tlie place has therefore been his home for more 
tlian a half century. Here he has one hundred and 
twenty acres of well improved land that returns 
golden harvests in reward for tlie care and labor 
lie bestows upon the fields. He also owns one hun- 
dred and sixty acres in Iowa. In this county arc 
his well tilled fields, carefully cultivated after ap- 
proved modern methods of farming, and he uses 
tlic latest machinery in carrying on the work of the 
fields, iforeovcr, he brings to bear practical com- 
mon sense in all of his work, and as a resTilt he 
has been enabled to add to his capital year by year. 

On the 24th of August, 18-32, Mr. Coleman" was 
married to Miss Emily ^Miller, of Clark county, 
Ohio, who was there reared, her parents being 
Aaron and Jane (Smith) ililler, the former a 
farmer by occupation. After a little less than tv.-o 
years' residence in Clark county the young couple 
started westward, and, as before stated, they be- 
came residents of Bureau county in 1S54. They 
have ah^ays resided on their present homestead, 
and as the years have passed their marriage has 
been blessed with eiglit living children, while three 
of the family have passed away, these being: AVill- 
iam, who died wdieu a year old, and two who died 
in infancy. The eight who still survive are: Mary 
Ann, who is the wife of Mason Utriiie. a resident 
farmer of South Dakota ; Horace G., who married 
Emma Hewitt and follows farming in Emmet 
county, Iowa; Sarah Jane, the wife of Oliver A'au 
Ormer, a farmer of Charles ilix county,' South 
Dakota; Jerome X., wdio married Anna Hart-/ and 
is a farmer of Carroll county, Iowa, where lie owns 
one thou.sand acp's of land ; Ida E., the wife of 
Rufus F. Lathrop. wlio is conducting a livery and 
sale stable in Glidden, Iowa; Hattie E., the wife 
of Charles E. Hite, a resident farmer of Emmet 
county, Iowa; Julia, the wife of H. F. Caskcy, a 
grain merchant of La Salle, Illinois, and Lizzie 
G., the wife of George Pittnian, of ^lanlius. 

The family attend the United Brethren church, 
and are people of high respectability, enjoying tlic 
friendship and regard of many witli whom they 
have been associated. l[r. Coleman is a republican, 
but witliout aspiration for office. In addition to 
his farming interests he is a stockholder in the 
First State Bank at :\ranlius. He has lived in Bu- 
reau co\iuty for fifty-two years, wdiile his life rec- 
ord covers seventy-three years. Here ho has so di- 
rected his labors and guided his conduct by ujj- 
right principles that he has won the goodwill of 
his fellowmen, and is today numbered among the 
honored early settlers. He is largely familiar with 
the history of the county during the greatest ]"'- 
riod of its progress and (h»vclo[inient. for when h.' 
came here there were still evidences of fmnticr life 



m the uneullival. d li'aels of land and in the primi- 
tive homos. .\s time has gone by he has rejoiced in 
the progress whieh lias transformed the county, 
borne his full share in the work of public 
'iiicnt. 



d h; 



JACOi; ATTKi. 

Modern method- of farming are employed by 
Jacob Attig in the care and improvement of his 
farm, which is an e.vcellent property of two hun- 
dred and fifty aeres in Walnut township, valued at 
one hundred dollars per acre. There are good 
buildings upon the place and the well tilled fields 
are proof of earnest, enterprising labor. 

Mr. Attig is a native of Woodford county, Illi- 
nois, born December 22, 1858, a son of' Jacob 
and Mary Altig. natives of Germany. They were 
married in Woodford county, Illinois, where they 
located at an early day, and the mother died when 
her son Jacob was only a year and a half old. The 
father continued to engage in farming for many 
years and made his home in that county until his 
death, in Xovember, 1S9S. He came to" this coun- 
try a poor man, hoping to benefit by the broader 
business opportunities of the new world, and at 
the time of his death he was the owner of a good 
farm of one liundred and forty acres. 

The district schools of his native county af- 
forded to Jacob Attig the educational privileges, 
he enjoyed and lie was trained to the work of tlie 
farm, for at an early age he took his place behind 
the plow and also assisted in the task of planting 
and of harvesting. Ambitious to gain a good liv- 
ing for himself and family, he has labored untiring 
and persistently and as liis financial resources have 
increased he has invested in choice farming projier- 
ty, owning now two hundred and fifty acre? in 
one body in Walnut townsliip, worth on an aver- 
age more than a hundred dollars per acre. He 
keeps good grades of stock, including sliorthorn 
cattle and Poland China hogs, but his attention is 
given chiefly to the cultivation of the cereals best 
adapted to soil and climate. The buildings are 
commodious and substtniti:d and are kejit in sood 
repair, and the farm is well tiled. 

On the Ifitli of Febniarv. 1S8G, Mr. Attii: was 
married to ^fiss Sarah Twig, who was born. March 
13. ISnn. a daughter of Jacob and :Mary (Smith') 
Iwiir. the former a native of Germanv and the 
latter of the state of Ohio. Thov were farming 
people and for many vears resided in Woodford 
countv, Illinois, ^fr. and ^[rs. Attig have become 
the parents of four children, of whom Harvey R.. 
the third in order of birth, died in infancv. The 
others are Chester J., Alma ^f. and Lilah P.. aged 
resiH^ctividv nineteen, fifteen and eleven voars, and 
nil vet at liomo. The .^on was graduated from the 
Walnut high school at the ajre of sixteen, winnins: 
the boinT- of his class. r)i'.rinir the summers he 
assiste.I l>is father on the farm and on,* vear sub- 



PAST Axi) j'i;i;si:.\'j' of r.niKAU cuin'J'v 



S('<juent to tliL' cuiujiletion of his cuurst,' in Walnut 
he niatiicuhitcd in Northwestern college, at A'a- 
pervillc, Illinois. He is now in the junior year, 
pursuing the seientilic course, and will graduate 
witli the class of IDOS. Alma is now a sophomore 
in the high school at Walnut, while tiie younger 
daughter is yet attending the district schools. 

Jlr. Attig and his family are nienihi'rs of the 
Evangelical church at Red Oak, and his political 
support is given to the republican party. The 
honors and emoluments of ofliee have no attrac- 
tion for him, however, as his ambition centers in 
his familv and his business, utilizing the latter 
that he m-n- provide a gnod home a!id the comforts 
of life for hi- wilV and children. 



ASA W. KASBEEH. 

Asa W. Kasbcer, owuiug and operating one hun- 
dred and forty-six acres of valuable land in Ohii> 
township. Bureau county, and also the owner of 
a fine farm of one luindrcd and sixty acres in Al- 
len county, Kansas, is a native son of the county 
in which he makes his home, his birth having oc- 
curred December 28, lSo"2. ?Ie is a son of J. S. 
and Hannali (Eoss) Kasliccr, the former born in 
Tuscarawas county, Ohio, Decemlior 2S, ]S1S, and 
the latter in 1S.3G, aiul both still survive. In their 
family -n-ere twelve children, of whom eight are 
living, while four have passed away. 

Asa W. Kasbcer, the fifth member of his father's 
family, was educated in the public schools of Bu- 
reau county, and after putting aside lii,= text- 
books, started out upon his own rc=[ionsi!)iliiy. 
He has been very successfid in nil his undertak- 
ings and is now the owner of one hundred and for- 
ty-six acres of land situated in Ohio township. 
Part of this property was inherited by him, but 
he has added all of tlie improvements and acces- 
sories, tluis enhancing its value until it is today 
worth from one hundred and fifty to two hundred 
dollars per acre, while it was wcu'th but fifty dol- 
lars jier acre when it came into liis possession. On 
this tract are found modern and substantial build- 
ings and all the conveniences of a model farm. 
He has also set out many shade trees, which add 
to the attractive appearance of the place and show 
the owner to be proirressive in tin' conduct of bis 
biisiness interests. He has all the latest improved 
farm niacbinerv to facilitate bis work and ex- 
ercises excellent ability in all that he umlertakes. 
Beside this tract of land ho is the owner of one 
hundred and sixtv acres of valuable farminaj land 
in Allen countv. Kansas, wdiich he has improved 
until it ba^ di.ub'ed in value since it came into hi- 
po—e-^ion. 

^[r. Kasbecr was united in marriage to ^liss 
Alice if. vStaples. who was born in London. Eng- 
land, on the 1-ltli of April. ISM. a dauirhter of 
John and .Vnn.'p ( Erech) Staides, both native, of 
that countrv. Mr-. Ka^beer aeeompanii^l her par- 



ent.- on their cmigralin,, fnmi Knglaud to America 
in .May, l.Si;:i. '\■U,■^ lirst .-ettled at Cedar Kapid.s, 
Jowa. will IT till \ ivioaii^ d for only about a month, 
and tlui! ma.le llu.'ir wav u. Bureau counlv, Illi- 
nois, where the daughter wa< reared and educated, 
completing her high .school education in Princeton, 
and after reaching womanhood gave her hand in 
marriage to the subject of this review, the wedding 
ceremony being i)errormed on the 8th of March, 
18S2. The father is still living, but the mother 
passed away on the 23d of NovendxT, lSO-1. In 
their family were five sons and si.\ daughters, of 
whom two are deceased, Mrs. Kasbcer being the 
fourth in order of birth. 

Unto our sul)jeet and hi,- « ifo have beni born five 
children, as follows: Walter 1!., born Man-b l.j, 
1883; Louie B., July 13, LSjiJ ; Arthur P., March 
20, ISSG, and now deceased; Nellie M., September 
5, ISST, and James A., born October 2U, If^Hi. Po- 
litically Jlr. ]\asbeer is a republican and he and 
his family are members of the Methodist Protes- 
tant cluirch. He has served as school director 
and is interested in the educational advancc- 
iiunit of bis township and county. He is an en- 
terprising agriculturi-t, following modern meth- 
ods in all his work, and through his industry 
has accomplished excellent results, so that he is 
now the ownci' of extensi\e landed interests both 
in Illinois and Kansas, being classed among the 
substantial and well-to-do agriculturists of Bu- 
reau county. He possesses many excellent traits 
of character which have secured to him many 
business and social friends and he and his esti- 
mable wife are numbered among the most high- 
ly re-pecled jn-..[ile of their community, and are 
iiow enabled to enjoy the luxuries of life. 



JOHN MASON. 

J..l,ii Ma-on. deera^-1, was bm-n in Pcerfield, 
New Haiiip-bire. Jaiuiarv 7. i::<^. \Vhen he was 
but foiir vears of aLf;' hi- fatlier died, and three 
vears later he lost his mother also. He had 
but one sister. Anna Erwen ^lason. who was 
liorn :\lav 2 1. i::i.-|. and died in 18S3, in Con- 
cord. Ni'u- Ilampshii.-, ;uid left one daughter, 
now ^Fr-. ^far\ Blakr. of Concord, New Hamp- 
shin\ Tn e;;rlv life John Ma-i'>n was bound to 
Edinnnd Stevcii-. to learn the tanner and cur- 
rier"- trade, and his lit- was such that he had 
but small opportunitic\- for an education : how- 
ever, he learned to rend and write, and then to 
ci[ili> r. u-ing the hides in the tannery for his 
slate, .\fter serving his time of apprenticeship, 
he Tiever afterward followed his trade, but en- 
gasred in different occunations. Tn 18.1.") he re- 
mov(>d from his then home in Pittsfield, New 
Hamp.-hire. to Illinois, and landed at Pekin. 
June l-T, l^o.'). and five of the family of seven 
had to be carried otT tlio boat to the shore, on ac- 
count of sickness. TTis fir4 settlement was at 



PAST AND ]'I 



;.\'j' OF JU 



■:au cul'xty. 



Black Parlridgr I'oint, in what is now Wood- 
ford couiitv, and the following year, ISoCl, the 
town of .Mi'tiimiira ^va.s laid out on hind adjoin- 
ing Ins farm. Jn ISll he came to Bureau coun- 
tyf and settled at French Grove. That year he 
made brick and the following year built a two- 
storv brick house, which was the first house 
eree'ted on the present site of Buda, and yet re- 
mains and used as a dwelling. In lSl-1 he sold 
this and tlie following year settled the farm now 
owned bv his grand^on, Orris W. ilason, and 
it was th-fre he met his death Jlay 5, 18G0. He 
was crushed by the falling of a large stone he 
^\-as trying to bury in the field. 

He was married in Canterbury, New Hamp- 
shire, March 7, 1S30, to Abigail l-!obcy, who was 
born at--Pittsfield, Now Plampshire, December 
17, 1793, and died in this county Xovember 
20, lSC-5. She was the mother of the following 
named children: William H., born August 13, 
1821; Abigail A., born February 22, 1823; 
John W., born Mav 27, 1S25; Stephen R., born 
June IS, 1S27, and Cyrus P., born August 13, 
1831. 

William H. Mason married Phebe A. Draw- 
ycr, January 24, 1844. She was born at Car- 
mel, New York, December 29, 1822, and died 
October 29. 18.'.2, at the home in Macon town- 
ship, leaving one son, Hiram Francis, born Xo- 
vember 28, 1844, and died in Denver, Colorado, 
August 2.5, 1874. William Mason's second mar- 
riage was June 27, 18.53, to Mehitable Kaime, 
who was born in Chichester, New Hampshire, 
March 21, 1819, and died at the Mason home, 
October 14, 1886, leaving one son, ^Yilliam K., 
born September 2-1, 18.56. ^vho resides on the 
home farm in ;Macon township, Bureau county. 
His third marriage, ilav 2. 1889, was to ^Irs. 
Ann Elizabeth (Pead) "Phodes. who was born 
November 1.5, 1828, in Providence, Phode Is- 
land, and now resides in Buda, where Mr. Ma- 
son died October 11. 1899. A more extended 
sketch of William K. 'Mason appears elsc^vhere 
in this work. 

Abigail Amanda ilason married Benjamin G. 
Powell ]irav 4, 1843. He was born in Andovcr, 
New Hampshire, May 2, 181.5, and died at his 
home in Barren Grove. June 11, 190C. To 
them were ,'born six children: Lydia Abigail, 
born Januarv 24, 1844. married Pobert Free- 
land, December 21, 1861, died January 15, 
1890. at Mndena. Illinois; John Moses was born 
September 6, 1846, now resides in Oklahoma; 
Henrietta Abigail, born August 22, 1849, mar- 
ried Thaddeus-S. Campbell, April 11, 1867. now 
resides in Xeola, Iowa ; James D. Pobey, born 
Juno 17, 1852, resides in Xepunset. Illiimis; Ben- 
jamin Greeley, born August 27. 18.-,7. resides on 
the home place in !\[ineral town-hi|i, BuriMu coun- 
ty, Illinois; Addie ^1., born March 10, ls64. died 
October 27, 1864. 



John Wesley Mason married Aclisah Braiu- 
ard at Princeton, Illinois, ilarch 19, 1817. She 
was born May 10, 1829, at Westfield, Ohio, and 
now lives with her daughter in Princeton, Illi- 
nois. Thoy were the parents of seven children: 
Dura :\I., "born December 28, 1847, married 
John F. Pobey, in Buda, Illinois, January IS, 
l«;o, now resides in Princeton, Illinois; 
Charles, born May IS, 1849, died October 11, 
1850; Henry Pobey, born September 28, 1852, 
died Xovember 2, 1893 ; a daughter born Septem- 
ber 7. 1857, died in infancy; Albert French, 
born February 10, 1859, resides in Buda, Illi- 
nois; Charles Seymour, boru September 7, 18G2, 
lives at Omaha, Nebraska; George Wesley, born 
August 2, 1864, is in New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Stephen Pobey Mason married Mary Ann 
Brainard June 10, 1852, at Providence, Illinois. 
She was born January 26, 1834. at Lafayette, 
Ohio, died March 24, 1889, at DoYall's BhifE, 
Arkansas. To them were born five children: 
Ella Jane, born ]\rarch 4, 1853, married W^alter 
B. Allen. Julv 26, 1876, died June 30, 1900; 
Ida Mav, born January 16, 1855, married John 
Waterman i^farch 30, 1880, now lives at Cres- 
ton. Iowa; Pobev Ensign, born December 17, 
1856, died July 30, 1888, at Brinkley, Arkan- 
Fas. Wilber Jolm, born X'ovember 22. 1859, 
lives at DeYalFs Bluff, Arkansas; Harry Whit- 
ing, born :\[arch 14, 1863, now resides at Dan- 
ville, Illinois. 

Cyrus Parker ilason (sec separab' sketch) 
married Sarah J. Xoyes in Buda, Illinois, Jan- 
uarv 8, 1860. She was born February 25, 1S33, 
in " Springfield. X""ew Hampshire, and died 
:\rarch 3, 1900, in Buda, Illinois. Their chil- 
dren were Parker Xoyes, (see separate sketch), 
born October 4, 1862', and Orris Wesley, (see 
separate sketch), born June 21, 1864, both resi- 
dents of Buda, llinois. 



JOHN F. CKATKK. 

John F. Crater, now living retired at Xo. 1419 
South Main street, in Princeton, has been a resi- 
dent of Bureau countv since February, 1856. He 
hhd come to the county in the previous August, 
and purchased a farm on what is now known as 
North Prairie, and after taking up his abode 
permanently in the county, about a half century 
aso, he followed famiing for many years, and is 
stfU the owner of good kud, from which he de- 
rives a gratifying income. 

He w-as born in Genuan Valley, Morris county, 
New Jersev. August 24, 1825, his parents being 
Philip and Catherine (Fritts) Crater, the former 
born in Morris county and the latter in Hunterdon 
county. New Jersey. The great-great-grandfather 
i'ritts came from Germany, and was married to a 
ijaii'rhter of the captain on whose vessel ho s.iiled 
to rbe new w..ild. He built the Lutheran church 




JOIIX r. CI^ATEl]. 



PAST A^;i> I'JiKSEN'J' OV BUItKAU COUNTY. 



7(;i 



iu Hunterdon county and was a very proiuiiiinil 
nnd ''n'hu'niial resident there iu an early epoeli 
of the early settlement of ilie state. His son, the 
great-grandfather, was the most prominent factor 
in the building of another cliureh in that eounty. 
and the grandfather also built a eluireh there, so 
thai tiie Fritts family were closely associated with 
the (t'rly moral development of their locality. 

I'hilip Crater, father of our subject, spent liis 
entire life in Xew Jersey, whore he dii^d when only 
thirty-ciglit or thirty-nine years of age. 1". early 
manhood ho engaged in teaching school, and sub- 
sequently ho conducted a store, while later he en- 
gaged in the liotel business until his death. His 
widow long survived him, reaching the advanced 
age of eigliti"-5ix years, passing away about ISSO. 
She had resided in New Jersey throughout her 
entire life, and after the death of lier first husband 
she was married in Somerset county' to Henry I. 
Hoflinan, wlio died some years before her death. 
He was prominent in community affairs in the 
east, and served as Justice of the peace for forty 
or fifty years. 

Mr. Crater, of this review, was one of a family 
of eight children, of whom three sisters are yet 
living: Mrs. Catherine Baker, of Xew York- 
city; Adeline, who also lives in that city, and 
Mrs. ilary Yawger, a widow, who is residing with 
a son in Brooklyn, New Y^ork, at the age of ninety- 
one years. The others are all now deceased, name- 
ly: William, George and Isaac. The last named 
was a photographer, conducting a gallery at Xo. 
55 Clark street, Chicago. 

John F. Crater was reared in Xew Jersey, a<- 
quiring his early education in that state, and lie 
afterward attended Lancaster College, in Easton, 
Pennsylvania. He was thus well equipped by lib- 
eral educational training for life's practical and 
responsible duties. In 18-18 he was nutrried in 
Easton to Miss Elizabeth Xeighbour, the wedding 
ceremony being performed b}- Dr. .Tunkard, who 
was president of Lafayette College and was the 
father-in-law of Stonewall Ja.'kson. ilrs. Crater 
was born in German Valley, Morris county, Xew 
Jersey, in 1S"27. They remained residents of the 
east for about eight years, and, as previously 
stated, took up their abode in Bureau county in 
February, 1S5G. In August, 1855, 'Sir. Crater 
had visited this county and purchased a farm on 
what is now known as X'orth Prairie, but a year 
later he sold that property and bought anoUicr 
tract of raw land in Dover township, which he 
inifiroved, having a farm there of one hundred 
and eighty acres, whioli he placed under a high 
state of cultivation. He erected a residence there 
and resided thereon for sovea years. He then 
again sold out. after which he took up his abode 
in Selby township, where he bought land and car- 
ried on farming for eleven years. He then once 
more sold his farm, and his ne.xt purchase m.ade 
him owner of a tract of land iu Dover township, 
where he lived for seven vears. When he once 



more sold he bought a farm in Princeton township, 
and afterward removed to the city of Princeton, 
where he has lived for twenty-oite years. His 
farm in Princeton was sold to Mi-. AVaddell, after 
which he purchased three hundred and thirty-five 
acres in W hiteside and Henry counties, which he 
now owns, but which he has leased. He visits his 
farm every year, but makes his home in Prince- 
ton. His pro])crty bring,s Inm a good incomCj and 
he is now in \ery comfortable fiiuinei;d circum- 

Lnto Mr. and .Mrs. Crater were born five chil- 
dren, who snrvi\ed the nioUier, her death oc- 
curring about thirty years ago. 'J'hese are: Wil- 
liam X., at home; Jacob A., who died of typhoid 
fever iu California; Kate L., who is the widow 
of Henry Callinan, ami, with her two children, 
resides in Bureau county, Illinois; Luella, the wife 
of John F. Kaufman, a fanner residing si.\ miles 
west of Princeton, and Edward B., a jeweler, of 
Tiskilwa, who married Alice Bryant. For his sec- 
ond wife John F. Crater chose Angeline Xeigh- 
bour, a sister of his first wife, and tlieir only child 
dii'd at the age of three mouths. 

Ill hi. n.>litical views iu early life :\Lr. Crater was 
a llriiry Clay whig, and sujiporl^'J the party until 
its dissolution, when he joined the ranks of the 
new republican party and ha.s since been one of 
its stalwart advocates. He joined the Presby- 
terian church before he was sixteen years of age, 
and has lived a life in consistent harmoTiy with 
its teachings. When a young nuin he followed the 
tailor's trade in Xew York, and he thus prmidcd 
for himself for several }earb jirior to hi- nuuriago. 
Tliioughout his business coiuieetinn with this coun- 
ty he has followed farming, and although he is 
now living retired he is still the owner of valuable 
farming interests. His life has been characterized 
by diligence and perseverance crowned with suc- 
cess. He has, Tuoreover, been a witness of much 
of the development and growth of this county, 
having come to Princeton in pioneer times, and for 
a lialf century he has resided in this county, wit- 
nessing the changes that have occurred and bear- 
ing his full share in the work of ij^i'IummI iinprovc- 
nieiit. 



SHANNOX BOXXELL. 

Shannon Bonnell, an active representative of 
the farming interests of La Moille township, is one 
of the native sons of Pennsylvania. He was born 
October IS, 1852, and the following year was 
brought to Illinois by his parents, Silas and Mary 
A. (Smith) Bonnell. The father was also a native 
of the Keystone state and in the middle of the 
nineteenth century brought his family to Illinois. 
There were nine children, of whom Shannon was 
the fourth in order of birth, 

Jlr. Bonnell of this review was reared to the 
occupation of the farm, early becoming familiar 
with the duties and labors that devolve up.m the 



762 



AM) i'i;i 



IJlvM' COCX'JY. 



agriculturist as lie tills his fields and luuvcsts his 
crops. Wlifii iii.it working at the plow or in the 
cultivation of the tiel<ls Jlr. iioniiell was largely 
engaged in the jiursuil of edueation, being a stu- 
dent in the dislriet seliools near his father's home. 
As he neared man's estate he began thinking of 
estalilishing a home of his own, and as a compan- 
ion and helpmate for life's journey he chose Miss 
Tena Maloy, who was born iu Bartholomew county, 
Indiana, I>eecniber 31, ISoG, and who gave him 
her hand in marriage in Bureau county on the 11th 
of March, 187(5. Her parents were John and 
Laner (Shroyer) Maloy, the former a native of 
Ohio and the latter of Pennsylvania. In their 
family were seven children, five of whom are still 
living, Mrs. Bonnell being tlie eldest. Our sub- 
ject and his wife have three children: Everett S., 
born October 20, 1877; John IL, January 11, 
1879; and Elva A., born December 11, 1S83. 

Tlie family home stands upon a farm of forty 
acres of fine land wdiich is very rich and productive 
and which responds readily to tlie care and labor 
bestowed upon it. Here Mr. Bonnell is engaged 
iu raising hogs, sheep and cattle, and his annual 
sales of stock bring him several hundred dollars. 
He is a man of keen discrimination in his business 
affairs, and all that he possesses lias been acquired 
through his own labor. Both he and his wife are 
members of the Mystic Workers at La iloille, and 
in his political connection he is a republican, ^[r. 
and Mrs. Bonnell also hold inombi'rship in the 
Baptist chureli, and are people of genuine persojial 
worth, whose lives are characterized by many good 
deeds and kindly actions. Their neighbors attest 
their integrity and speak in terms of praise of 
their many good qualities, and the life record of 
Mr. Bonnell, with its successes, is another proof of 
the old adage that honesty is the best policy. 



FRAXKLIX A. FATTEN. 

Franklin A. Patten, who carries on general 
farming and stock-raising, owns and operates a 
farm of eighty acres of fine land in ^lacui town- 
ship, and in 1901 erected thereon a new resi- 
dence. He was born near Skowh'.-gaii. in Somer- 
set count}", ilaine, October 7. !s4!'. and acquiivd 
a common-scliool education wluic speiiding Iiis 
boyhood days under the parenial roof. He is a 
son of Isaac and Hulda (Squares) Patten, botli 
of whom were natives of Somerset county, Maine. 
The father was born in 1S1.5, and departed this 
life on the SGd of March, 1S9S, at the ago of 
eighty-three years. He was married at Skowhegan, 
Maine, to Mi.-^s Hulda Squares, who died in Au- 
gust, 1S87. They became resid'nt> of Illinois in 
the spring of 1803, and locateil in Macon t iw a- 
ship, where Mr. Patten pureha.sed one hundred 
and twenty acres of land. Throughout his entire 
life he carried on farming and stock-raising, and 
after a residence of more than two decades in this 



county he removed with his wife to Kansas, wiicre 
Mrs. Patten died iu August, 1SS7. He continued 
to reside in the Sunilower state until 1889, when 
he returned to Illinois, spending his remaining 
days here. His political allegiance was given to 
the republican party, and both he and his wife 
were consistent and faithful members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. In their family were five 
children: Mary, Orrin M., Jennie M., Franklin 
A. and ]\Ierey. Tln^ last named died in early 
womanhood. 

Franklin A. Patten spent the first four years of 
his life in the Piue Tree state and then accom- 
panied his parents on their removal westward to 
Bureau county. He was reared to the occupation 
of farming, and has ahvays engaged in the tilling 
of the soil. He had no financial assistance wdien 
he started out in life for himself, but placed his 
dependence upon the safe and substantial qual- 
ities of unremitting diligence and perseverance, 
and with these as a foundation he has built the 
superstructure of his success. He is now farm- 
ing eighty acres of tine land, which is rich and 
productive and returns to him bounteous harvests. 
In 1901 he erected a new residence, and has made 
other substantial improvements upon his farm. 

On the 1-ith of March, 1SS9, Mr. Patten was 
united in marriage to Miss Louise M. Havener, 
who was born iu Henry county, Illinois, November 

29, 18G7, and ib a daughter of Fred and Frcd- 
erieka (Lymplv'e) Havener. The father's birth oc- 
curred in Ambrock, Germany, April -5, ISl-t, while 
his wife was born at Altkinkendof:. near Berlin, 
Germany. They were married in their native 
country on the 14th of Mareh, 1840, and crossed 
the Atlantic from Bremen to New York city on a 
sailing vessel which was eight weeks and three 
days in making the \oyage. They landed in July, 
18G1, and on the 2?d of that nion:h arrived at 
Kewaneo, Illinois. Mr. Havener rer.:ed a farm in 
Henry county, near Annawan, where he remained 
for a year and then removed to Green river, wdiere 
he lived for four years. His entire life was de- 
voted to general agricultural pursuits and the 
raising of stock, and iie passed away November 

30, 1881, wdien about sixty-seven years of age. 
His political support was given to the democracy, 
and he held membership iu the Gennau Lutheran 
church, to which his widow also beloni-s. She still 
survives him, and is n-.w living in Maion township. 
In their family were seven children, nve sons and 
two daughters, but only two are now living: Au- 
gustus, who w^as born in Germany, January .5, 
18.5-3; and Mrs. Patten. 

The home of our subject and his v.ife has been 
blessed with one daughter. Alma M., born .July 
5'). 1S90. For nine years Mr. Patten has been a 
school director, and has done etieciive service in 
behalf of education. He has served as path- 
master, and he gives his political support to the 
republican partv. Fraternally he is connected 
with Neponset fodge, No. 803, A. F. and A. iL 



PAST AND IMil'SK.NT OF IIL'KKAU COUXTY 



He has always stood for progivs; 
lueiil, ami his eH'oits in behalf of 
have been far-ruaehiajr and ulfectiv> 



[UlUlit\ 



HEEBEIiT L. \VIFITING. 

Herbert L. ^\'hiting, who earries on general ag- 
ricultural pursuits on sections l-l and 12, Indian- 
town township, was born in the house which he 
now occupies, September 19, 1S58, and is a rep- 
resentative of one of ihe pioneer families of this 
part of the state. His paternal grandfather, Sam- 
uel AVhiting, was a farmer and contractor ou the 
Erie canal, and at one time was engaged in the 
lumber business on the Genesee river. He was 
born in Connecticut, and his mother, whose maiden 
name was Zilpha JIather, was a lineal descendant 
of Cotton Mather and also a native of Connecticut. 
Samuel "Whiting, Sr., the great-grandfather of our 
subject, was a native of Xew England, and in 
early maidiood served as a soldier in the con- 
tinental army. The AVhitings are of English lin- 
eage, and the family was established in this coun- 
try in early colonial days. 

Lorenzo Dow Whiting, father of our subject, 
was born at Arcadia, Wayne county, Xew York, 
Xovember 17, ISIO, and acquired an academic 
education, after which he became a salesman in a 
mercantile establishment at Olcott, Niagara coun- 
ty, Xew York, wliere he remained until eighteen 
years of age. He came to the west in 1S3S, and 
for four years was engaged in the patent-right 
business in Illinois, after which he returned to the 
Empire state. During the next seven years he 
was engaged in teaching, and also acted as town 
superintendent of schools in Xewfayne, Xiagara 
county, where he likewise filled the office of justice 
of the peace most of the time. In ISfS he re- 
turned to Illinois with his wife and made pur- 
chase of a quarter section of land near Tiskilwa. 
During the first three years of his residence here 
he was engaged in farming and teaching, after 
which he devoted the greater part of his time to his 
agricultural interests, and added to his holdings 
as opportunity offered, until he became the owner 
of sLx hundred acres of valuable land. He was 
an enterprising, wide-awake and active business 
man, and his close application and judicious in- 
vestments constituted the basis of his prosperity. 
He was also a prominent and influential factor in 
public life, and his ability well fitted him for the 
position of leadership which was accorded him. He 
served for five or six years as supervisor of Indian- 
town township, but still higher honors awaited 
hmi, for in 1S6S he was elected to the Illinois 
house of representatives, in ISGO to the consti- 
tutional convention and in 1S"0 to the state sen- 
ate. He was altogether a member of the general 
assemhlv for eighteen years, and left the impress 
of his individuality upon the legislative hi.=tory 
of the state, and was an influential factor in pro"- 



moting couslrurtive measures, in the constitu- 
tioiud convention he was the first to propose the 
insei-tion of a pruvisiou requiring the general 
assendjly to pass laws regulating railroad charges, 
and as senator he was influential in securing the 
passage of the bill which embodied a law against 
unjust discrimination and extortionate charges, 
known as the Granger laws. He was the pro- 
jector of the Hennepin canal scheme and the 
originator of other bills looking to the internal 
improvement of the state, and few men in j)ublic 
life did more effective service for practical im- 
provement and development than :\[r. "Whiting. 
He was the author of several important laws re- 
lating to agriculture, roads and drainage, and the 
bill, which passed and became a law, ceding the 
Illinois and Michigan canal to the United States 
ou certain conditions, liad its authorship in him. 
It is said that no man in the senate possi-ssed 
clearer insight into the exigencies and possibilities 
of a political venture or movement than Mr. 
Whiting or labored more zealously to secure equal 
rights and justice to all classes than did Lorenzo 
Dow Whiting. In ISGO he was among the most 
active in opposing the lake front scheme, whereby 
three railroad corporations sought to possess them- 
selves of the shore line of the outer and future 
harbor of Chicago. In ISrS he led the opposition 
in defeat of senate bill Xo. 114, which was to 
effect the release of a combination of railroads 
from a large amount of the taxes adjudged by the 
courts to be due to the public. His championship 
of nu--asures relating to the producers, and his 
watchfulness of the public interests when assailed 
by special and corporate greed, made him known 
as the "farmer statesman." He was a repub- 
lican of democratic antecedents, and in his official 
service he placed the general good before parti- 
sanship and the welfare of his constituents before 
personal aggrandizement. 

Lorenzo Dow Whiting was first nuirrii.-il in 1^? tG 
to Miss Lucretia C. Clement, of Oneida county, 
Xew York, who died in 1ST2, leaving three chil- 
dren, two sons and a daughter. In 1874 he mar- 
ried iliss Eriphyle Kobinson, of Brooklyn, Xew 
York. 

On conung to Bureau county Mr. Whiting lo- 
cated near "Wyanet, where he resided until fs.T4, 
when he removed to Indiantown township. His 
business connection with this county was that of 
a farmer and stock- raiser, and he carefully con- 
ducted his interests, so that a large measure of 
success resulted from his industry and aide man- 
agement. He died October 10, 1SS9, respected by 
all who knew him. His life was faultless in honor, 
fearless in conduct and stainless in reputation. 
By his first marriage there were throe children, 
of whom Clement A., the eldest, is now a pro- 
fessor in the Pacific school of osteopathy, in Los 
Angeles, California. The daughter, Emily Lil- 
lian, the youngest, is living in Boston, ilassa- 
chusetts, and is a journalist and lady of superior 



7C4 



PAST AND niESENT OF BUREAU COUNTY. 



literary ability. Shu has wriltou several books, 
including Ihc "Life of Kate Fields" and other 
volumes, anil she spends each summer in Euroiie. 
Herbert L. AVhiting, whose name introduces tliis 
record, was reared upon the home farm in Iiuliau- 
town townshi]), and has always resided in Bureau 
county. Tlie occupation with which he became 
familiar in his youth he decided to make his life 
work, and he has since carried on general agricul- 
tural pursuits. He has valuable land holdings of 
two hundred acres, constituting the old homestead. 



HEXIJY HL'BST, SK. 

Among the citizens of foreign birtli Ii\ing in 
Bureau county whose loyalty to AnieriL-a and her 
institutions nuikes them valued residents of this 
locality is Henry Hurst, who was born in Prussia, 
February 13, 1S31, a son of Christian and Caro- 
lina }Iurst. His father, too, was a native of Prus- 
sia but in the nuiternal line Mr. Hurst comes of 
Swedisli descent. He was educated in the public 
schools and after putting aside his text-books he 
learned the masuu"s trade, mastering the business 
of making both brick and stone structures. He 
followed that pursuit until he came to America, 
where he arrived on the 10th of July, 18.59. His 
father was a driver of one of the wagons during 
the Franco-Prussian war. 

The favorable reports which Henry Hurst re- 
ceived concerning America and its opportuaities 
led him to seek his fortune in the United States, 
and after coming to this country he again worked 
at tlie mason's trade. He first settled at Prince- 
ton, where he arrived with just ten cents in his 
pocket, so that necessity demanded immediate em- 
plo}inent. After a brief period, however, he went 
to Iowa, where he remained for two and a half 
years, and while there he erected a schoolhouse and 
many other good buildings. In 1862 he returned 
to Princeton, whore he again worked at his trade, 
while later lie and his step-father rented some land 
and began fanning. Success attended him in this 
venture, so that he was afterward enabled to pur- 
chase land in ilanlius township, which he bought 
at twenty dollars an acre. Since then he has added 
to his farm until he now has three hundred and 
twenty acres, having paid sLxty-two dollars per 
acre for the last land which he bought on section 
13. It is now worth more than one hundred dol- 
lars per acre and in fact is one of the valuable and 
well improved farms of the locality, owing to the 
labor he has bestowed upon it and the natural rise 
in property due to the rapid settlement of the 
state. 

:Mr. Hurst has been married twice. On the lOth 
of January, 18i;3, he w.-d.led Miss August:i Tuhl. 
a native of Prussia, and they became parents of 
four children \\ho are vet living: Clara M., born 
October :, 18G4: llartha. born April S, 1S(m ; Al- 
bert, born Julv IS, 1st;;); and K-ve. born M.-iv 1.5, 



ISTT. They also lost twins, Emma and John, the 
former dying in January, 18T1, and the latter in 
September, 1875. :\rrs." Hurst departed this life 
January 1, 1871', and on the 20th of June, 1880, 
ilr. Hurst married Miss Amelia Kraft, of Wyanet, 
Illinois. They have two children: Ileinrich F., 
born ilarch 24, 1881 ; and Emma F. E., born June 
4, 1887. One of the daughters, Martha, is now 
the wife of Oscar Nelson, a farmer, and has two 
children: Clara, who is a teacher; and Earl, at 
home. One of the sous, Albert Hurst, married 
Miss Elizabeth Hartz, of Gold township, and they 
have four children: Lillie, Chester, Clara and Vir- 
gil. Ileinrich F. Hurst married Miss Nina Hewitt, 
is a farmer of Greenville township and has one 
chilli, Lucile, born in February, 1905. 

Mv. Hurst has served as school director for many 
years and believes in employing competent teach- 
ers and in upholding a high standard of educa- 
tion. He is a republican and is a member of the 
German Lutheran church, of which he has served 
as trustee. He has never had occasion to regret 
his determination to try his fortune in America, 
foi- here he has found the business opportunities he 
has sought and through his persistent and earnest 
labor has advanced steadily toward the goal of 
success and at the same time has gained a good 
home and made many friends, so that altogether 
his residence in America has been a most pleasant 
one and now in the evening of life he has a com- 
petence sufllcient for old ag(\ 



JUDGE J. A. D.WIS. 

Joe A. Davis, county judge of Bureau county, 
whose knowledge of the law and conscientious re- 
gard for the obligations of citizenship well qualify 
him for the duties wdrich devolve upon him in 
connection with the bench, was born in St. Paul, 
Minnesota, February 26, 1864. He is a son and 
only child of John N. and I'osetta A. Davis, who 
settled in Princeton, Illinois, in the fall of 1864. 

In the public schools of Princeton Judge Davis 
acquired his education and on putting aside his 
text-books entered upon a business career as an 
employe in the express office of this city, where 
he renntined for a year. He afterward accepted 
a clerkship in a store and was also a clerk in the 
postofficc. Ambitious to enter upon a profes- 
sional career, however, he chose the law and in 
December, 1885, he began studying in the office 
and under the direction of John Scott. After 
thorough preliminary reading he was admitted to 
the bar in December, 1887, and entered into a 
partnership with his former preceptor, Mr. Scott, 
whirh relation was maintained to the time of Mr. 
.Scotfs death. Judge Davis then practiced alone 
and by appointment served for four years as mas- 
ter in chaneerv of the circuit court of Bureau 
county, Illinois" In December, 1902, he was .-lected 
count.' judge, in whidi po.ijtion hi' is now starving. 



PAST AND 1'];KSJL\T OF JSUIIEAU COL"XTY. 



rco 



Siiuc his admission to the bar W hd.i mijoyod a 
siiecussful and lucrative practice at Prinretun, as 
the result of his iintiriiig laiiors, his ain!)ition, his 
energy and well directed efl'orls. lie has hccn con- 
nected with a nuniher of proniiniiit cas.vs tried in 
the courts of the county and distrii t during his 
connection with the bar and in the trial of a cause 
he possesses superior power in sifting the evidence 
of a case and gathering tlierefrom tliose points 
which carry weight with judge and jury. lie is a 
wise counsellor, an able advocate and his high 
reputation is justly deserved. Since coining to the 
bench he has proved himself an able jurist with 
broail and coniprehensi\e knowledge of the law, 
who in his decisions is strictly fair and impartial, 
standing as. a conservator of justice in an office to 
whicli those 'who are interested in large property 
rights and the settlement of estates must look for 
protection. 

Judge Davis is a republicnn who has always 
taken an active interest in the alTairs of the party 
in state and nation. It is his firm conviction that 
the principles of this party are for the best inter- 
ests of the people and for several years he served 
as secretary of the republican county central rom- 
mittee. 

In IS'M Judge Davis was nnited in marriage to 
Miss Harriet L. Benson, a native of Xew York, 
and they have one daughter, Helen L. Davis. Lay- 
ing aside the cares and responsibilities of his pro- 
fessional career. Judge Davis finds his greatest 
happiness in returning to his home, where his 
leisure hours are largely spent in the companion- 
ship of the members of his own household. Early 
in life displaying a mind eager in the pursuit of 
knowledge, he has embraced the opportunities 
which have come to him and in a profession where 
advancement depends entirely upon individual ef- 
fort he has won a creditable position as attorney 
and jurist. 



JOHN M. SMITH. 

John il. Smith, having extensive business in- 
terests in Ivasbeer, besides owning and super- 
vising a farm of one hundred and fifty-five acres 
iu Ohio township, is a native of Bureau county, 
Illinois, having been born in Ohio towTiship, De- 
cember 20, lSo7, a son of Daniel P. and Piachel 
(Matson) Smith, the former a native of Massa- 
chusetts, and the latter of Harrison county, Ohio. 
The father came to Bureau county in the year 
1831, settling on a farm near Princeton. The 
mother arrived in ISiG, and in this county they 
were married. In their family were thirteen chil- 
dren, of whom nine have passed away, while the 
surviving members, with our subject, are all resi- 
dents of Ohio town.^hip, Bureau couaty. 

John M. Smith was reared and educated in Bu- 
reau county, receiving the advantages afi'orded l)y 
the common schools. After leaving school Mr. 



Smith was cm]. loved at farm labor for many years, 
or until IS'.i.'), when he entered into partnership 
with his father and brother, conducting a general 
mercantile business at Kasbeer under the firm 
st}le of Smith Brothers & Company, one of the 
leading enterprises of the village. 'J'hcy carry on 
a general mercantile business, having by fair deal- 
ing and good business ability l)uilt up a large and 
increasing trade. Besides his interest iu this busi- 
ness Jlr. Smith is also doing a general banking 
i)usiness which amounts to about fifty thousand 
dollars annually. He also handles coal, lumber, 
cement, etc., and in this venture is very success- 
ful, having built uj) a lucrative trade. He also 
owns a fine farm of one hundred and fifiy-five 
acres in Ohio township, to which he gives his 
supervision, although he does not carry on the 
active work of the fields. Here he has a finely 
improved place, on which are found all modern 
improvements, including a fine home, supplied 
with every convenience for the comfort of the 
family, and on this place he and his family re- 
side, although his business intere-ts are in the 
village of Kasbeer. 

On the Sith of January, 1S7S, Mr. Smith was 
united in marriage to !Miss Harriet A. Tickrey, 
a native of Bureati county, born in Ohio township, 
October 18, 1S5S. Her parents are William and 
Eliza (Adams) A'ickrey, natives of Ohio. They 
came westward to Illinois in 1840. settling in 
Bureau county, and here Mrs. Smith was born, 
reared and educated. In their family were eleven 
children, of whom four are deceased, while Mrs. 
Smith was the fifth in order of birth. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Smith have been born a 
daugliter and son: Cora E.. born Septeralier S, 
ISTS; and Charles A., l.oii, .Tune 11, I8s4. Mr. 
Smith gives his support u> the men and measures 
of the rejiublican ]iarty, and is interested in local 
political aft'airs, having served as township assessor 
for four years, as road commissioner for four 
years, while for eighteen years he was school di- 
rector, and in all these positions he was loyal to 
the interests of the general public. He is liberal 
in his religious views and is not identil'.:d with 
any church organization. 

Jlr. Smith had financial assistance fr^im his 
father to the amount of four thousand dollars, 
and by excellent business judgment, industry and 
integrity he has increased th.e scope of his in- 
terests until, tlirough his various business enter- 
prises, he has accumidated a competence which 
classes him among the substantial residents of 
Kasbeer and Bureau county. He is active in 
every movement which tends to advance the wel- 
fare of his town or county, is interested in educa- 
tional progress and expects to give to his children 
every possible advantage in this direction. He 
is a great lover of music, is fond of his home 
and family and does everything in his power for 
their comfort and hajipiness. He is leading a 
very bus}- life, conducting extensive business in- 



PAST AND I'UKSKNT OF r.L'KKAr COUN'JA' 



terests which add to the substantial development 
of his town, for the finu of Smith Brothers & 
Company carry a well selected stock of general 
inercluuulise, which meets the demands of the gen- 
eral pul.lic, heiug one of the best enteprises of the 
kind in Bureau county. His banking, coal and 
lumber interests are also carefully conducted, and 
in all of those ventures he is meeting with grati- 
fying success, adding not only to his own tinan- 
cial "resources, but tliey also prove of benefit to 
the town and surrounding country. He makes his 
home on his farm, where, after the day's cares are 
laid aside, he can enjoy the rest and quiet of a 
rural e.\istenee, for here he has every comfort 
which goes to make life worth living. Mr. Smith 
has a. wide business acquaintance, not only in 
Kasbecr, but throughout Bureau county, for his 
e.Ktcnsive interests bring him in contact with a 
large number of people. He and his wife are 
prominent socially, the hospitality of the best 
homes of the county being extended to them, while 
in their own home their many friends are always 
received with a hearty welcome. 



CHAKLES F. ANDEKSOX. 
The growth and development of a community 
depemls not only upon its farmers but upon the 
men who are at the head of its commercial and 
industrial interests and who bring to bear in its 
public life the spirit of enterprise which domi- 
nates them in the private business interests. 
Charles F. Anderson is a worthy representative 
of this class of citizens and is now successftilly 
conducting a grocery and meat market at 820 and 
823 North Main street in Princeton. A native 
of the western part of Sweden, he was born in 
Yestergotland, Jane lO, iscc, and is a son of 
Samuel Anderson, win. e:im.' to T.invau county 
with his family in 181 1, at wlii'li time he took 
up his ahode near rriiucton. tin re engaging in 
farming for some time, wln.u In' ri:inuved to the 
county seat, when; he has since resided. His wife 
passed away in February, 1891. In the family 
were two children: Miss Mary, who is living at 
home, and Charles F., now residing at 714 X'oith 
Church stieet. 

Charles F. Anderson was a lad of only fi\e 
summers when brought by his parents to the new- 
world, and his education was acquired in the 
Princeton schools to the age of thirteen years, 
when he began providing for hi> own support as 
a clerk in a'Priueeton stoiv. He tlrst clerked for 
Swan Linn & Company in the in.rthei-n part of 
the city and he eagerly availed hituself of every 
opportunity of gaining an intimate knowledge of 
the business and for ad\aneement along commer- 
cial lines. lu ISi.H) he took a position with Kings- 
fords &. Sons as traveling salesman and continued 
with them for nearly two years, after which, with 
capital ?aved from his own earnings, he began 



business on iiis own account, opening a grocery 
store in the north end of the city, where he has 
since remaiinjd. In 1001, at his present location, 
he erected a store building two stories in height 
and one hundred and twenty-five by thirty-two 
feet in size. The front part of the upper story 
is used as a dentist's office and the rear part of 
the second story is occupied by the Shabbona 
Club of Princeton. Mr. Anderson has secured a 
good trad.' ami lias a \^.■ll aiipointcd grocery and 
market, wlii.li in its neat and tasteful arrange- 
ment and the e.xeelleni line of goods carried at- 
tracts a large and growing patronage. Mr. An- 
derson was united in marriage October llj, IS'.l-j, 
to :Miss Evelyn M. Larson, who was born July 
19, 1872, in Princeton, ami is the daughter of 
P. G. Larson, an old time furniture dealer and 
undertaker of Princeton, who ].assed away in 
February, 1902. In the family w-vr three chil- 
dren: Earl 1'., Minerva E. and I'v.'lyii M., the 
latter now Mrs. Anderson. Mrs. Lar.-..in since his 
death is still continuing the business in Prince- 
ton. The home of Mr. and ilrs. Anderson has 
been blessed with one son, Lloyd F., bom August 
1-3, 1899. The family arc members of the Lti- 
thcran church in Princeton and Mr. Anderson 
belongs to the ilasonic and Odd Follows lodges. 
Politically he is a republican and is now a mem- 
ber of the board of education, in \yhich he takes a 
very active interest. He was a member of the 
city council as alderman for eight years, and at 
one time was nominated for mayor of Princeton; 
has twice been a delegate to the" state convention, 
once \yhen Governor Yates was nominated at 
Peoria, \yhilc he and Senator Washburn were del- 
egates wdien Governor l^eneen received his nomina- 
tion at Springfield. He is a leader in business 
and republican circles and has wielded a \yi.le in- 
fluence for progress and improvement along all 
these lines. Dependent upon his own resources 
from the age of thirteen years, he has made steady 
advancement in his business career and his life 
record jiroves the value of force of enterprise and 
diligence in overthrowing obstacles and wresting 
fortune fmm the hands of fate. 



HEXI;Y FL'LLEi;. 
On the roster of othcials in Bur.'au county ap- 
pears the name of Heaiy Fuller, circuit clerk and 
recorder, who since 1892 has filled this position, 
his long connection therewith being conclusive 
evidencc°of his ability and also of th.c confidence 
reposed in him by his fellow citizens. He was 
born in Xew York city, December fi, 18-52. His 
father, Ira E. Fuller, w'as a native of Xew Hamp- 
shire, and when a young man removed to Xew 
York, where he ^vas" en-_'aged in business. About 
1S.".S he renn.vL'il wil'n Ids family to Princeton 
an.l aft.T a I'.w year.- was conn.-cted with com- 
mercial int. Tests 'in this city as a grocer until 



■.;"> 



i / 

\ / 



/ 



/.- 



CHAIJLKS r. AXJ)Ki;SO-\. 




STOKE OF C. F. AXDFKSOX. 



I'AS'J' AND ]'J;KSKX'J' OF P-LKIIAU COTXTV 



18G8. In 1S70 lie purdiasoa a farm in ])e Kalb 
county, whcix'Oii lie resided until his death, whicli 
occiiri-eJ in 1885, when he was seventy-three years 
of age. lie wedded Catherine Withall, a native 
of Englaud. 

Henry Fuller of this review is indebted to the 
public-school system of rriii(it..n for tliu edu- 
cational privileges he enjoyed, amJ after putting 
aside lii.s text-books he farmed with lii< father un- 
til nineteen years of age. He then wl-iU to Wal- 
nut, Illinois, as a clerk, and in 1ST9 lie embarked 
in business on his own account, continuing at that 
place until 1893, when he was elected to the office 
of circuit clerk and recorder. He has since filled 
the position and his re-election has come as proof 
of his capability and fidelity in the discharge of 
his duties.' - 

In 18T7 Mr. Fuller was united in marriage to 
Jliss Ella Wliitver, a daughter of John WhUver, 
of Walnut, and they have three children: John 
Edgar, Darlene K. and Gertrude. Both !Mr. and 
Mrs. Fuller are widely known in Princeton and 
he is a popular citizen with a wide and favorable 
acquaintance in business and political as well 
a.s social circles. In politics he is a republican, 
stalwart and unfaltering in his support of the 
party, and for the pa.st eight years he lias served 
as secretary of the county central committee, in 
which connection he has done effective work 
througli party organizations to secure republican 
successes. As a public spirited and enterprising 
citizen, he takes an active interest in all public 
improvements and is liberal in his support of any 
measure calculated to promote tlie general wel- 
fare. He is an optimist in the best sense of 
the word and looks on the bright side of every- 
thing. 



Z. S. HIIJ.S. 

Z. S. Hills, engaged in the practice of law in 
Princeton, also notary public, loan, insurance and 
real estate agent, was born in Palmer, Massachu- 
setts, June 25, 18.32, a son of Cyrus and Amanda 
(Olds) Hills. The father, a native of Connecticut, 
was a farmer by occupation, and in the year 1813 
removed to Illinois, settling at Fa Moille, Bureau 
county, where he bought land and began farming. 
His attention was given to general agricultural 
pursuits until his life's labors were ended in death, 
in 18GS, when he was seventy-two years of age. 

Z. S. Hills, whose name introduces this record,' 
was a youth of about eleven years when the family 
came to Illinois. He continued his education in 
the schools of Bureau county and as a student in 
Smith's Seminary at Princeton, displaying special 
aptitude in his books and beciiming well qualified 
for the profession of teaching, which ho followed 
for twenty-five years in Bureau county. At one 
time he was principal of the schools at Xeponset 
and Princeton, afterward at La Moille and lastly 



in OliKj, lluivau county, and was thus closely as- 
sociated with the eilueatioii.l! progit-ss of Lliis"])art 
of the state, but at length he retired fr..m pro- 
fessional lai^ors, and from 1879 until 1>'.IG con- 
ducted a drug store in Ohio. For many years he 
was interested in law, however, and wlit-u in 1896 
he gave up his store he took u]) the studv of law 
and was admitted t.. the bar in Xovembe'r, 1897. 
Iniuieiliatcly alteiwaid lie began practice in 
i'rinct't.in, and li.is secured a good clientage here. 
He is also notary public, and conduits a loan, in- 
surance and real estate agency, which is also an 
important tiranch of his business. 

In 18(11 Mr. llill.s was unit-d in marriage to 
Miss Susan A. Ihniuvrr, of La Moillr, who died in 
Princeton in .Mai-ch, 190-5, lea\iug one sou, P. 
Fred Hills. Jn his political athliation Mr. Hills 
is independent. In the years of an anive pro- 
fessional and mercantile career he has made a 
creditable record, and has long been accounted one 
of the representative business men of this county. 



CHAKTvES L. COIIEY. 

Charles L. Corey, a substantial fanner of Bu- 
reau county, owning and operating one hundred 
and sixty acres of land in Ohio township, was born 
in this county on the 2Sth of March, 1Sij9, being 
tlie only child born unto John H. and Phoeba A. 
(Payuor) Corey. The father was born in Morgan 
county, Illinois, in 18-11, while the nioih-;r's birth 
occurred in Pennsylvania, April 8, 1850. 

Charles L. Corey received a common-school ed- 
ucation, and, after putting aside his text-books, 
started out to make his own way in life, choosing 
farm work as his occupation. He possessed strong 
courage and was determined in his purpose, pros- 
pering yerr by year in his undertakings, so that 
he is now in possession of a valuable farm property 
of one hundred and sixty acres, situated in Ohio 
township, which is worth one hundred and fifty 
dollars per acre. Here he is engaged in general 
agricultural pursuits. He possesses good business 
ability, uses the latest improved machinery to carry 
on tlie work of cultivating his land, has added all 
modern iniprovenicnts to his place, including a 
good residence and substantial outbuildings, so 
that liis farm is n(3w one of the best in the town- 
ship. 

Mr. Corey chose as a companion and helpmate 
for life's journey iliss Carrie L. Taylor, to whom 
he was married on the 5th of February, 1S95. She 
was Ijorn in Berlin township, Bureau county, on 
the 2Sth of January, 1S7G, and received her edu- 
cation in the public schools at Dover, Illinois. Her 
parents are Ilenry L. and Anna L. (Eudebaugh) 
Taylor, the father being a native of Ohio, while 
the mother's birth occurred in the Keystone state. 
They accompanied their respective parents to Bu- 
reau countv, Illinois, and were here married. In 



I'AST ANJ> rJiK^EXT OF BUJIKAU e^O^^'J'Y, 



their iaimly were live eluidreii, of uhoni .Mrs. 
L'orcy is the seeond in (irJer uf IjirUi. 

Unto our subjeel ;niil hrs uile liave been liorn 
three eliildreii, us folious; Vera, born January G, 
ISyS; Phoeba, born Mareh '21, 1<JU3; and Lee" C, 
born January 11, 11)0-3. ilr. Corey has always 
given his politieal support to tlie republiean party, 
ulnlc ill religious failli hr is librral. being iJenti- 
liid \wili no ehureh orgaiiizaiinii, IniL his wife is a 
member of the United ijrelhn.'n ehureh. Mr. Corey 
is a member of the Sons of Veterans. lie has 
never sought or desired politieal offief, but prefers 
rather to give his entire time to his business in- 
terests, in whieh lie is meeting with splendid suc- 
cess. He has worked hard to allaiii sueeess, and 
his plaee is evidence that his labors have been 
riehl}' Tewarded, for on his farm of one hundred 
and si.xty acres he has a line country home and 
substantial outbuildings, and he has also set out 
many shade trees, whieh add to the beauty of the 
■place. He is a great lover of music, and is deeply 
interested in tlie cause of education, and intends 
to give his children every advantage in musical and 
educational lines. He and his wife are popular 
among their many friends and are mmibered 
anion'; the leadinu' residents of their native couiitv. 



JAMES L. COULTEi;. 
James L. Coulter, owning and operating tuo 
hundred and eighty-eight acres of fine farming 
land in Ohio township, situated on section ■■?;), 
is one of Bureau county's native sons, his birth 
having here occurred Jananary 15, 185G. His 
parents were Robert and Catherine (Smith) 
Coulter, the former born in Ohio and the latter 
in Indiana. The mother had removed from her 
native stale to Bureau count\-, Hlinois, in IS'-'S, 
while the year lS-13 witnessed tlie arrival of the 
father, and in this county they were niarriol 
and reared a family of ten children, while one 
died at the age of three years. Both the father 
and mother are now deceased. 

James L. Coulter, wliosc name introducf"- 
thi.- review, was reared and educated in Bureau 
county and after putting aside his text books be- 
gan farming on his own account, first renting 
land, which he operated for twelve years, and, 
being successful in his farm work, was tlien en- 
abled to purchase a tract of one hundred and 
twenty-five acres, situated on section 20, Ohio 
township. For this tract he paid forty-three 
dollars and a half per acre, and as his financial 
resources havi: increased he has added to hi- 
property, making an additional purchase of one 
hundred and sixty-tliree acres adjoining the 
original tract, and his wife owns one hundred 
and sixtv acres nenr by. He also owns six hun- 
dred and forty acres of land in Wisconsin. On 
his home farm are found a beautiful residence 



and outbuildings for the shelter of grain and 
stock, many shade trees which add to the attnic- 
ti\e aj.peai'aucc of the place, and akogellier he 
has a tine farm, on which he i> engaged m gen- 
eral farming, using the latest improved metliods 
in carrying on the work of tlie lields. 

Air. Coulter chose as a companion and help- 
mate on life's journey, Miss ]\Ialissa Kasbeer, to 
whom he u.is married on the 2Sth of October, 
1SS7. She is a daughter of John S. and ilan- 
uali (Ross) Kasbeer, the former born in Tus- 
carawas county, Ohio, December 28, 1818, hav- 
ing removed to Bureau county, Illinois, in 181o, 
while the mother's birth occurred in ISoG. Both 
are yet living. In their family were twelve 
children, of whom four are deceased, while ilrs. 
Coulter is the ninth in order of birth, her natal 
day being j\Iay 34, 186"2. Unto JMr. and jMrs. 
Coulter have been born four sons, namely: Ray- 
mond B., born January 10, 1SS9; L. Dean, born 
November 2, 1890; j". Milton, April 19, 1S9C.. 
and Glen G., April 4, 1898. 

In politics Mr. Coulter is a republican, and 
he and his family are membeis of the I\Ietlio- 
dist I'rotostant church. He is a member of the 
Masonic lodge, Xo. 814, at Ohio, and also of 
Modern Woodmen camp, Xo. 492. Altiiough 
starting out in life empty-handed, Mr. Coulter 
has through his energy and perseverance accu- 
mulated a fine projierty, being now the owner of 
two hundred and eighty-eight acres of valuable 
land situated on section 29, Ohio township, 
while his wife is the owner of one hundred and 
sixty acres near by, and he also owns six hun- 
dred and forty acres of land in Wisconsin. He 
has added many modern improvements to his 
home place, is progressive in his farm work, giv- 
ing his personal supervision to his business in- 
terests, and year by year he harvests excellent 
crops, so that he is now numbered among the 
substantial residents of Bureau county. He de- 
serves much credit for what he has accomplished 
in a business v.'ay, for his success is due entirely 
to his own labor and business ability. He has 
always been straightforward in his dealings with 
his fellowmeu, and he and his estimable wife 
have many warm personal friends in Bureau 
countv, V, here tlicv have both spent their entire 
lives. ' 



PARKER XOYES :\rASOX. 
Parker Xoycs Afa-on. who has been closely asso- 
ciatcil with journalistic interests in the county 
and is now publisher of the Plain Dealer at Buda. 
was horn in Concord township, October 4, 1862, 
upon the farm belonging to his father, Cyrus P. 
:\[ason. who was born A\igust 13, 1831, in Pitts- 
field, Xcw Hampslure. He was a farmer and 
stock-rais-r and died Januarv 8, 1807, at Buda, 



PAS'L' AM) ri;j:si:xT oi 



r.v 



Au L'Oi:.\Ty 



Illinois, llu luanic'J Siuali J. ^'oyt'.^, who wa.s 
born in Sprhigfiekl, New llaiiipshirc, Felniiary 
25, 1833, and died lEarch 3, 19U0, in Uuda. 
Further mention is made of the raniily in eon- 
nivtimi witli the sketches of John :Mason and 
Cyruj r. ;\[ason on other pages of tliis work. 

P. X. jMason was born and reared upon the 
home farm, a mile west of Buda, and [uii.-ikm! his 
education in the public schools of I'.uil.i, allliuii,^di 
his attendance covered less than ten years, during 
which time he completed the work of the ninth 
grade. His early experiences were those which 
usually come to a farm boy, and in his youth he 
manifested considerable mechanical ingenuity. 
His father established a cider-mill, operated by a 
steam engine, and a,fterward a feed-mill and 
sugar-cane-mill and subsequently a creamery. V. 
N. Mason did his share of the work in connection 
with all of these enterprises as well as in the 
fields, and in 1885 he extended the scope of his 
activity by purchasing a small job press and some 
type. He then began to do job printing, master- 
ing the business from the reading of books or 
papers or anything ho coidd get bearing upon tlic 
subject. In January, ISST, he carried out a 
cherished idea of entering the newspaper field by 
establishing the Biichi Plain Dealer, which he be- 
gan to publish on the farm, a mile fi'om town. 
He continued its publication there for two months 
and then, as it promised to be a success, he re- 
moved to Buda, since which time he has continued 
in the publication of the paper, which is one of 
the leading country newspapers of this part of 
the state. He has also been connected with vari- 
ous other publications. On the 3d of January, 
1889, ho established in ShetTield the Bureau Coun- 
ty Times, which he sold to Charles A. Pratt on 
the 19th of September of the same year. On the 
7th of Xovembcr following he established a paper 
in Wyanet, with A. B. Case in charge, but dis- 
continued its publication when S. E. Warden & 
Company opened a newspaper office in the town 
July 14, 1893. That paper was published in 
the Buda office during tlie four years of its exist- 
ence. On the 27th of February, 1891. ^Ir. Mason 
started a paper in Xeponset, with J. T. Miller in 
charge, the printing being done in the Buda office, 
but discontinued this paper in the fall of 1891 
on the removal of ili-. Millei' from Xeponsct. H(^ 
has been generally successful in his newspaper 
ventures and from the beginning the Plain Dealer 
has proven a profitable investment. In 1900 he 
became interested in the Indejiendent telephone 
movement, now known as the Empire Teliphone 
Companv, and has since nuinngrd tlu^ exihan-r in 
Buda. ' , ' 

Mr. Mason as editor and as a private citizen has 
been closely identified with everything tending 
toward the improvement of his town and, com- 
munity. He has, since attaining his majority, 
been a strong factor in local republican ranks and 
is against licensing or in any way favoring the 



liquor traffic. He has e.vcrled a strong and bene- 
licial influence in community affairs and has ren- 
dered capable service in public office, acting as 
village clerk of Buda from 189G until 1900, as 
president of the board for two years, in 1900 and 
1901, and as village trustee in 1904 and 1905. 
His fraternal relations are extensive. He belongs 
to Buda lodge, No. 399, A. F. & A. M., in which 
he has served as secretary, and in other offices; to 
the Fasteru Star chapter. No. 218, in which lie lias 
been secretary and worthy patron; tlie Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, No. ST.J, in wliich 
ho has filled all of the offices; Buda eni/ampment, 
No. 130, 1. 0. 0. F., in which he has also filled 
all of the chairs; Itebekah lodge. No. 339, of 
which, he has been secretary; French Grove camp 
of the Jlodern Woodmen of America, of which 
he was clerk for five years; and Arena lodge, K. 
P., of which he was a charter member. 

Mr. Mason was married in Buda, July 3, 1SS9, 
to Gertrude Seguine, a daughter of William S. 
and Barbara (Buelian) Seguine, whose sketch 
appears elsewhere in this work. Unto ilr. and 
Mrs. Mason have been born two children: ^layne, 
June 3, 1890; and Itoss N., April 27, 1893. Both 
were born in Buda. The juuenis and sons are 
members of the Bajitist church. 



ANDPEW W. NELSON. 

Andrew W. Nelson, engaged in farming in 
Manlius lnwnshi]), was born in Sweden, February 
14, 1834, a son of Nels Carlson and Ingre Nelson. 
He came to America in the spring of ISGl. He 
had spent the days of his boyhood and youth in 
his native country, and, believing that the new- 
world offered better opportunities, lie came to the 
United States when a young man of twenty-seven 
years. His capital was limited at that time, his 
lack of financial resources rendering immediate 
employment a necessity. He therefore worked at 
farm labor for about four years and then with 
the capital which he had acquired began farming 
on his own account on rented land. As a com- 
panion and helpmate for life's journey he chose 
I\riss Christina Sophia Widestrom, of Princeton, 
whom he wedded on the 23d of February, 1865. 

It was in 1870 that Mr. Nelson purchased a 
I'lart of his present homestead, becoming owner of 
one hundred and sixty acres, to which he has since 
added until within the boundaries of his farm are 
now comprised three hundred and sixty acres of 
very rich and productive land. He has greatly 
improved the property, putting up good barns 
ami other outbuihlings and erecting a fine resi- 
dence, which is one of the model farm homes of 
the locality. Everything about the place is neat 
and is kept in excellent condition, showing his 
careful supervision and progressive methods. 

Unto ^Fr. and ^Irs. Nelson were born two chil- 
dren: Nels Oscar William, who was born Decem- 



PAST AND P1;KS]:XT of BUIiEAU COUKTY. 



ber 13, 1SG5, was marriod February IG, ISSS, to 
Miss Marllia U. Hurst, and they have two cliil- 
drcn, Carrie Christine and Earl Oscar. Hannah 
Josephine Nelson, born April S, 1SG9, became the 
wife of James Montague Allen, a commercial 
traveler of Chicago, on the 20th of November, 
1894, and tliey also have two children, James M. 
and Merle Edith. In ISri Jlr. Nelson was called 
upon to mourn the loss of his wife, wlio died on 
the 25th of November of that year. About two 
years later, on the 9th of October, 1S73, Mr. Nel- 
son was married to Miss Rebecca Nelson, of 
Wyanet, a daughter of Okey and Ellen Nelson, 
who were farming people of that locality. Five 
children have been born of this marriage : Emma 
Geneva, born August 13, 187G; Arthur Harmon, 
a farmer who was born February 18, 1879, and 
was married February 15, 1905, to Mi.ss Estella 
M. Martin, by whom he has one child, Viola Ellen; 
Edith Blenda, who was born May 13, 1881, and is 
a milliner at ilanlius ; !Mabcl Elcanora, born Sep- 
tember 7, 1881; and Carl 0.. March 7, 1889. 

In his political views Mr. Nelson is a democrat 
and has served as school director for many years. 
He has never been a politician, however, in the 
sense of oflice seeking, preferring to give his \)n- 
divided time and attention to his business affairs 
and in connection vith his agricultural interests 
he is a stocklioMer in the Farmers Elevator at 
Manlius. Coming to the United States without 
capital, he has here improved the business op- 
portunities ofTered, has made the best use of his 
advantages and lias gradually worked his way up- 
ward until he is now one of the substantial resi- 
dents of liis adopted county, with a valuable farm 
to show for his life of industry and perseverance. 



JAMES EDWATH) MONIEIt. 
James Edward Monier is a fanner and stock- 
man, residing on section 33, Milo township, where 
he owns two hundred and forty acres. He was 
born April IS, 18G-4, in Marshall county, Illinois, 
and possesses the typical spirit of enterprise and 
progress which has been the dominant factor in 
the rapid and substantial upbuilding of the middle 
west. His parents were "William and Wilniiua 
(Doran) Monier. The father was born on the 
Isle of ilan, and, with his parents, came to 
America when sixteen years of age. He married 
Miss Doran, a native of Massachusetts. Locating 
in Peoria county, Illinois, he afterward removed 
to Camp Grove, Marshall county, where ho has 
since resided. He is an extensive and wealthy 
farmer, now owning a thousand acres of fine land 
in Marshall county and one hundred and sixty 
acres in Bureau county. He engages in stock- 
raising on a large scale, and his dealings in fine 
stock have made him a leading representative of 
this line of business in Illinois. He displays ex- 
cellent business judgment, keen discernment, sa- 
gacity and unfaltering diligence, and thus the 



success which he has acquired has been most hoii- 
oraljle as well as gratif_ving, for it has come as the 
legitimate result of his own labors. Prominent 
in political circles, hi gives a stalwart support to 
the republican party and does everything in his 
power to promote its growth and insure its suc- 
cess. His home is jileasantly located six miles 
west of Lacon, Illinois. 

James Edward Monier is the only member of 
a family of seven children, five sons and two 
daughters, who is not a resident of Marshall coun- 
ty. His youth was there passed and his educa- 
tion was acquired in tlie district schools and the 
high School of Sparland. He always lived at home 
until 1891, when lie was married and came to 
Bureau county, where he has since resided. The 
occupation to which he was reared he has made 
his life work, and he now owns and operates two 
hundred and forty acres of fine land in Milo 
township, where he raises both grain and stock. 
He is a breeder of shorthorn cattle, is breeding 
first-class stock and has fifteen head of registered 
cattle. Ho also breeds Percheron horses, and 
has about twenty-five head upon his farm most of 
the time. Success seems an attendant to his busi- 
ness efforts, for whatever he nndertakcs he ac- 
complishes, and he lias not lacked the financial 
return which is the desired reward of all business 
endeavor. 

In 1894 Mr. Jlonier was married to Miss Clara 
L. Casey, of Marshall county, Illinois, a daughter 
of Charles Casey, a farmer now residing in that 
county. Mr. and ilrs. ilonier have become the 
parents of four children, and the family circle yet 
remains unbroken by the hand of death. These 
are Nellie, Margaret, Lura and Wilbur Monier. 
The parents hold mejiiborship in the ]\Icthodist 
church, and Mr. ilonier belongs to the Masonic 
lodge at Bradford and to the Modern Woodmen 
camp at Whitefield, Illinois. Politically he is a 
republican, and in 1902 was elected supervisor 
of Milo township, which ofTice he is still filling. 
He has been a meiidier of the school board for 
years, and is still the incumbent in that position. 
He regards a public office as a j)ublic trust — and 
no trust reposed in him has ever been betrayed in 
the slightest degree. He is loyal and patriotic in 
his citizenship, is progressive and diligent in busi- 
ness, and In friendship he is evtr faithful and true. 



JOHN leoxat;d KEID. 

John Leonard Reid, who has resided in Milo 
township from the age of twenty-two 3"ears, now 
follows farming on section 35 and is also filling 
the office of road commissioner, in which capacity 
he labors to secure the adoption of his ideas con- 
cerning good roads. Born in Scott county, In- 
diana, on the 16th of October, 1811, he is"a son 
of Matthew M. and Sarah .-\nn (Horner) Peid, 
the former born in ^tarvland in 1814 and the lat- 



PAS'l 



Axn i'i;i 



;xT 



r.riiKAi' C()i"\'j'V, 



ter iu Iiidiiuiii in IS'JO. After rc.-.iiliiig fur sotuc 
years iu the Hoosier state, the fatlicr came with 
his family to Illinois in IMarch, 1S5], and lo- 
cated iu Milo township, Bureau county. He first 
purchased land on section 3G, just across tlio road 
from the farm of his sou, John L., and tliere he 
spent his remaining days, but iu the meantime 
he added to his property until he was the owner 
of two hundred acres of very valuable farm land. 
He died Poeember G, ISSO, and his wife has also 
passed away, while of their family of nine chil- 
dren one is deceased, Sarah E., who married 
Frank Corbin and died December 1, 1899. She 
was the second in order of birth, while John Leon- 
ard Eeid is the eldest. The others of the family 
are: Davi_d L., a resident of Iowa; George W., 
of Jlilo township; Maria J., the wife of Festus 
Bentlcy, of !Milo township; William IT., who is 
living iu Jlodena, Illinois; Mary Evaliue, the 
■wife of Frank Crisman, a resident of Lincoln, 
ITebraska; Atlantic, the wife of Joseph Hufnagel, 
who follows farmiiij:; iu 'SUlo tnwnsbiii; and Nel- 
lie, the wife of Ku,i:ene Vale, of Princi'toii, Illi- 
nois. 

John L. Keid was educated in the common 
schools and started out in life on his own acount 
when twenty-two years of age, since which time 
he has lived in W\\o township. His first tract of 
land comprised forty acres, vrhich he purchased 
from his father iu 1870 and which is still iu his 
possession, but the years have witnessed consid- 
erable progress in his business career and he is 
today the owner of oue hundred and si.xty acres 
of fine land, well improved, in Jlilo township, to- 
gether with thirty acres of timber land. His work 
is that of a general farmer and stock-raiser and 
he also feeds consideralde cattle and bogs. He 
has likewise operated a threshing machine for a 
number of years and his life has been oue of 
untiring activity and unfaltering perseverance. 

In 1SG4 occurred the marriage of ^Mr. Eeid and 
Miss Fannie iloore, who was born at Birming- 
ham, England, iu 1847, and was brought to the 
United States in 18-19 by her pareuts, John and 
Harriet (Butler) ^foore, both of whom are now 
deceased, her father having resided in Indiana 
imtil his death. Mr. and Mrs. Eeid became the 
parents of four children. Charles L., the eldest, 
born in Milo township, November 2, 186.5, at- 
tended the comou schools and spent three years as 
a student in the Bradford high school. He has 
always followed farming and he pu. ••chased forty 
acres of land where he now resides. On this he 
has erected a fine residence and has made many 
modern improvements. He also works his father's 
farm and keeps some stock. He married Jennie 
Colehower, a native daughter of Milo township. 
Her parents, Conrad and Elizabeth (Grady) Cole- 
hover, are both living. ^Mrs. and !\[rs. Charles 
L. Eeid became the parents of six children, four 
of whom survive: Ethel, Harold, lEarriet and 
Howard. Jennie A. Eeid became the wife of 



lleury Smith, of Milo toun..liip, and died June 
1, 1899, leaving one child, Margaret, who makes 
her home with Jfr. and ^Irs. Eeid Sadie A. died 
October 16, 1894. Hattie V., who cnmplcte.? the 
family, is yet at home. 

Jlr. Eeid is a stalwart republican, dcojily in- 
terested in the success and growth of his party. 
He has been road commissioner for a number of 
years, filling the office at the present time, and 
he has also been school director for some vears. 
He belongs to Gem lodge, No. 572, I. 0. 6. F., 
of AVhitefield, Illinois, of which he is a charter 
mouilier and in which he has twice passed through 
all the cbaii-s. He is al~i> connected with the 
Modern Woodmen camp at Wliitefield, and is in 
thorough sympathy with the principles of these 
orders,, \\-hich are based tipon brotherly kindness 
and helpfulness. ;Mr. Eeid is popular with many 
friends because of his excellent traits of char- 
acter and genial, cordial disposition. 



JOSEPH K. WATERHOUSE. 

Joseph E. Waterhouse is one of ^^'aluut town- 
shijj's native sons, born on the loth of January, 
18G3. He is still living iu the same townshiij, and 
has always followed the occupation of farming. 
His parents wore Joseph and Kate (McCaun) 
^\'aterhouse, natives of England and of Ireland, 
respectively. Iu early life they came to the United 
States, settling iu Bureau county, and were mar- 
ried in Princeton about 1S56. The father was 
a shoemaker by trade, and during liis residence 
in the county scat f(jUowed that occupation. Sub- 
sequently he removed to Walnut township and 
engaged in farming on sections 14 and 15, pur- 
chasing one hundred and twenty acres of land, 
which coustitulcs the old homo fann, on which 
he reared his family. He afterward bought other 
land, and left at his death a valuable estate of 
five hundred and sixty acres. He passed away 
December 21, 1885. 

Joseph E. Waterhouse completed his education 
in district school No. 29, in Walnut township, and 
has always followed farming. He early became 
familiar with the duties and labors that fall to 
the lot of the agriculturist, for in the periods of 
vacation he worked in the fields, taking his place 
behind the plow when but a young lad. Since at- 
taining his niajority he has carried on farm work 
on his owu account, and as the years have passed 
he has prospered in his chosen field of labor. His 
home fann comprises two hundred acres of very- 
arable and productive land, whereon he is largely 
engaged in the raising of corn and oats. He also 
has considerable stock, his cattle being largely of 
the Hereford breed, his hogs of the Poland China 
breed and his horses of Norman blood. His farm 
is equipped with substantial buildings and a 
beautiful home, and everything about the place 
proves to the passer-by the enterprise of the owner 



776 



I'AS'i' AND ru\: 



;\T OF };ii;i:Ar corxTY. 



a.Tu 



ami thu fact tluit he koops in U>uvh with 
ideas of agrirultural duvoldpiw'nt. 

On the'2(ilh of February, IS'Jl, Mr. Watcrhous.- 
was unitcil in marriage to iliss Clara IlibbarJ, 
who was born April 27, 1S(5~>, a daughter of 
Joshua and Mary (Lumbard) llibbard, both ol 
whom were natives of Now York. 'J'bey cam.' to 
La Salle county witli the early f^'ttleis, and tli" 
father alway;^ followed the oeeup.itimi of fannin- 



as a means ol' livrl.bnod tor hniwWt amt lanniy 
He departed tin,, lilr m ISSS, and is stdl survived 
bvhis wid.m, wh.. .> n.AV Hvmg in Aurora, Illi- 
nois Mr. and .All,-;. Waleiliou.-^r have but one 
child. Mabel J., wh.i was born July •-'.-., iso-i, and 
is tlierel-ore twelve years of age. She is now a 
student in district school Xo. 30, in Walnut, town- 
ship. Mr. Watcrhousc has served for the past six 
years as school director, and believes in the em- 
plopnent of competent teachers and iu uphohliiig 
the standard of public instruction. Politically 
he is a democrat, but has no aspiration for the 
honors and emoluments of public olfice. His at- 
tention has been fully occupied by his business 
affairs, and he is one' of the representati\e agri- 
culturists of the community, carefully coudurting 
his business interests. 



GEOItGE ZINK. 

The life historv of a self-made man is always of 
interest. 'J'hore "is something inspiring in a vic- 
tory, and he who fights the battle of life_ courage- 
ously and conies otf conqueror in the strife is de- 
serving of respect. Such was the history of 
George Zink, one of the pioneer residents of 
Bureau countv, who was well known in this part 
of the state" and was respected and honored 
wherever known. He was born in Bedford county, 
Pennsylvania, November 30, IS-JS. The family 
was es'tablished in Pennsylvania at an early epoch 
in its development, the grandparents being John 
and Elizabetli (Howe) Zink, both of whom were 
natives of that state. The father of our subject, 
Samuel Zink, was a native of the Keystone state, 
born August 11, 1788. At an advanced age he 
went to Ohio, settling in that state in 18-11, and 
in 1814 he came to Bureau county, Illinois, where 
he joined his son George, who had arrived a year 
previous to that date. He then remained a resi- 
dent of Bureau county until his death, which oc- 
curred February 15, 18G6. His political allegiance 
was given to the republican party. His wife, who 
bore the maiden name of Catherine Hanawalt, was 
bom in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, Au- 
gust 2G, 1789, and died February 10, 1886. She 
was of Gemian extraction, and both she and her 
husband were members of the ^Methodist church. 

George Zink was one of a family of eleven chil- 
dren. His boyhood days were spent upon the old 
liome farm, and he attended the public schooU 
until about nineteen vears of age, when he wnt 



to Ohi" with the family. In 1S13, on attaining 
his majority, he came to P-ureau county, Illinois, 
locating about a mile east of Buda, where he pur- 
chased ^eighty acres of military land. It was all 
wild prairie, and he hauled the kuuber from 
Chicago in order to build upon his place a frame 
house. He then turned his attention to farming 
and stock-raising, and at one time owned about 
four huiulrcd acres of land, while at the time of 
his death he had an excellent farm of one hundred 
and twenty acres. Coming to the county at an 
earh- dav,"he experienced many of the hardships 
iucideiit'to life on the frontier, and he resolutely 
snug -led with conditions that made farming a 
ditlicult task because of the remoteness of the 
district from railroads and city markets. 

On the 2">tli of November, 1817, Mr. Zink was 
united in marriage to :\[iss Catherine Thompson, 
who was born June 2d, 1S22, in Huntingdon coun- 
ty, Penn.sylvania, a daughter of Andrew and Eliz- 
abeth (Heater) Thompson, natives of the Key- 
stone state. The father was of English lineage, 
while the mother was of German descent. In 
184.3 thev came to Bureau county, settling near 
Sheffield,'where Mr. Thompson followed the occu- 
pation of farming. He was born November 30, 
1786, and died December 24, 1847, at the age of 
sixty-one years, while his wife, who was born ]May 
1, 1792, passed away January 27, 18-54, at the 
ao-e of sixty-one years and eight moutlis, her re- 
mains being interred at Sheffield. Mrs. /ink was 
a young ladv when she accompanied her parents 
to this county, and she has since made her home 
here. As a bride she went to her husband's farm, 
and they resided continuously thereon for almost 
a half century. In 1895, however, they rented the 
farm and renioved to Buda, Mr. Zink retiring from 
active business life. He had well earned the rest 
which he enjoyed, for in former years he was a 
most energetic, active farmer, laboring untiringly 
day after dav, month after mouth and year after 
year until his diligence and perseverance had 
brought to him a substantial financial reward. ^ In 
the meantime seven children had been born into 
the family: Samuel Davis, who enlisted in the 
arniv at the age of only sixteen years, and died at 
Spri'ngfield before going south for active service; 
Thompson A., wdio is mentioned elsewhere in this 
volume ; Elizabeth E., who is still witli her mother ; 
Mary C, the wife of W. EI. Stutzman, of Buda; 
George A., of Chicago, and Orrin A. and 'Warren 
X., both of whom are residents of Buda. 

Mr. Zink held membership in the Jlethodist 
Episconal church, to which his wife still belongs. 
He remained a resident of Buda for about five 
vears, and passed away on the 5th of March, 1900, 
when iu the seventy-eighth year of his age. His 
had been an upright life, and in all relations he 
was found honorable and reliable, courteous and 
considerate. He exemplified daily the spirit of 
the Christian religion, "iu which he believed, and 
followed closely the golden rule, doing unto others 




MR. AND Mi;S. GPIOUGE ZIXK. 



PAST AM.) 1'J;KSHXT OF J'.UIMIVU COLLN'TY, 



779 



as he would luive tlieni do unto liiiu. He iiicl with 
a fair iiieasui'u oJ' sucecss in his business life and 
v.'on his prosperity not by taking advantage of 
otliers, but through close application and untiring 
etl'ort. Such a record is iuileed worthy of euiuhi- 
tion. Jlrs. Zink, still survi\ing her husband, 
resides in Buda, and is greatly estenned by many 
friends whom she lias made during tlie years of 
her long residence in tliis county. 



A. A. SrOOXEK. 

Among the prominent and substantial citizens 
of Bureau county, Illinois, are those who assist 
in the agricultural progress and development of 
this section of the state, and to tliis class belongs 
A. A. Spooner, wdio is a reiireseutative of the 
farming interests of Ohio township. He is a 
native of the state of Xcw York, his birth having 
occurred in Madison county on the ISth of Decem- 
ber, 1S"2(), a son of Sir Prince and Eebecca (Pat- 
terson) Spooner, in whose family were eight cliil- 
dren, of whom the subject of tbis review' is the 
youngest. 

In the district schools of Xcw York our sub- 
ject received his preliminary education, whicli was 
supplemented by a course of study in Madison 
Academy in that state. He came to Illinois from 
the east at an early day, believing that the west 
would afFoi'd better opportunity for advancement 
in a business way than he would enjoy in his 
native state. He soon manifested the spirit domi- 
nant in the western country and by his industry 
and good business ability, in due course of time, 
became the possessor of good farming land, to 
which he has added as his laboi's have brought 
him capital, until he is now owning and operating 
a fine tract of land, constituting three hundred 
and twenty acres, valued at one hundred and fifty 
dollars per acre. Tt is situated in Ohio townsliip, 
and here he carries on general agricultural pur- 
suits, following modern and practical methods in 
all his work. Tie has here a nice home and many 
substantial outbuildings, and the neat and at- 
tractive ajipearance of the place makes it one of 
the most valuable fai-ms of tlie county. 

After residing in Illinois for a few years Mr. 
S])ooner soiight a companion and helpmate for 
life's jniirney, and on the 24th of ifarch, 1858, 
was married to Jliss JIary E. Philpot, who was 
born September 20, 1841, a native of Xcw York 
and a daughter of George and JFary (Tookc) 
Pl\ilpot, both natives of the state of Xew York, 
where they always made their honu'. ilr. Philpot 
was a well educated man and a lawyer by profes- 
sion, but on account of ill health was unable to 
engage in tlie practice of his chosen calling. 'Mrs. 
Spooner received here early educational privi- 
leges in the common schools of her native jilace 
and later pursued a course of study in the Oneida 
Ladies" Seiiiinar\-, at Oneida, Xew York. I'nti^ 



.Mr. and M i.~. Spooner have been born five chil- 

diiii, i.f \\\ I two are deceased. Those living 

aiv: I'liiiir Kduard, born September 20, 1863; 
Winifred ]l., October 27, 1872; an.l Allen G., 
born May 1, 1880. 

In his jiolitical views ]\lr. Spooner is a repub- 
lican and tak'cs an active interest in local political 
alTairs. Pojnilar with his fellow townsmen, he 
has been called to fill a number of positions of 
trust, having served as supervisor of East Grove 
township, Eee county, Illinois, for several years 
ju-evious to his removal to Bureau county. He also 
served as justice of the peace for two terms, as 
road commissioner for eight years, and as school 
trustee for a .similar period, and in all these posi- 



tions 



displ 



rk.'d abilitv and discliarired 



the duties whii.h drvolvcd ujion him in a very 
creditable mann.r. In hi.■^ religimis vicv.s ilr. 
Spooner is liberal, but is no: idcntiiled with any 
church organization. 

Having started out in life for himself without 
capital, he possessed a strong will and a determina- 
tion to succeed, and coming to the west in early 
manhood he sought and utilized every opportunity 
that presented itself and by hard work and econ- 
omy worked his way upward until he is now the 
owner of a tract of land of three hundred and 
twenty acres, valued at one hundred and fifty dol- 
lars per acre, and his is one of the most pro- 
ductive farms of Bureau county. He is one of the 
prominent and progresive farmers of his com- 
munity and is highly estecTned both in business 
and social circles. 



GEOIIGE EDSOX ZIXK. 

George Edsuu Zink, who is engaged in farming 
and stock-raising in Concord township, making 
a specialty of Durham cattle, was born October 
27, ISGG, in ]\racon township, his parents having 
been pioneer residents of that locality. He is 
a son of John and Elizabeth (Scnsel) Zink, whose 
sketch is found elsewhere in this work. 

The public schools afforded George E. Zink his 
early educational privileges, and after completing 
his more specilically literary education in the high 
school at Buda he entered the Davenport Busi- 
ness College and was thus qualified for the trans- 
action of important business interests. Putting 
aside his te.xt-books, he entered actively upon the 
work of the farm and has since been a representa- 
tive of agricultural interests, placing his fields 
under a high state of cultivation. He also raises 
stock and is now making a specialty of regis- 
tered Durham cattle and Pohind China hogs, of 
which he lias some fine specimens upon his place. 
He has a well cultivated farm and an air of neat- 
ness and thrift pervades it in all its departments. 

On the intli of February, 1891, was celebrated 
tbe marriage of ^Fr. Zink" and :Mis< Xettie Con- 
lev, a daughter of George and Tripb.ena (Sturte- 



iSO 



PAST 



AM) jm;i:si-:xt of iu;i;kai: corxTV. 



vant) Coiiluv, of Bureau county. H.t father, a 
fanner bv oecupation. flioil February 10, 1!)00. and 
his wife survived him oiilv until the "Jlst of April 
of tlio same year. Mr. and Mrs. Zink have tlircc 
children : Neva Elizabeth, born January 17, 1S03 ; 
Althca :\[., January 13, 1S9.5; and Lnurinc Fern, 
July 6, 1897. 

The parents are mend.ers of tlie ^:etlwdi^t 
Epi.=eopal ehurcli, in which Islr. Zink is serving 
as trustee and steward. In politics he is a re- 
puMieaii. stalwart in his advocacy of the party 
prinei])les, and he has frequently served as a 
delegate to county and congressional conventions 
and lias held the otTices of assessor and road over- 
seer, lie has various fraternal relations, being 
a member of Buda lodge, Xo. 339. A. F. & A. ^L. 
while he is also connected with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the iModcrn Woodmen of 
America and the Yeomen of America. He is an 
enterprising, energetic business man, of keen fore- 
sight and laudable ambition, and has already at- 
tanied a gratifying measure of success in his busi- 
ness life. 



AVILLlAJt WILSOX. 

William Wilson, editor and owner of the Walnut 
Leadei, was born in Clarion county, I'ennsylvania, 
October IS, lS.3-2. His i.arents were James and 
Catharine (Schorman) Wilson, tlie former born ii. 
Clarion county, Pennsylvania, and the latter near 
Pleading, that state. In their family were eight 
children, of whom William was the third in order 
of birtlu They were brouglit by their parents to 
Illinois in the .sja-ing of ISCS.'the family home 
being established in Wiiiteside county. 

William Wilson began his education in a log 
schoolhouse in Pennsylvania and afterward coii- 
tinued liis studies in the public schools of Illinois 
and in the high scliool at ^Morrison, this state. 
After putting aside his text-books in 18G8 he 
entered the printin^ 
gator 



lishcd weekly and is devoted to the dissemination 
of general and local news. 

Mr. Wilson was married on the Sth of October, 
is; 4, to ]\[iss Louisa F. Cox, who was born in 
Prophetstown, Illinois, December 8, 18.55, a 
daugliter of Edwin F. and Lucy E. (George) Cox. 
Her father, a native of Vermont, came west m 
IS.jC and located at Proplietstown, Illinois. In 
his family were four cliildren, of whom Mrs. Wil- 
son is the eldest. She was educated in the high 
school at Prophetstown and in Averil's Seminary, 
and by her marriau'c has become the mother of five 
children: M.uul C.. born July 33, 1877; W. Gor- 
don, who wa- bnin August 21, 1879, and died 
XovombiT 7. 190-.': Aunes Lucy, born September 
'31, ISSl ; Louisa :\larv. April 9, 1883; and Edwin 
C. Februarv 15, ISSG. 

:\lr. Wilson has been active and influential m 
communitv affairs. He served as village clerk of 
Walnut foV two terms and is a republican m poli- 
tics. Formerly he gave his political allegiance to 
the dcmocracv,''but two years ago his political faith 
changed and he has since edited his paper in sup- 
port "of republican principles. His religious faith 
is that of the Presbvterian church, but he does not 
hold membership therewith. His wife, liowever, 
is a member of the Baptist church. 

:Sh: Wilson is a self-made man, whose only cap- 
ital in starting out in life ^vas his good liealth, 
his enercy and willingness to work. He thoroughly 
mastered the business in which as a young trades- 
man he embarked, becoming familiar witli print- 
ing in principle and detail, and through his m- 
diistry and perseverance he has gained a credit- 
able place as a representative of journalistic in- 
terests in tliis county. 



^ office of the Eeform Invcsti- 

in Morrison to learn the trade, remaining 

there for two years. In August, 1871, he removed 



EPXEST J. 11 ALL. 
Ernest J. Hall, who is i'anning in La ^^loillr 
township and is one of FSurcau county's native 
sons, was born January IS, 1807. His parents 
were John H. and Charity (Smith) Hall, both of 
whom were natives of Hackettstown, Xew Jersey. 



to Prophetstowk and bee "m^ ' a "printer in the They were married in that state, and thinking to 
oftice of the Prophetstown Spike, then owned by enjoy better opportunities in the middle we^t, came 



oftice of the Prophetstown Sp: 
Charles Bent and A. D. Hill. Fie was connected 
therewith for some time and in 1874 he was mar- 
ried and began farming, operating his father's old 
home place. Subsequently, however, he re-entered 
the newspaper field at Walnut, purchasing the 
Walnut Motor in 1883. In 1890 a disastrous fire 
visited the town, destroying nearly its entire busi- 
ness section, including the printing office of Mr 
Wilson. He, however, at once made arrangementi 
for the continuance of the pajicr, which he pub- 
lished until :March 1, 1891. In April, 1S92, he 
established the Walnut Leader, which he has since 
owned, edited and published. It is a six column 
quarto and has a bona fide circulation oi over 
ei'dit hundred and twenty-five copies. It is pub- 



toll'linois in 1800, settling in Bureau county. 

Ernest J. Hall,' the youngest in their family of 
ten children, is indebted to the public-school sys- 
tem of La iloille for the educational privileges he 
enjoved, and during the periods of vacation he 
was 'trained to habits of industry and enterprise 
through the assistance which was required from 
him in the work of the fields on the home fariu. 
He gra<lually gained broad and accurate expori- 
ence'^in fai-m work in all of its departments, and 
tliroughout his entire life he has followed agri- 
cultural pursuits. He now owns one hundred and 
thirty-three acres of good land lying adjacent to 
the village of La Moille. This is a valuable prop- 
erty, and'^in addition to the cultivation of the fields 



PAST AX I) 1' 



III- 



AU corxTY. 



,Mf. Hall tVedri ho-s and lin.U iii llicir salu a good 
souiTC ol" irKOiue annually. He is a sclf-iuado man, 
having started out in life alono and gained his 
prosenl jn.)ist.'--.-.ions tlirough unreniiiling diligouee 
and uiial>atiiig encrgv- He is aceuuntcd our of 
the leading fanners of the township in uliieli he 
resides, and his j^laec is splendidly located, so that 
the advantages of the town are easily obtainable, 
wliile those of rural life arc eonstantly enjoyed. 
There is a good set of farm buildings and line 
sliade trees add to the value ami attractive ap- 
pearance of the place. In. the pastures are found 
good grades of stock, and the late.-t inipmved 
niacliiaery facilitates tlic work of the fields. 

ilr. Hall was married to iliss Laura 11. l'"r,ny, 
who was boi-ii in Bureau county, August 15, ISO". 
TliPV became the parents of four cliildron: ;\Iar- 
garc't M., born June 23, l'69o; Lucy L., :\[ay ■??, 
18DS; George W., December 30, 1900; and Esther 
C, June 19, 1903. Mrs. Hall is a daughter of 
George and Mary (Palmer) Frarv, the former 
a native of Massachusetts and the latter of Ohio. 
They became residents of Illinois in 1SG3, and 
in tlieir family were si.x children, of whom Mrs. 
Hall is the. youngest. She, too, \vas cduoatcil in 
the public schools of Bureau couniy. 

llr. Hall is a valued and popular member of tlie 
Modern Woodmen camp, No. 227, and the Mystic 
Workers, Xo. 4S. His political allegiance is given 
the republican party. He contributes to the sup- 
port of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which 
his wife is an earnest and faitliful member, 'i'liey 
are greatly esteemed in the conmumity, and their 
circle of friends is almost co-e.vtcn.^ivc with the 
circle of their acquaintance. 



JAMES FJSlIEi;. 

James Fislier, living in Gold towi)-bip. where 
he is owning and operating a farm of niiict}-four 
acres, was born in Pennsylvani;i, anil dates his 
residence in Bureau county from an eai-Iy period 
in its development, having lived hme for tifty-two 
years. He was only two years ohl at the time of 
his arrival, having been brought to this county 
by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John ]). Fisher, who 
came from Pennsylvania in IS-Jt and settli'd south 
of Buda. The father began farming tlicie upon 
one hundred and twenty acres of land, and tiie son 
was reared to agricultural pursuits, early becoming 
familiar with the work of field and meadow. His 
education was acquired in the common schools of 
Gold township, wherein he nuistered the branches 
of English learning usually taught in sucli insti- 
tiitinns. Uav;;ig arrived at years of maturity, ho 
began farming on his own account, and is now the 
owner of ninety-four acres, constituting an exci'I- 
lent place, for the land is valuable, being of a char- 
acter that would enable him to command the higli- 
cst market price did he desire to sell. 

Mr. Fiivher was married in this county to Miss 



Maggie Blaisdell, a native of Stark county and a 
daughter of Horace Blaisdell, who was a farmer. 
Unto ]Mr. and .Mrs. Fisher have been born si.K chil- 
dren, five daughters and a sou: I^ydia, who, at the 
age of twenty-three years, is at home with her 
parents; h^mma, the wife of David Smith, a iire- 
man on the Pock Islaiul Kailroad, living in Blue 
Island, Illinois; Mabel, Florence, Irene and Wil- 
ber, aged respectively eighteen, fourteen, twelve 
and eight years. 

Ml-. Fisher exercises his right of franchise in 
supj)ort of the men and measures of the repub- 
lican I'arty, but has never desired oflice. On the 
contrary, he has preferred that others should serve 
ofliidally, while he gives his attention to his farm 
v.ork, which, being capably conducted, is bringing 
to him a gratifying measure of success. A resi- 
dent of this county for more than a half century, 
he has been an interested witness of its growth and 
development, and has seen many changes here as 
the evidences of pioneer life have been replaced 
bv the evidences cd' modern civili/;ation. 



Fh'A.VK LAWPKXGE DABLKP. 

FranI; La\wenec Dabler, a son of George W. and 
Anna May Dabler, was born, upon the old family 
homestead in Manlius township, October 5, 1S73. 
At the usual age he entered the common schools, 
mastering the branches of learning therein taught. 
His time was also divided with the pleasures of 
the plaj-grouud and the work of the farm, for at 
an early age he began assisting his father in carry- 
ing on tlie farm work, and his entire lite has been 
devoted to agricultural pursuits. The practical 
knowledge which he gained in his youtli has proven 
of immense value to him since he began larming on 
his own account. He has never desired to enter 
other business, and is now the owner of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land near the old home- 
stead and a short distance from Manlius, whereon 
he has erected some very good buildings. He has 
also brought his fields under a high stare of culti- 
■vation, and thus annually harvests good crops. 

On the 20th of January, 1892, was celebrated 
the marriage of Mr. Dabler and Miss Elsie Par- 
melia Hewitt, a daughter of George W. Hewitt, of 
ifanlius township, who was one of the old settlers 
of the county. Two children grace this marriage: 
Ervin, born Xovember 11, 1901; and Vonda, Sep- 
tember 20, 1902. They also lost one child in in- 
fancy. The pai-ents are highly esteemed socially 
and have a large circle of friends. 

Mr. Dabler -votes the democratic ticket, but is 
without aspiration for oflice. He holds member- 
ship in the Baptist church in Manlius tOTv-nship, 
in which he is now serving as a deacon, and he is 
also a trustee of the Baptist cemetery. It will 
thus be seen that his interest does not center in 
his business to th.e exclusion of all oth:r things, 
for while successfully conducting his farm he yet 



PAST AND PKESEXT OF KUKEAU COUNTY. 



fiuds time and opportiuiiiy lo do his iiati in the 
work ol' geiioi'al progress aud iniproveui'-ul in his 
county, standing for intolleetual and moral devel- 
opmeut as well as material progress. 



''-■ JAilKS IIENI^Y SillTJI. 

'■James Henry Smith is a farmer aud stock- 
raiser, living on section 13, ililo township. One 
of Bureau county's native sons, his birth occurred 
in this tov.nship, August 11, 1S72. He is a son 
of James A. Smith, a retired farmer residing in 
Bradford. The father was born in Ithaca, Tioga 
county, Xcw York, November 25, 184.0, and was a 
son of William and Lucy (Kobinson) Smith. The 
father came west in 1863 and located in Milo town- 
ship, where he was employed at farm hibor and 
afterward engaged in cultivating rented land until 
1873, when he bouglit one hundred and sixty acres, 
which he still owns. He now has about four hun- 
dred acres in ililo township, which is devoted to 
general farming and stock-raising, but he leaves 
the active management and work of the farm to his 
son, William J. Eetiring from business life in 
1003, he removed to Bradford, where he owns a 
beautiful home which he now occupies. Ou the 
2Sth of March, 18CS, Mr. Smith was united in 
marriage lo Miss Mary J. Fox, a native of New 
York. They became the parents of four children, 
three sons and a daughter, and after the death of 
the w^ifc and mother ilr. Smitli married again, his 
second union being with Jane Culton, a native of 
this county. The children of the first marriage 
are: James H., of this review; William J., of 
Milo township; George E., who is living in Mar- 
shall county, Hlinois; and Sarah J., the wife of 
William Hardy, of Indiana. Mr. Smith is a re- 
publican, but without aspiration for office. A man 
of nuuiy e.xecllent qualities, he has in his private 
life and his business relations won the confidence 
and good will of those with whom he has been as- 
sociated. All who know him entertain for him the 
warmest regard, and his circle of friemls is an 
extensive one. 

After attending the common schools James H. 
Smith continued his education in Dixon P>usincs3 
College at Dixon, Illinois, and was graduated with 
the class of 18S4. He has always followed farm- 
ing, early becoming fanuliar with the work of 
plowing, planting and harvesting, as he assisted 
in the improvement of the old home place. He 
purchased his present farm in 189-5 from C. B. 
EdmiDston, of Wyanet, Illinois, and is now the 
owner of four hundred acres of fine and productive 
land in Milo township, upon which are gooil build- 
ings and all modern accessories and improTements. 
He also owns considerable land in. Brown county. 
South Dakota, and he carries on general farming 
and stock-raising, feeding much stock and buying 
much corn for this purpose. He is a man of 
indefatigable energy, displaying keen discernment 



in business allairs and excellent ability as a man- 
ager. Whatever he undertakes he carries forward 
to successful completion, and he realizes that 
"there is no excellence without labor." 

Mr. Smitli was married to Miss Jennie Eeid, of 
Milo township, a daughter of J. L. Kcid, and they 
had one child, Mai-jory, who is living with her 
maternal grandfather. In li.'OO Mr. Smith was 
called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who died 
on the 1st of June of that year, and he has since 
wedded 2\largaret M. Bradshaw, of Chambersburg, 
Pike county, Illinois. They h:ive a pleasant home 
and are highly esteemed people, who hold mem- 
bership in the Methodist Episcopal church. Po- 
litically ilr. Smith is a republican, and has served 
as school treasurer for some tim-. while fraternally 
he is connected with the iloiern Woodmen of 
America. He has been very successful, and is 
recognized as one of the representative citizens 
of the community, who bears a good name in the 
county where his entire life hiis been passed, and 
who, through a genial, cordin! manner, has be- 
come a popular citizen of Milo ijwnship. 



PETER JENSEN, JR. 

Peter Jensen, a progressive farmer of Ohio 
township, where he is operating a tract of eighty 
acres, is a native son of iJeniuark, haviiig been 
born August 5, 1S7G. His parents are Peter and 
Marie (Jensen) Jensen, likewise natives of Den- 
mark, where they were married and made their 
home until the year 1805, at which time they emi- 
grated with their family to Araerica, hoping to 
enjoy better business advantag':? in this country 
thaTi were afforded in their native land. In their 
family are eight children. 

Peter Jensen, Jr., the fourth child in his father's 
family, was a youth of about nineteen years when, 
in 1895, he accompanied his parents on their em- 
igration to America. He received his education in 
Denmark, and since coming to this country has 
acquired a fair knowledge of the English lan- 
guage. After coming to America he engaged in 
farm work, being employed by others, but by his 
industry, honesty and economy he soon won suc- 
cess, and for the past four years has been carrying 
on agricultural pursuits on his own account, now 
operating a tract of eighty acres in Ohio township. 
He is thoroughly familiar with the best methods 
of farm work, and each year gathers good harvests 
as the result of the care and labor which he bestows 
upon the fields, thus adding to his financial re- 
sources, and the time is undoubte'lly not far dis- 
tant when he will become one of the well-to-do 
agriculturists of his section of the county. 
'' On the 30th of September, ir-'03, Mr! Jensen 
was united in marriage to Miss Ada Wicsel. a 
native of Bureau county, Illino:;. born December 
24, ISSl. Her parents are John and Jlargaret 
(Bauersock) Wiesel, both natives of Germany. 



PAST AND l-KKSENT OF BUIU'IAL' COLLN'TY. 



78:3 



They umigi-atoJ to Ainurka in the yoar ISGG, and 
their marriage was celebrated in lUireuu county. 
In their family are eleven children, of \sh(iMi ilrs. 
Jensen is the eighth in order of birth. She re- 
ceived her education in the district sehuol.-. i>l' Oliio 
township and is now a successful teacher, having 
followed the profession for tlie past six yrars. She 
is an intelligent lady and is proving hvr?c!l' a 
worthy helpmate to her husband. 

ilr. Jensen gives his political support to the 
men and measures of the republieaa party. He 
is one of the residents of foreign birth who, util- 
izing the opportunities olTered to young men of 
ambition and determination, is steadily advancing 
toward the highway of success, and while he is 
now classech among the leailing agricuhurists of 
his section of the county, ha^ promise of even a 
brighter future. 



J. C. HAMKICK. 

J. C. Ilaiiirick, tn \Uiui,i 1,:„ been voueh.al'cd a 
well earned relirciiieiu from labor, \\ as in former 
years a prumiueut and worLh\' representative of 
the agriculiuial interests of Bureau county, and 
now resides in Princeton, making his home at No. 
137 South Church street. He was !)orn February 
18, 1S3S, in Coshocton county, Ohio, and in the 
fall of 183t), when only about a year and a half 
old, was brought to Bureau county by his par- 
ents, James and Pachel (Markley) Hanirick, who 
settled in what is known as Center Prairie, in 
^^'yanet township. They were farming people, the 
fatlier successftdly carrying on general agricultural 
pursuits until he retired from active business life, 
after which he made his home in Wyanet, where 
his death occurred. His wife also passed away 
there. She was born in Coshocton county, Ohio. 
March r20, ISIG, and on the 14th of May, 1837, 
gave her hand in marriage to James llamrick. They 
long traveled life's journey happily togetJier, and 
on the 27th of August, ISS'7, :Mrs. ITamriek passed 
away. In their family were ten children. 

J. C. Ham rick, \\hose name introduces this re- 
view, was reared in Wjauet township, and pursued 
his education in the public schools of the iieigl'bcn- 
hood, while in the periods of vacation he worked 
upon the home farm and gained practical knowl- 
edge of the best methods of carrying on the labors 
of the fields. Throughout his entire business 
career he carried on farming, and was a successful 
agriculturist, who still owns a fine farm in Wyanct 
township. For many years he tilled the soil and 
cared for his crops, but since 1802 he has resided 
at Princeton, wliere he has built a fine residence 
at No. 127 South Church street. There he is liv- 
ing retireil in the enjoyment of the fruits of his 
former toil. 

On the 2.^th of June, 18-57, Mr. Hamiick was 
united in marriage to ^liss Isaphino Diggins, who 
was from Pennsylvania, and wlien young came 



with hi'r parents to Bui'eau county. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Ham rick have a wiile circle of warm friends 
in this county and enjoy the esteem, confidence 
and guild will of many who know them. 



JOHN IIKXIIY I'HILMl'S. 

John Henry I'liillip.-, a vcleian of the Civil war, 
who is uijw farming ninety acres of land on sec- 
tion 3, Xeponset township, where he has made his 
home for liftceu years, was born in Pedwood, Jef- 
ferson county. New Y'ork, Xovember IG, 18 IG, and 
acquired a public-school education. His parents, 
William and Malinda (Helnier) Phillips, were 
both natives of Cortland county, Xcw York, and 
were there reared and married. The mother died 
in Jelferson county, Xew York, September 8, 1855, 
and the father, afterward coming to HIinois, passed 
away in 18G5, at the ago of sixty years, while 
living in Xeponset. In their family were eight 
children, six of whom still survive: Carrie, the 
wife of ^Villiam Cook, a resident of Iowa ; Char- 
lotte C, the wife of Thomas C. Otley, of Xepon- 
set ; ^Marvin, who resides in Jefferson, Iowa ; John 
Henry, of this review; Levi, who is living in Bil- 
lings, Montana; and James, who makes his home 
in Adel, Iowa. The father followed the occupa- 
tion of farming in the Empire state in order to 
provide for the support of his family. He gave 
his political allegiance to the republican parly and 
held membership in the Baptist church. 

Mr. Phillips of this review spent his boyhood 
days in his father's home, and was but eighteen 
years of age when he enlisted in response to the 
country's call, joining the boys in blue of Com- 
pany IT, One Hundred and Forty-sixth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, at Buda. The company went 
to Peoria and was there mtistered in, proceeding 
afterward to Springfield and thence to Quincy, 
returning to Springfield in 1865. After the war, 
in ISGG, Mr. Philips became connected with the 
firm of Huckins & Company, dealers in horses, and 
was with that firm for about twelve years. On the 
expiration of that period he began farming on his 
own account, and has since carried on general agri- 
cultural pursuits and slock-raisLng, giving liis at- 
tention at the present time to the cultivation of 
about ninety acres of land on section 3, X'eponset 
township, where he has lived for fifteen years. The 
farm is well developed, and under his care and 
supervision the fields are made to yield a good re- 
turn in bounteous harvests. 

Mr. Phillips was married to ^Miss Sarah Ellen 
Ausman, a native of Clermont county, Ohio, born 
September 17, 1846, and a daughter of Abraham 
A. and Elsie C. (Snell) Ausrnan. Her father, a 
native of Indiana, died in Leon, Iowa, at the age 
of sixty-five years, while the mother survives at the 
age of eighty-nine years. They were married in 
Ohio, and, on coming to Illinois, settled in Stark 
county in 1851, Mr. Ausman being numbered 



PAST AND rj;i':.s]':xT of 



AL' COr.XTY. 



among tliL' pioiiLri- fiiniR'r.s cf thai lu> jlUy. He 
bought hiiid at a dollar and a half jut acre and 
built tliert' a log house, living in a covfird \vagi;n 
until his pioneer liome was completed. He there 
continued to reside until 1S70, wlien he removed 
to Iowa, where he spent his remaining days. He 
served for many years as justiee oi' the peace in 
Stark county and was a leading and influential 
citizen there, while his otlleial duties were dis- 
charged with the utmost promtpess and impar- 
tiality. Jlis early political support was given to 
the whig party, and upon its dissolution he joined 
the ranks of the new republican party. All his life 
he held membership in the ^Letliodist Episcopal 
church, and was most loyal to its teachings and 
belief. In the family were eight children, of whom 
sFx are now living, as follows: \\'illiain 11., ^lis. 
Phillips, L. T., Melissa, Wesley and Addison. 

Mr. Phillii)S gives his political support to the 
republican party where national issues and ques- 
tions are involved, but at local elections casts an 
independent ballot. He has never cared for public 
office, but is as true and loyal to his country as 
when he follo\\ed the old flag to the south in de- 
fense of the Union. Much of his life has been 
passed in this county, and ho is a typical resident 
of the middle west, possessing the alert and enter- 
prising spirit wliirh lias been the dominant fai-toi- 
in the upbuilding of this section of the couiitr}. 



MYIJOX E. WILLIAMS. 

Myron E. Williams was born in Bureau county, 
October 3, 18.57, upon the old homestead farm 
which is yet his place of residence, and is the 
eldest in a family of four children, the others 
being Erania A., Elmer 0. and Irving S. Wil- 
liams. The parents were Onam and Mary A. 
(Mills) Williams, the former a native of ^Am- 
herst, Massacluisetts, and the latter of Ticou- 
deroga. New York. Mr. Williams was born Au- 
gust 3, 1820, and in the year 1840 came to P.ureau 
county, Illinois, casting in his lot with its pioneer 
settlers. On the 1st of January, 1S.3T, he was 
united in marriage in Bureau county to Miss 
Mary A. Mills, who was born August 1", 1830, 
and who- arrived in Bureau couniy about IS.jO. 

At the usual age Myron E. Williams began his 
education as a public school student, and later 
continued his studies in the high schi^ol at Prince- 
ton. He represents one of the early pioneer fam- 
ilies, and is today the owner of a valuable farm 
property of three hundred and twenty acres, which 
comprises a quarter section that coDstituted the 
original purchase made by his father from the 
government. This was bought for a dollar and 
a quarter per acre, and the deed was signed by 
Zaehary Taylor, then president of the United 
States. The old house first built upon this farm 
ha? sheltered some notable characters, including 
the famous Indian chief, Shabbona. who iiroved 



a fneii.l to the uliUes during the Black ll.awk war 
and other periods of hostility with the Indians, 
and who has slept upon the floor of this cabin 
many a night. In those early days hardships and 
trials were to be borne that are entirely unfamil- 
iar to the settler of the present day, with his 
greater opportunities and advantages. The father 
would haul his grain to Chicago with o.\- teams, 
and the roads were then in poor condition. After 
coming to this county he began raising grain, 
and the price of wheat was only tliree shillings per 
bushel. He had to take his pay in state money, 
which he afterward e.Kchanged for gold, giving 
two dollars and a half in state currency for every 
dollar in gold, for the government would then 
only take gold in payment for land. Many were 
the evidences of pioneer life to be seen here, and 
the family shared in the hardships and trials in- 
cident to e.xistence on the frontier. The trip to 
Illinois .from Amherst, Massachusetts, had been 
made by the father by stage to the nearest point 
on the Erie canal, thence by canal to Buffalo, and 
by way of the Great Lakes to Chicago, which was 
then only an Indian trading post. From Chi- 
cago he traveled across the country to La Moille, 
which was then called Greenfield. Tlie journey 
was completed with freighting teams, as there 
were no railroads. The father of our subject be- 
came at once a factor iu the agricultural develop- 
ment and progress of the county, and as the years 
passed he placed his fields under cultivation, o\ni- 
ing an excellent property. 

Of this Myron E. AVilliums inherited seventy 
acres, which constituted the nucleus of his present 
holdings. He added to the farm from time to 
time as his financial resources have increased, until 
he is now one of the extensive landowners of La 
Moille township, having three hundred and tv.-enty 
acres, constituting a valuable farming projjcrty. 
His place is the visible evidence of his life of thrift 
and enterprise, for he owes his success entirely to 
his own labors. The farm is improved with good 
buildings and fine shade trees, and is so located 
that its value has continually grown. It is one 
of the oldest farms of the county, having been oc- 
cupied by the family in very early days, and from 
uhat time to the present the work of improvement 
has been carried forward along progressive linos, 
until it is now ei|uippt>d with all modern acces- 
sories. 

On the 'Jth of March, 18SC., was celebrated the 
nuirriage of Myron E. Williams and Miss Philcna 
McConnell, who was born March 23, 1859, in 
Bureau county, her parents being James and Cath- 
arine (Higgins) McConnell, natives of Scotland, 
the former born in 1818 and the latter in 1828. 
There were eight children in their family, of 
whom Mrs. Williatus is the seventh in order of 
birth, these being John, James, David, Catharine, 
Ezra, Jannette, Philena and Laura McConnell. 
Four of the number are now deceased, while four 
are still living, and the parents both passed away 



OXA^L WII.LIA^U 



/ 



-MiiS. OXAM WlLLiA.MS. 



PAS'J' A\i) i'i;i;si;xT of r,LM;j:AU cor.x'i'v. 



in this statr. ilis. Willia/iii aeijiiiRa hrr early 
eduealiou in tlie public scliools of Bureau county 
and coinplefed her studies in ilondota high school. 
Mr. and Mrs. Williams have two children : Laura 
E., who was born October 22, 18S!), and is now- 
attending the Princeton high school, and Walter 
n., who was born December 29, 1S9-1, and is at- 
tending school in La iloille. 

At the time of their marriage Mr. and Mrs. 
Williams located upon a farm, and hi? atteutii>u 
has since been given to general agricultural pur- 
suits. He is a member of Modern Woodmen camp, 
No. 227, and is a faithful and zealous adherent 
of the Congregational church, in which he holds 
membership. He exercises his right of franchise 
in support of tlie men and measures of the re- 
publican party, and has served as school trustee and 
school director, but otherwise has never sought 
nor held public ofiice, preferring to devote his 
energies to his business aft'airs, whicli are now 
capably controlled. In a revie\y of his life record 
we note that the salient features in his career have 
been tliose which all men may cultivate and which 
are always attended with good results. He has 
not looked to outside aid or influence for his suc- 
cess, but has placed his dependence upon the sub- 
stantial qualities of energy and watchfulness in 
business, and has gained for himself a place among 
the leading farmers of La ^Moille townsliip. The 
Williams family has been known in this county 
for si-xtj-'Six years, and the name has ever been 
synonymous with good cili/Anship and with honor- 
able business interests. 



WJLLLAM S. SEGUINE. 

W^illiam Sliker Seguiue, deceased, was boni at 
Schooley's ^Mountain Springs, ilorris county. New 
Jersey, October 22, 184-5. He was one of a family 
of fourteen children born to James and Abbie Ann 
(Sliker) Seguine. The father was a carpenter 
and of French descent. The school privileges of 
our subject were very limited, as the large family 
and the fact that there were no free schools in 
New Jersey at that time made it necessary for him 
to start young to earn his way. 

At the time the Civil war broke out he was 
working on a farm for John ]\Iiller. When the 
call came for additional troops the spirit of patri- 
otism in him became supreme and, like the prophet 
of old, he unhitched his oxen, tied them to the 
plow handles and resi)onded with the offer of his 
services, August 13, 18fi2, at Flemington, New 
Jersey. Not until two months was he of suffi- 
cient age to be mustered in, but on October 1.5, 
1SG2, he became a private in Company H, Fif- 
teenth New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, and was 
in the battles at Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, 
Spottsylvania, the Wilderni\-s, Winchester and 
several other engagement.-, being honorably dis- 
charged June 29, lSr..5. He was twic- wo'undod 



and cuinpellcd to sjicnd a sliort time in the hos- 
jiital. ]Ir was taken prisoner at Winchester, 
Augu-l 17, 18G4, by the Thirly-sixUi Virginia 
Voluiili'iis, Gordon's Brigade, Breckenridge's di- 
vision, ]']arly's Corps. During the six months and 
four days' imprisonment he was taken successively 
to Stanton, Lynchburg, Danville, Richmond and 
Libbv; was paroled February 20, 18G5, and dis- 
charged June 29, 186.5. His father, a brother 
Joseph, next younger, and our subject gave nine 
years' service in the defense of our country. 

Soon after the close of the war he came to the 
home of relatives in Ohio, Bureau county, arriv- 
ing December 8, 18G5, and began to do carpenter 
work, which he afterward followed for a liveli- 
hood. In public affairs he .stood for what is 
acknowledged to be right and was energetic in 
pressing a good cause. He was honored in polit- 
ical life three times as townsliip collector and 
various other less remunerative offices, the duties 
of which he carefully and faithfully performed. 
His connection with the Buda Baptist church be- 
gan ]'"ebruary 10, 1886, when he was baptised by 
Kev. J. Coker. His religious experience, how- 
ever, began in his army life aTul steadily grew 
stronger. At the time of his death, A.pril 5, 
190.5,'' he was a trustee of the church, an office 
he had held for many years. He joined the Buda 
Odd Fellows lodge in 1880 and remained an active 
member during his lifetime, always attending its 
meetings when possible, a greater part of the time 
serving as an officer. 

On August 18, 1867, he was uniteil in marriage 
to Barbara (Buchan) Seaverns, in Ohio town- 
ship. In June, 1870, they moved to Buda, Illi- 
nois, which place has since been their home. Five 
daughters constituted the family, upon which the 
father and mother devoted their affection, pro- 
viding for them every advantage they were able to 
sup[)ly in the way of good home surroundings and 
educational opportunities, all but the youngest 
completing the Buda high school course. The 
eldest, Antoinette, was born October 13, 1SG8, 
and married Charles J. Markee, .Tanuary 10, 
1889. Gertrude was born October IP, 1870, and 
married Parker N. I^lason, July 3, 1889. Frances, 
born January 3, 1873, married George F. Sweet, 
Jr.. June 30, 1891. All are residing in and near 
Buda. Nellie, born August IG. l'87.5, married 
A. Frank Byarlay, Jfarch 24, 1904, and lives in 
Neponset, Illinois. Ruth, born November 4, 1883, 
ami died February 2, 1898, in Denver, Colorado. 

Mrs. Seguine was the oldest daughter of Francis 
G. and Flora (Gilchrist) Buchan, both born in 
Scotland, but came to Canada young and there 
tliey were married January 12, 1836. In the 
spring of 1839 they came to Bureau county, lo- 
cating m the mirth part of Ohio township, near 
Fast trrove. After three vcars 'thcv moved to 
Princeton, where :ifr. Buclian followed the car- 
[^cnter trade f(U- a number of years. He worked 
,in tlie obi eoi;rtliou>i- in Princeton, helping fin- 



•790 



PA.- 



A\D rjii:si-:.\'j' of jukj-au colxtv 



ish the interior, \\\\\\v in a nuiiiljcr of tlie oIiIlt 
resideuees Ihtru, ani.ui.L,' lIuMii the Stevens and 
McConiho houses, hi.-, handiwork still endures, 
for in those days doois and window sasli were 
fasliioncd by liand with tools not known to the 
workmen of today. He afterward moved to a 
farm in Oliio township, wliere he remained for 
twenty years. Then moved to a farm north of 
Buda, where he remained ten years, until failing 
health necessitated his leaving the farm, when 
he came to Buda, where he resided until his 
death, September 1.5, ISSS. Ilis widow continued 
to live in Buda until her death, November 38, 
190.3. Francis and Flora Buchan were the par- 
ents of ten children — Robert, who died in child- 
hood; Barbara, born November 20, 1S3S, who 
married John Seaverns, December .5, ISGl, and 
was left a widow October 7, 1SG5 ; "William Y., 
born September 25, 1S40, killed at Missionary 
Eidge, September 20, 1803 ; Mary Ann, who died 
in infancv ; Eliza Jane, born July 22, 1843, who 
married Elijah Bashtel, October 29, ISGC ; Fran- 
cis G., born October 17, 18-15; James B. and Mar- 
garet Ann (twins), born March 26, 1848, the lat- 
ter who married E. 11. Pierce, and after liis death 
married Walter Williams ; Robert D., born No- 
vember 3, 1S50: Nellie, born January 27, 1854, 
who married Guy T. Noi-ton, September 18, 1873. 



PETER PETERSON. 

Peter Peterson, deceased, who at one time was a 
representative agriculturist of Manlius township, 
was born in Denmark, August 18, 1842, and was 
a son of Simon and Mary Peterson. He came 
with his parents to the new world in 1857, the 
family home being established in Pennsylvania, 
where his father carried on farming for about 
eight years. He then brought his family to Illi- 
nois, settling at Sheffield, and in that vicinity 
Peter Peterson worked as a farm hand for some 
years. As he was always faithful and capable 
he had no trouble in obtaining good positions, and 
in 1872, with the money which lie has saved from 
his earnings, he purchased some land near what is 
now called the old homestead and began farming 
on his own account. His parents remained resi- 
dents of Bureau county until called to their final 
rest and throughout liis life the father followed 
the CH_-cupation of farming. 

In 1874 Peter Peter.-on purchased more land and 
farmed the home place of two liundred and twenty 
acres, which he brought under a high state of cul- 
tivation, so that the well tilled fields returned to 
him abundant harvests and his financial resources 
were tliereby annually increased. He devoted hi.s 
entire time to farming until about three years 
prior to his death, when he retired from active 
business life and went to live in Chicago. 

On the 10th of March, 1«70. :\rr. Peterson was 
married to Mi>. Ella Nelson. «ho earn.- fn.m 



Sweden to iViaeriea in 18GG, Unto Mr. and Mr.s. 
Peteison were born two children, who are yet liv- 
ing: Edward Nels ; and Josephine Clara, who 
was born October 25, 1875, and is now in Rock 
Island, Illinois, having graduated from Augustaua 
Conservatory of ilusie in 1S)05. They also lost one 
child, Anna Sophie, who was born ^larch 23, 1873, 
and died on the 4th of September of that year. 

The death of the father occurred in Chicago, 
October 29, 1S9G, and tlie mother, who survives, 
is yet living in Rock Island. He served as school 
director and as township school treasurer for 
about ten years and was interested in having good 
schools and competent teachers. Noting what wa.? 
needed for the benefit of his conimunity and the 
county, he always advocated the employment of 
measures which would promote the general wel- 
fare and gave his co-operation to movements for 
the public good. Ilis life was unmarked by events 
of exciting im])ortance, but was that of a man 
who daily follows the routine of a business career 
and by his honorable methods and straightforward 
dealing gains success and at the same time wins 
the respect of his fellow townsmen. 

Edward Nels Peterson, son of Peter Peterson, 
was born in Manlins township, March 1, 1871, 
and at the usual age entered the public schools, 
wherein he pursued his studies until he had mas- 
tered the common branches of learning. Later he 
attended the State Normal School at Di.xon, Illi- 
nois, and after completing his education turned 
his attention to farming. He resides upon the 
old family homestead and has his farm well im- 
proved and developed, carefully cultivating the 
fields so that rich crops are annually harvested, 
while throughout the farm neatne;= and thrift 
characterize every department. 

On the 14th of March, 1900, Mr. Peterson was 
joined in wedlock to Miss Elizabetl! C. Kingery, 
of Ogle county, Illinois, a daughter of George W. 
and ^lary 0. Kingery, who came from Pennsyl- 
vania. They have two children, ^Marguerite 
Evelyn, born' June 28, 1903; and Grr.nt Edward, 
born" October 2, 1906. Mr. Peterson has served 
his township as school treasurer and is a trustee 
of the English Lutheran church, to which he aiid 
his wife belong. Thcj are highly e;:eemed resi- 
dents of their community, and the warm regard of 
many friends is extended them in recognition of 
their sterliiiir traits of character. 



SA^IUEL P. CLARKE. 
Samuel P. Clarke, a stockman and farmer, who 
operated for many years successfully as a raiser 
and dealer in live stock and is now a resident of 
Princeton, was born in Bureau county on the 
20t]i of April, 1837, thus representing one of 
the pioneer families. His father, George Clarke, 
was a native of Ohio and became a r-^-ident of 
Illinois in 1835. The work of dcveloriment had 



PAST AND PK]:SENT OF P.UKEAU COUNTY. 



?;)1 



scarei'ly 1h.mmi begun in this section of the state 
and people that day believed that the prairies 
could not be inhabited on account of wind storms 
and in consequence chose claims along tlie bolder 
of the forest. Mr. Clarke, however, with won- 
derful prescience, realized that the opportunities 
were greater upon the open prairie and established 
his home there. Time proved his wisdom and 
he renuiined and ])rospered. For many vi'ais he 
successfully conducted general agricultural pur- 
suits and in his later years retired from active 
business, dealing in lands and loaning money. He 
ceased to engage actively in the cultivation of the 
soil in IS.iO, after which he continued Ids real- 
estate speculations and loans. He died in 1S91 
at the age of eighty years, much respected by all 
who knc^r him. lie was one of the earliest set- 
tlers of the county, coming here only three years 
after the subjugation of the Indians in the Black 
Hawk war. He found a district largely uninhab- 
ited and over which v\ild animals roamed, while 
herds of deer were frequently seen and many kinds 
of smaller game could be had in abundance. Fie 
met the hardships and privations of pioneer life 
with a resolute and determined spirit and over- 
came the difficulties in his path, working his way 
steadily upward until for many years he occupied 
a place among the prosperous residents of the 
county, which owed not a little of its develop- 
ment to his business enterprise and active co- 
operation in measures for the public good. Fie 
wedded iMiss Xancy ^latson, a native of Ohio. 

Samuel P. Clarke, born on the old homestead 
farm, pursued his early education in the Dover 
schools and aftei'ward continued his studies at 
Mount Morris, Illinois. Fie then turned his at- 
tention to farming upon his farm and for forty- 
eight years devoted his time and energies to agri- 
cultural pursuits. He engaged largely in stock- 
raising and throughout the entire period of his 
residence on the farm never sold a busliel of grain, 
but fed it all to his stock and also bought from 
five to ten thousand bushels annually. In ISSl 
he began the importation of Galloway cattle, 
Clydesdale and Shire horses and Shetland ponies, 
and thus breeding stock with imported animals 
he did much to nphold the standard of stock-rais- 
ing interests, thereby promoting prices and ad- 
vancing general prosperity for the agricultural 
class. In 1S09, after a very successful career as 
a farmer, 'Mr. Clarke removed to Princeton, where 
he now occupies a beautiful residence, which he 
built in that year. 

On the 1st of January, ISCQ, was celebrated the 
marriage of Samuel P. Clarke anil ^Uss Anne L. 
Poole, a da\ighter of George Poole, a native of 
Vermont, whence lie removed to Bureau cr.unty, 
Illinois, ^[r. and Mrs. Clarke became the parents 
of si.\ chiMi-e